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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • April 05, 1971

    Memorandum for President Nixon from Kissinger, "The Berlin Negotiations - New Guidelines"

    National Security Advisor Henry Kissinger updates President Nixon on the status of the Four Power Berlin negotiations between the Soviet Union, East Germany, West Germany, and the United States.

  • July 21, 1971

    Memorandum for President Nixon from Kissinger, "Berlin Negotiations: The Unresolved Issues"

    National Security Advisor Henry Kissinger updates President Nixon on the status of the Four Power Berlin negotiations between the Soviet Union, East Germany, West Germany, and the United States, focusing on unresolved issues on which the four states were unable to agree.

  • August 13, 1971

    Cable from Ambassador Rush to Kissinger Regarding Four Powers Negotiations on Berlin

    US Ambassador Rush informs Kissinger on the progress of negotiations between the Soviet Union, France, Great Britain, and the United States on the status of Berlin. He reports that negotiations have gone well, aside from difficulties with the British and French ambassadors.

  • August 15, 1971

    Cable from Ambassador Rush to Kissinger Regarding Four Powers Negotiations on Berlin

    US Ambassador Rush informs Kissinger on the progress of negotiations between the Soviet Union, France, Great Britain, and the United States on the status of Berlin.

  • August 18, 1971

    Cable from Secretary Rogers to Ambassador Rush on the Four Powers Negotiations on Berlin

    Alarmed by the speed of the negotiations' progress, Secretary Rogers informs Ambassador Rush (and Henry Kissinger) that "an ad referendum agreement should not be reached at the present time."

  • August 18, 1971

    Cable from Ambassador Rush to Henry Kissinger on the Four Powers Negotiations on Berlin

    US Ambassador Rush recommends to National Security Advisor Henry Kissinger that the negotiations take a "no more than a two week recess" in agreement with the request made by Secretary of State Rogers.

  • August 19, 1971

    Cable from Ambassador Rush to Henry Kissinger Regarding the Four Powers Negotiations on Berlin

    Rush updates National Security Advisor Henry Kissinger on the progress of the Four Powers Negotiations on Berlin, informing him that the "bureaucrats [in the State Department] have been foiled" and an agreement has been completed and "it contains virtually everything we hoped to get under our maximum demands."

  • July 18, 1973

    Preparatory Materials for East German Protest Against the Intended Establishment of a Chinese Trade Representation in West Berlin

    These documents are related to East Germany's protest against the intended establishment of a Chinese trade representation in West Berlin. The East German Ministry of Foreign Affairs stresses that West Berlin cannot be regarded as part of West Germany. Therefore, by initiating diplomatic relations with West Berlin without considering the existence of the internationally acknowledged Four Power Agreement on Berlin between the US, Britain, France, and the Soviet Union, China is deliberately acting against the interests of East Germany.

  • July 18, 1973

    Letter from the Deputy Minister of the GDR Council of Ministers to Comrade Hermann Axen

    The Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the GDR asks the PRC to comply with the status of West Berlin as part of the GDR.

  • August 02, 1973

    Memorandum of Conversation Between the Head of the China Desk in the East German Foreign Ministry and the First Secretary of the Chinese Embassy, Tji Hai-yuan

    This is a memorandum on a conversation reflecting the differences of opinion between the head of the China Desk in the East German Foreign Ministry and the First Secretary of the Chinese Embassy Tji Hai-yuan with regard to the intended establishment of a Chinese trade representation in West Berlin. East Berlin is clearly concerned such a step might favor West Germany's alleged goal of winning sovereignty over West Berlin, in violation of the Four Power Agreement. Tji states that he does not understand the East German position, and that the activities of Chinese diplomats in West Berlin are in accordance with international law. He rejects the notion that these relations might conceivably harm the interests of East Germany.

  • December 03, 1973

    Memorandum of Conversation Between the First Secretary of the Soviet Embassy in East Berlin and the Head of the West Berlin Press Office on China's Intention to Establish a Trade Representation and Consulate in West Berlin

    This is a memorandum of a conversation between the first secretary of the Soviet embassy in East Berlin, Rodin, and the director of the West Berlin Press Office, G√ľnter Struve, with regard to China's intention to establish a trade representation in West Berlin. Apart from stressing that by initiating diplomatic relations with West Berlin, China is not implicitly acknowledging the existing international agreements, Rodin makes clear that East Germany will not rescind the rules on obligatory currency exchange for citizens of Western states.

  • December 06, 1973

    Agreement on Cooperation between the Stasi and the KGB, 6 December 1973

    1973 agreement between the Stasi and the KGB outlining their cooperative efforts to fight "ideological subversion" and uncover "the hostile plans of the enemy." Both secret services would also exchange information gathered by their espionage activities and provide mutual support in infiltrating agents. Of particular mutual interest was espionage against the Federal Republic of Germany and West Berlin. To this end, the KGB was permitted to recruit East German citizens, and the MfS would secure their ongoing contacts.

  • December 18, 1973

    Memorandum of Conversation Between the Head of the Far Eastern Department in the East German Foreign Ministry Liebermann and Chinese Ambassador Peng Guang-wei on China's Intention to Establish Diplomatic Presence in West Berlin

    This memorandum of conversation between the Head of the Far East Department in the East German Foreign Ministry Liebermann and Chinese Ambassador Peng Guang-Wei refers to China's intention to establish diplomatic relations with West Berlin. The East German side stresses the fact that countries such as Hungary and Bulgaria also established diplomatic relations with West Berlin taking into considerations the conditions posed by the international law and that China should do the same.

  • September 09, 1980

    Measures Against a Discussion of a Draft Resolution Containing Points of an Anti-Soviet and Anti-Afghan Orientation at the 67th Conference of the Interparliamentary Union

    This CC CPSU document discusses the anti-Soviet and anti-Afghan movements that interfered with the establishment of an Afghani parliament.

  • August 13, 1981

    Activities of Iranian Left Extremist Groups in West Berlin

    A report from a "trusted informal collaborator" claims that Iranian leftist groups will seek to enter East German to protest or attack the embassy of Iran.

  • January 21, 1983

    About Activities of the Political Police and the Office for Protection of the Constitution against Iranian Citizens in the GDR and West Berlin

    A report on surveillance activities of members of the Tudeh Party living in West Berlin.

  • August 23, 1983

    Information Report About the Present Activity of the DPRK Embassy in the GDR

    A detailed report about the North Korean embassy in East Germany, focusing on its political and propaganda activities.

  • July 16, 1985

    Report by International Olympic Committee Vice President on his Trip to North Korea

    A report from IOC Vice President Kumar regarding his trip to North Korea. He addresses attempts to ease tensions between North Korea and South Korea over the staging of the 1988 Summer Olympics and to determine if the two countries would be able to work together on the event.

  • June 12, 1987

    Speech by President Ronald Reagan at the Brandenburg Gate, West Berlin, 'Remarks on East-West Relations'

    Ronald Reagan's famous speech in which he advises Soviet General Secretary Mikhail Gorbachev to "tear down this wall!"

  • September 24, 1987

    Procedure concerning Operative Advance Notification on Cross-Border Transit requested by DPRK Security Organs

    Stasi procedures for South Koreans transiting via East Germany for meetings with DPRK officials.