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  • July 28, 1983

    Ciphered Telegram No. 152, Embassy of Hungary in the Soviet Union to the Hungarian Foreign Ministry

    Report on an unofficial visit by Rajiv Gandhi, Indira Gandhi's son and future Prime Minister of India, to the Soviet Union in 1983.

  • February 17, 1984

    Hugh Montgomery, director, Bureau of Intelligence and Research, US Department of State, to Ambassador Ronald Spiers, Enclosing 'India-Pakistan: Pressures for Nuclear Proliferation,' Report 778-AR

    A memorandum from Hugh Montgomery, The Director of Intelligence and Research at the State Department to Ambassador Ronald Spiers discussing Indian and Pakistani nuclear proliferation. The Director details tensions between Pakistan and India, potential actions by India to stop a Pakistani nuclear program, and the influence of outside actors such as the USSR, China, and the United States.

  • March 28, 1984

    Ciphered Telegram No. 88, Embassy of Hungary in India to the Hungarian Foreign Ministry

    Report on frictions between the Soviet Union and Indian political leaders.

  • August 13, 1985

    Ciphered Telegram No. 213, Embassy of Hungary in India to the Hungarian Foreign Ministry

    Report on the status of the Indian nuclear program from Soviet sources. India may be preparing for an atomic bomb test.

  • October 23, 1985

    Ciphered Telegram No. 306, Embassy of Hungary in India to the Hungarian Foreign Ministry

    Short report on arguments being made in India to gain support from the Soviet Union for the Indian nuclear program. India would like to gain international prestige similar to China.

  • April 25, 1986

    Report, Embassy of Hungary in India to the Hungarian Foreign Ministry

    Lengthy analysis of relations between the Soviet Union and India, covering diplomatic, military, economic, and cultural relations. Includes discussion of high-level meetings with politicians like Rajiv Gandhi and Ramaswamy Venkataraman; military supplies provided by the Soviet Union to India; and trade agreements between the two countries. Also discusses tensions caused by India's opposition to the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty.

  • January 20, 1987

    Memorandum of Conversation between CPSU Secretary for International Relations Anatoly Dobrynin and Socialist Unity Party (SED) General Secretary Erich Honecker in Berlin

    Dobrynin and Honecker discuss Gorbachev's recent visit to India and the preparations in Afghanistan for the withdrawal of Soviet troops.

  • July 02, 1987

    Record of Conversation between M.S. Gorbachev and Prime Minister R. Gandhi

    Gorbachev and Rajiv Gandhi meet to discuss various issues. Begin by noting the effect of Western radio propaganda within both India and Soviet Union. Gorbachev notes the "voices" of Western radio stations broadcasting in the Soviet Union, aiming to undermine perestroika. After touching on economic initiatives in India, Gandhi singles out, among problems in India, the "weakening of public morals." Blames this problem on the "onslaught of the Western--and first and foremost, American-- mass media." Both sides criticize militarism at base of US foreign policy, and US emphasis on rolling back communism. Conversation concludes with analysis of Afghanistan situation; Gorbachev explains measure USSR is taking to solidify Afghan government, and Gandhi recommends caution when dealing with tribal factor in Afghanistan. Both sides speak on Pakistan's reaction to situation.

  • February 11, 1988

    Record of a Conversation of M. S. Gorbachev with Indian Minister of Defense Krishna Chandra Pant

    Gorbachev and Pant discuss Soviet and Indian foreign relations and the situation in Afghanistan and neighboring Pakistan.

  • November 25, 1988

    Ciphered Telegram No. 333, Embassy of Hungary in India to the Hungarian Foreign Ministry

    Report on Soviet-Indian relations based on conversations with the Indian Foreign Minister and other officials. Gorbachev's visit to India resulted in the signing of several agreements, yet there are concerns in India about the direction of Soviet foreign policy. The two countries disagree about policy towards China, Afghanistan, and the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty.

  • February 01, 1989

    Ciphered Telegram No. 19, Embassy of Hungary in the Soviet Union to the Hungarian Foreign Ministry

    Lengthy report on India's current domestic and foreign policies. Includes discussion of India's upcoming parliamentary elections and preparations by Rajiv Gandhi and the Congress Party. Foreign relations in Asia with countries such as China, Cambodia, and Afghanistan are discussed, as well as India's involvement in disarmament talks through the Six Nation Five Continent Peace Initiative. Lastly, India's relationship with the Soviet Union in foreign policy and trade is described.

  • May 17, 1989

    Diary of Teimuraz Stepanov-Mamaladze, 17 May 1989

    Teimuraz Stepanov-Mamaladze diary entry, describing negotiations between China and a USSR delegation. The negotiations cover border issues, Soviet assistance in improving relations between India and Nepal, and Afghanistan, among other issues. Following the negotiations, Mamaladze describes protesters, "two hundred thousand strong," and notes that the movement has grown beyond just students.

  • July 15, 1989

    Excerpts from the Conversation between Mikhail Gorbachev and Rajiv Gandhi

    Gorbachev and Gandhi discuss the Tiananmen Square Incident in China and the ongoing turmoil within the Chinese Communist Party, including the fate of Zhao Ziyang.

  • April, 2004

    KGB Active Measures in Southwest Asia in 1980-82

    Materials provided by former KGB archivist Vasili Mitrokhin to CWIHP, following the publication of the Working Paper No. 40, "The KGB in Afghanistan." As with all Mitrokhin’s notes, his compilation on Soviet “active measures” in South and Southwest Asia is based on other smuggled-out notes and was prepared especially for CWIHP. Please read the Notes on Sources for information on the nature and limitations of these documents.