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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • November 09, 1962

    Telegram from the Brazilian Delegation at the United Nations General Assembly, New York, New York, 7:30 p.m., Friday

    Mello-Franco discusses a conversation he had with Soviet Deputy Foreign Minister Vasily Kuznetsov. According to Kuznetsov, the American insistence on the question of inspection is becoming moot [ociosa] since the United States has declared satisfaction with the removal of offensive material existing in Cuba, it is only a pretext to postpone indefinitely the commitment of non-invasion and suspension of the economic blockade against Cuba.

  • November 10, 1962

    Telegram-Letter from Brazilian Embassy in Washington (Campos), 10-13 November 1962

    In conversation with a high officials from the State Department about the prospects of the Cuban situation, three hypotheses about the future Soviet comportment are discussed: 1) abandon entirely the government of Fidel Castro to its own fate; 2) limit itself to leave constituted in Cuba a socialist regime, based on a well-structured communist party and endowed with a repressive political machine, as a political base of propaganda and infiltration in Latin America and 3) to intensify Soviet technical and economic assistance in a manner to transform Cuba into a living demonstration of the efficacy of communism as an instrument of economic development in Latin America. The letter goes on to describe these three points in more detail.

  • November 12, 1962

    Telegram from the Brazilian Embassy in Havana (Bastian Pinto), 6:15 p.m., Monday

    A description of how the American blockade against Cuba has hurt its production, shipping and foreign commerce capabilities. And according to this telegram, the damage that the Cuban economy is suffering is turning this country still more dependent on Soviet help in the immediate future.

  • November 12, 1962

    Telegram from the Brazilian Delegation at the United Nations General Assembly, New York, 7 p.m., Monday

    A description of Brazil's resolution to the United Nations General Assembly regarding Cuba and the denuclearization of Latin America, as well as where the resolution stands in the Assembly thus far.

  • November 14, 1962

    Telegram from the Brazilian Embassy in Havana (Bastian Pinto), 12:15 p.m., Wednesday

    A conversation between Pinto and Raul Roa discussing denuclearization of Latin America and the dismantling of bases like Guantanamo. Pinto also writes that the denuclearization of Africa was an initiative of Fidel Castro in the UN in 1960, and he praised the Brazilian draft, saying that, with the Cuban amendments, it would be an effective guarantee for Latin America and an important step toward disarmament and the suspension of nuclear tests.

  • November 14, 1962

    Telegram from the Brazilian Embassy in Havana (Bastian Pinto), 3:15 p.m., Wednesday

    The tight secrecy continues to surround the conversations with Anastas Mikoyan, however in a conversation with Pinto, he reveals information concerning: Fidel Castro, Cuban-Soviet relations during the crisis and Cuba's refusal to submit to international inspections.

  • November 16, 1962

    Telegram from the Brazilian Embassy in Havana (Bastian Pinto), 4:30 p.m., Friday

    Pinto analyzes Fidel Castro's decision to accept the “unilateral inspection,” when, beforehand, he always rejected inspection of this character.

  • November 16, 1962

    Telegram from the Brazilian Foreign Ministry to the Brazilian Delegation at the United Nations General Assembly, New York, 9 p.m., Friday

    The Brazilian delegation to the United Nations General Assembly advises the Brazilian government not to postpone the voting on the draft resolution about the denuclearization of Latin America.

  • November 16, 1962

    Telegram from the Brazilian Delegation at the United Nations General Assembly (Afonso Arinos), New York, 7:30 p.m., Friday

    Melo-Franco and Cuba's ambassador discuss the nuclearization of Latin America draft to the UN General Assembly.

  • November 16, 1962

    Telegram from Brazilian Embassy in Havana (Bastian Pinto), 6:30 p.m., Friday

    Pinto discusses the current situation in Cuba and feels certain that Cuba depends more and more on Soviet economic help, but that Fidel Castro feels sure of that there will only be an overthrow due to an American invasion or by a prolonged total blockade, that will have more grave international implications.

  • November 16, 1962

    Telegram from the Brazilian Embassy in Washington (Campos), 9 p.m., Friday

    A report from Roberto de Oliveira Campos on how certain actions and diplomatic moves during the Cuban crisis have served to inflame international tensions on both sides.

  • November 19, 1962

    Telegram from the Brazilian Embassy in Moscow (da Cunha), 6 p.m., Monday

    Da Cunha reports that the Soviet press (and government) has hidden from its readers the recent evolution of the Cuban problem/crisis.

  • November 19, 1962

    Telegram from Brazilian Embassy in Belgrade, 12:30 p.m., Monday

    A brief analysis of Chinese-Cuban relations during the crisis and Fidel Castro's diplomatic skills in his relations with both the United States and Soviet Union.

  • November 20, 1962

    Telegram from the Brazilian Embassy in Havana (Bastian Pinto), 9:30 a.m., Tuesday

    Pinto discusses Brazilian-Cuban relations since his arrival in December, especially during the period of crisis.

  • November 20, 1962

    Brazilian Foreign Ministry Memorandum, 'Question of Cuba'

    A memorandum on the Cuban Missile Crisis covering perspectives from the three major actors: U.S., Soviet Union and Cuba.

  • July 06, 1967

    Argentina Naval Intelligence Service, 'Brazil: Prospects in the Field of Nuclear Energy'

    This is an Intelligence Report regarding Brazil’s nuclear activities prepared by the Argentine Navy, which seeks to estimate Brazil’s nuclear intentions in the near future. It is mainly based on newspaper articles as well as declarations of Brazilian high-ranked scientists, diplomats and military officials.

  • October 04, 1967

    Minutes of the Fortieth Session of the Brazilian National Security Council

    Guidelines for the Brazilian nuclear policy in Costa e Silva’s government (1967-1969) and defines the diplomatic attitude of Brazil regarding the negotiations of the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT). During the meeting of the National Security Council, participants agreed on the need to cooperate with another country to start a national nuclear program. On the NPT negotiations, the members of the National Security Council agreed to establish a condition to adhere to the Treaty: the defense of the right to develop peaceful nuclear explosions. Several ministers defended the possibility of using nuclear energy in the future for international security reasons.

  • December 05, 1967

    Letter from the Director of Brazilian National Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN) Uriel da Costa Ribeiro to the Director of the Argentinian National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA) Oscar A. Quihillalt

    Ribeiro conveys the Brazilian interest in establishing a nuclear cooperation agreement with Argentina, expressed during the visit of the Brazilian mission to the inauguration of Ezeiza Atomic facility in Buenos Aires in 1967.

  • September 04, 1968

    Aide Mémoire, 'Sale of 5 Tons of Uranium to Brazil'

    A Brazilian diplomat to Argentina expresses an interest in acquiring five tons of uranium free from safeguards to Argentine authorities. CNEA and the foreign ministry of Argentina approved the request, taking into consideration the favorable diplomatic relations between the two countries at the moment.

  • March 28, 1969

    A Joint Communiqué about West German Minister Gerhard Stoltenberger's Visit to Brazil

    This Joint Communiqué provides details about conversations between West German Minister, Doctor Gerhard Stoltenberger, and members of the Brazilian Ministry of Foreign Affairs and their plans for the General Agreement on Cooperation in Science and Technology. The framework of the agreement included topics of research such as nuclear energy, space and aeronautical research, oceanography, scientific documentation and electronic data processing.