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  • October 04, 1962

    Telegram from Soviet Ambassador to the USA Anatoly F. Dobrynin to the USSR Ministry of Foreign Affairs

    Dobrynin sends the results of a meeting between Rusk, himself and the Foreign Ministers of Latin American countries where they discussed questions of security, trade, and the question of the Cuban government in exile.

  • October 08, 1962

    Telegram from Brazilian Delegation at the 17th UN General Assembly

    Cuban President Osvaldo Dorticos says in a meeting with Afonso Arinos de Mello-Franco that Cuba does not desire to be armed more than it has to for defense. They also discuss United States interference in Cuban affairs.

  • October 18, 1962

    Telegram from Polish Embassy in Washington (Drozniak), 18 October 1962

    Drozniak discusses the possibility of US military action against Cuba, as well as Cuba's foreign relations with the USSR and the US.

  • October 18, 1962

    Telegram from Polish Embassy in Washington (Drozniak), 18 October 1962

    Drozniak forwards a report from US Assistant Secretary of State for Inter-American Affairs [Edwin M.] Martin. Martin says that the Americans are well-informed of the military situation in Cuba, that Cuba does not possess nuclear weapons (nor will they be likely to because the USSR did not give such weapons to China, so why would they give them to Cuba?), that the level of the Cuban economy is twenty-five percent lower than the period before Fidel Castro came to power and Cuba is much more economically dependent on the USSR, and finally that any military invasion or complete blockade of Cuba would be considered an act of war by the USSR.

  • October 18, 1962

    From the cable on the conversation between Gromyko and Kennedy

    Gromyko reported on his meeting with Kennedy. The Soviet representative argued that Cuba was never a threat to the US and Washington should end its hostile activities against Havana. He also warned Kennedy of the possibility of nuclear war in the event of an invasion of Cuba. Gromyko reiterated the Moscow's intention of supporting Cuba only in economic and defensive issues. Kennedy, however, pointed out that it was difficult to explain the surge in Soviet military aid to Cuba. The US president reaffirmed that Washington did not have any plan to invade Cuba, at least after Bay of Pigs and Operation Mongoose. The US was only preventing actions that could have led to war. Gromyko reemphasized the peaceful rivalry of the two ideological systems and proposed a meeting between the two leaders.

  • October 20, 1962

    Telegram from Polish Embassy in Washington (Drozniak)

    Drozniak compiles information he has collected from US Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for European Affairs William R. Tyler and US Ambassador at Large Llewellyn E. Thompson on the rising Cuban situation and US-USSR relations.

  • October 20, 1962

    Telegram from Soviet Foreign Minister Gromyko to the CC CPSU

    Gromyko relays the results of a meeting with Dean Rusk where the two discuss Cuba, issues in Latin America and American acts or aggression toward Cuba.

  • October 22, 1962

    Telegram from the Brazilian Delegation at the Annual Conferences of CIES (Celso Furtado), Mexico City

    US Secretary of the Treasury C. Douglas Dillon tells the Brazilian delegation that he must leave the Annual Conference of Cities in Mexico because the situation between the US and Cuba is too volatile and "he could not say if there will be or not a world nuclear war by the weekend."

  • October 22, 1962

    Telegram from the Brazilian Delegation at the Annual Conference of CIES (Celso Furtado), Mexico City (Part II)

    Furtado, in a follow-up telegram to his earlier message, recalls the impression that the American government considered the speech of Kennedy as an ultimatum to the USSR on the Cuban question.

  • October 22, 1962

    Telegram from the Brazilian Embassy in Washington (Campos)

    A report from the Brazilian Embassy in Washington, D.C. about several meetings and consultations between the principal members and organs of the government (Kennedy, Johnson, etc.), especially of the Department of State and the Pentagon.Campos believes that an elaborate decision of great significance is in progress and that this decision may refer to Berlin or to Cuba or to the situation of the conflict between India and China.

  • October 22, 1962

    Cable from Federal Republic of Germany Embassy, Washington (Knappstein)

    An analysis of American decisions during the Cuban Missile Crisis and the economic blockade, as well as of American perceptions of Soviet intentions during that time period, by the West German Ambassador to the United States.

  • October 23, 1962

    Telegram from Mexican Embassy, Havana

    A telegram from the Mexican Embassy in Cuba describing that the government of Cuba had given the order to be at battle stations to all its armed forces in anticipation of an air attack against Cuba by the United States.

  • October 23, 1962

    Telegram from Mexican Embassy, Guatemala City

    A telegram from the Mexican Embassy in Guatemala commenting on the speech made by U.S. President Kennedy. The Mexican Embassy says "President Kennedy’s speech tells us that the giant finally woke up and that it will abandon its paralysis and lack of foresight, for a state of arms at the ready and alertness. Guatemala in its great anticommunist majority is prepared as a democratic country to align with our brothers of America."

  • October 23, 1962

    Telegram from Brazilian Embassy in Washington (Campos), 1 p.m., Tuesday

    Suggestion for a decision to internationalize the Cuban crisis would permit Cuba and the Soviet Union to "save face", diminishing the dangerous possibility of direct confrontation.

  • October 23, 1962

    Telegram from Polish Embassy in Washington (Drozniak), 23 October 1962

    In a conversation with Charles Bartlett (a journalist who had befriended President Kennedy), Drozniak learns more of the Cuban Crisis situation and of US-USSR relations, including that the steps taken to address the crisis (the quarentine of Cuba) were implemented by Kennedy in the atmosphere of great pressure from the public opinion.

  • October 23, 1962

    Telegram from Brazilian Foreign Ministry to Brazilian Delegation at the OAS, Washington

    Brazilian officials are suggesting the Brazilian government vote for the part of the North American resolution that prescribes the arms embargo and the inspections of ships that demand ports in Cuba.

  • October 23, 1962

    Soviet Report on American Secrecy Efforts

    Report on US secrecy prior to President Kennedy's October 22 speech announcing the discovery of Soviet missiles in Cuba and the start of a US blockade. Also describes press conference by Robert McNamara.

  • October 23, 1962

    Soviet Report on the Atmosphere in the US following Kennedy's Announcement

    Report on the tense atmosphere in Washington following Kennedy's October 22 announcement. Intelligence from newspaper reports are also summarized.

  • October 23, 1962

    Memorandum of Telephone Conversation between Mexican Foreign Ministry official and Mexican Ambassador to Brazil

    The Brazilian and Mexican diplomats to Cuba weigh in on their respective governments' opinions on the Cuban crisis and increasing U.S.-Cuban tensions.

  • October 23, 1962

    Telegram from Brazilian Embassy in Washington (Campos), 7 p.m. Tuesday

    A report of the meeting between OAS officials and the descisions that were made regarding the Cuban crisis. Secretary Martin puts forward that, soon, there will be fully disseminated, to convince Latin American public opinion of the gravity of the threat, photographs of the remote-controlled missiles in Cuba.