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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • August 18, 1989

    Poland: Non-Communist Government to be Announced

    An analysis of President Jaruzelski's decision to create a new Polish government led by non-Communists.

  • August 19, 1989

    Poland: Situation Report

    An analysis of President Jaruzelski's decision to ask Mazowiecki to form a Solidarity-led government.

  • August 19, 1989

    Soviet Ambassador to Romania E. M. Tyazhel'nikov, Record of a Conversation with N. Ceauşescu and Message for Gorbachev

    Ambassador Tyazhel'nikov relays a message for Gorbachev from Ceauşescu in which he expresses concern about events in Poland and Tadeusz Mazowiecki's appointment as Prime Minister. Ceauşescu argued strongly that the socialist states "must decisively come forth in a united front in order to prevent the formation of a Solidarity-led government in Poland."

  • August 21, 1989

    Transcript of Meeting of the Executive Politburo of the Central Committee of the Romanian Communist Party

    Ceauşescu and the Romanian Executive Politburo discuss events in Poland in August 1989 and Ceauşescu's message to the other socialist countries concerning it.

  • August 22, 1989

    Report of the Embassy of Romania in Warsaw to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, 0145 hr

    Romanian Ambassador to Poland Ion Tesu reports on the Polish response to Ceaușescu's 19 August message to all of the socialist countries. Includes a written response from the PUWP leadership

  • September 07, 1989

    Poland: New Government to be Announced

    An analysis of the new Polish government which confirms Solidarity's majority.

  • November 09, 1989

    Conversation between Chancellor Helmut Kohl and Solidarity Leader Lech Walesa

    In this extraordinary conversation, Solidarity’s leader fears the collapse of the Wall would distract West Germany’s attention - and money - to the GDR, at the time when Poland, the trail-blazer to the post-communist era in Eastern Europe, desperately needed both. "Events are moving too fast," Walesa said, and only hours later, the Wall fell, and Kohl had to cut his Poland visit short to scramble back to Berlin, thus proving Walesa’s fear correct.