Search in
ADD SEARCH FILTER CANCEL SEARCH FILTER

Digital Archive International History Declassified

SEARCH RESULTS

  • June 19, 1964

    Meeting Minutes, Council of Ministers of the Netherlands, 'Multilateral Nuclear Force'

    Minister of Foreign Affairs Luns reports that the Secretary of State Rusk has asked him to explain the American position regarding the Multilateral Force (MLF) to Prime Minister Khrushchev on his impending visit to Russia. The main point is that the MLF is not intended to give Germany control over nuclear weapons.

  • October 30, 1964

    Meeting Minutes, Council of Ministers of the Netherlands, 'Foreign Policy'

    The Council discusses the attitude of the French government regarding the negotiations about a common grain price and the Kennedy Round, which impact considerations regarding the desirability of the Multilateral Force (MLF). In the discussion of the MLF itself, it is increasingly clear that the position of the French and how the other states will deal with it are crucial for the project’s prospects. On the one hand it seems the Americans will push the MLF through regardless, but on the other hand the initiative seems to have lost some of its urgency. The Americans have signaled to the Dutch their irritation with the attitude of the French.

  • November 13, 1964

    Meeting Minutes, Council of Ministers of the Netherlands, 'Foreign Policy'

    Council of Ministers minutes reports that Minister of Foreign Affairs has met with U.S. Secretary of State Rusk, who was determined to secure Dutch and British participation in the Multilateral Force. The French increase their resisitance to the plan, while anti-German sentiment increases in France.

  • December 04, 1964

    Meeting Minutes, Council of Ministers of the Netherlands, 'European Political Cooperation'

    Minister of Foreign Affairs Luns reports on a discussion he had with Jean Monnet on the EEC and the Multilateral Force (MLF), including topics such as the interconnection between these issues, the risk of a German nuclear force, and transatlantic relations in general. Luns also met with Undersecretary of State Ball, who was keen on moving ahead with the MLF and proposed holding a conference about it in The Hague, which Luns had to decline. Luns furthermore met with Minister of Foreign Affairs Couve de Murville, who put the blame with the Americans for inciting thoughts about nuclear independence on the part of the Germans. Minister of Defense De Jong responds by giving a broad military-strategic analysis, concluding that unity within NATO is essential to prevent American attention from shifting increasingly to Asia.

  • August 17, 1965

    Letter from Dutch Envoy in Bucharest to Minister of Foreign Affairs, 'Invitation for reception in honor of North Korean National Day'

    The Envoy has received a North Korean invitation which he did not respond to; only the Greek Ambassador received this invitation as well.

  • September 17, 1965

    Letter from Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs to Special Envoy in Bucharest, 'Relationship Netherlands-North Korea'

    The chief of the Bureau for East Asia and Pacific responds to the Envoy's concerns regarding North Korea by noting that other diplomats have also been courted by North Korean representatives.

  • May 17, 1967

    Telegram from Dutch Embassy in Warsaw to Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Regarding North Korean Ambassador's Request to Meet

    Dutch representative Calkoen informs the Ministry of a request by the North Korean Ambassador to meet with him and other Embassy officials and proposes to ignore it.

  • May 19, 1967

    Internal Memorandum of the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs, 'Contacts with North Korean Ambassador in Warsaw'

    A brief note stating that Calkoen's conduct (not taking up the North Korean Ambassador's offer) is in line with Dutch policy concerning states it does not recognize.

  • May 24, 1967

    Telegram from Dutch Embassy in Warsaw to Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Regarding North Korean Ambassador's Request to Meet

    Brief telegram from Calkoen requesting instructions on how to respond to the North Korean Ambassador's request to meet, after North Korean 3rd Embassy Secretary inquired by telephone.

  • May 26, 1967

    Telegram from Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs to Embassy in Warsaw, 'Request for meeting by North Korean Ambassador'

    Minister of Foreign Affairs Luns replies that Calkoen should respond to the request with the refusal as phrased in Calkoen's 19 May telegram.

  • November 06, 1967

    Internal Memorandum of Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs, 'North Korean Note'

    A brief note suggests that the 12-page note sent to the Ministry by the North Korean Embassy in Prague should be returned as if never read. The 31 October 1967 North Korean note, introduced by a brief letter in English and provided both in French and in Korean, deals with U.S. imperialism and the risk of war it entails.

  • May 24, 1968

    Letter from Dutch Representative in Beijing to Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Regarding a Conversation with a Representative of the North Korean Trade Council

    Dutch official J.J. Derksen reports on a conversation initiated by North Korean Trade Council representative Choi Jung Keun, who proposed to establish some kind of office in the Netherlands or even have a delegation visit, to which Derksen gave a non-committal reply.

  • June 05, 1968

    Letter from Dutch Embassy in Prague to Ministry of Foreign Affairs, 'Contact with North Korea'

    The Dutch Ambassador in Prague reports on North Korean attempts to establish "official" contact with the Netherlands, as well as their interest in contacting Dutch companies.

  • June 14, 1968

    Letter from Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs to Embassy in Prague, 'Contact with North Korea'

    J.A. Erich informs the Embassy in Prague that elsewhere there have also been attempts by North Korea to establish official contact with the Netherlands.

  • August 09, 1968

    Internal Memorandum of the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs, 'Recognition of North Korea'

    Handwritten memorandum regarding a draft message to the Dutch Permanent Representation to NATO in Brussels, suggesting that the North Korean attempts at establishing contact should be mentioned for completeness.

  • December 03, 1968

    Letter from Dutch Embassy in Moscow to Ministry of Foreign Affairs, 'North Korean Overtures'

    The Dutch Ambassador reports on North Korean overtures such as sending propaganda and an invitation to a cocktail-laced viewing of a movie about the USS Pueblo (which was ignored). Having inquired with other NATO countries' representatives it turned out that only the Luxemburg representative received the same literature while only the Norwegian representative was invited to the cocktail party.

  • December 20, 1968

    Letter from Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs to Embassy in Moscow, 'North Korean Overtures'

    The Ministry informs the Ambassador in Moscow that elsewhere North Korean representatives have made similar overtures, none of which have been responded to in a positive manner.

  • January 10, 1969

    Internal Memorandum of the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs, 'North Korea'

    Reports on a request from Dutch shipbuilding company Verolme N.V. to reconsider the Dutch standpoint regarding the establishment of a (semi-)permanent North Korean representation in the Netherlands to further commercial contacts. Verolme was told there is no reason to reconsider, also given that it was currently able to procure large orders already - two ships were to be delivered to North Korea in September. The American Embassy was confidentially informed of this.

  • May 29, 1969

    Internal Memorandum of the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs, 'North Korean Economic Mission'

    Heldring of the Netherlands Council for Trade Promotion has visited to inquire if the Ministry would object to the Council sponsoring a North Korean trade mission to the Netherlands in June. It did not, but his interlocutor did point out the government's opposition to any permanent trade mission.

  • June 24, 1969

    Dossier of (Draft) Agreements between the Netherlands Council for Trade Promotion and their Japanese, Irish and North Korean Counterparts

    A cover letter from Heldring of the Netherlands Council for Trade Promotion (in Dutch); the text of agreements with the Japan External Trade Organization and the Irish Export Board (in English); and a draft agreement with the Korean Committee for the Promotion of International Trade including lists of goods (in English).