Search in
ADD SEARCH FILTER CANCEL SEARCH FILTER

Digital Archive International History Declassified

SEARCH RESULTS

  • August 20, 1954

    Letter, Syngman Rhee to General James A. Van Fleet

    Syngman Rhee writes to General James A. Van Fleet to express his dissatisfaction with the United States' defense committment to South Korea and the rest of the free world. After describing his own "plan for military action" on the Korean Peninsula, Rhee also touches on South Korea's delicate relationship with Japan.

  • September 04, 1954

    Chinese Foreign Ministry Intelligence Department Report on the Asian-African Conference

    The Chinese Foreign Ministry reported Indonesia’s intention to hold the Asian-African Conference, its attitude towards the Asian-African Conference, and the possible development of the Conference.

  • November 06, 1954

    Cable from the Chinese Foreign Ministry, ‘Premier Zhou’s Talk with Members of Japan’s Diet’

    Zhou Enlai and Japanese Diet Members discuss Japan's relationship with the United States, the overall trends in Sino-Japanese relations, and some specific issues in Sino-Japanese relations, such as war criminals, fisheries, and communications.

  • December 25, 1954

    Cable from the Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'Regarding Our Attitude towards the Afro-Asian Conference'

    The Chinese Foreign Ministry informed Chinese embassies overseas that China supported the Asian-African Conference as well as the participation of the countries with whom China had no diplomatic relation, such as Japan, the Philippines, and Thailand. China also emphasized that Chiang Kai-shek was not to be invited to the Conference.

  • December 29, 1954

    Cable from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs Intelligence Department, 'The Agenda of the Five Southeast Asian Countries from the Bogor Conference and the Five Countries’ Attitudes towards China’s Participation in the Afro-Asian Conference '

    The agenda of the Bogor Conference was to determine the purposes, timing, and participants of the Asian-African Conference. The five Southeast Asian countries agreed that China and Japan should participate in the Asian-African Conference, but some countries also insisted on the participation of US allies such as Thailand and the Philippines.

  • 1955

    Report from the Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'List of Problems Between China and Other Asian-African Countries'

    A list of problems between China and other Asian-African countries

  • 1955

    Information on Japan’s Participation in the Asian-African Conference

    A Chinese report on Japan's participation before the Asian-African Conference. The report observes that the Japanese public paid more attention to this conference than to the previous Bangkok conference and highlighted Tokyo's desire to cooperate with China.

  • January 10, 1955

    Cable from Feng Xuan, 'Reaction of Britain, United States, France towards the Kuala Lumpur Five Countries inviting China to attend the Afro-Asian Conference'

    The UK responded the decision of inviting China to attend the Asian-African Conference with anger, stating that countries in the Bogor Conference had wrong expectations toward China. The US feared that China would have great influence on the Asian-African Conference and thus weaken US influence in the region. The US and UK also worried that China’s participation would improve China-Japan relations. French press expressed this decision as the evidence of the failure of the US power in Southeast Asia.

  • February 19, 1955

    Report from the Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'The Joint Secretariat of the Asian-African Conference'

    Chinese report on the creation of the Joint Secretariat of the Asian-African Conference and its work to prepare the Conference (venue, broadcasting, etc.) The report also discussed the preparation of India, Afghanistan and Japan. Besides, American efforts to sabotage the conference through its vassal countries were also mentioned.

  • March 08, 1955

    Statement of Young P. Lee, Chairman of the Central Liaison Office, Asian Peoples' Anti-Communist League

    Young P. Lee objects to Japan attending a meeting of the Asian Peoples' Anti-Communist League.

  • March 08, 1955

    Report from the Chinese Ministry of Foreign Trade, 'Plan for Our participation in theTtrade Activities of the Asian-African Conference (Draft)'

    The Department of International Trade estimated that the Asian-African Conference would be a good occasion to strengthen economic and trade relations with the participating countries. The Department of International Trade therefore made the recommendations to befriend with these former colonies for developing strong economic and political relations.

  • March 12, 1955

    Report from the Chinese Ministry of Foreign Trade, 'Scheme for Our Participation in the Trade Activities of the Asian-African Conference (Revised Draft) (Preliminary Paper)'

    The Department of International Trade estimated that the Asian-African Conference would be a good occasion to strengthen economic and trade relations with the participating countries. The Department of International Trade therefore made the recommendations to befriend with these former colonies for developing strong economic and political relations. This is the modified version of the draft plan that was issued earlier.

  • March 21, 1955

    Letter, Young P. Lee to Major General D.A.D. Ogden

    Chairman of the Asian Peoples' Anti-Communist League Central Liaison Office Young P. Lee thanks General Ogden for supporting the anti-communist struggle in the Ryukyu Islands.

  • March 27, 1955

    Report from the Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'Compilation of the Excerpts of the Telegrams Concerning the Asian-African Conference'

    The collection of telegrams covers the procedure and agenda about the Asian-African Conference, the arguments about China’s participation in the Conference, the attempts of the US and the UK to influence the Conference, and the attitudes of various countries toward the Conference.

  • March 28, 1955

    Report on a Trip to Vietnam

    Choi Duk Shin and Young P. Lee summarize their travels through Hong Kong, Bangkok, and Vietnam, including their discussions on politics, military situations, cultural sharing, and strategies for Free Asia to join together against Communism.

  • April 03, 1955

    Minutes of Premier Zhou Enlai’s Meeting with Indonesian Ambassador Arnold Mononutu

    Indonesian Ambassador to China and Zhou Enlai talked about the Ambassador's plan to accompany Zhou Enlai to Burma before coming to Indonesia for the Asian-African Conference. They also discussed lodging for the Chinese delegation in Jakarta as well as the principle of non-interference in other countries' affairs.

  • April 04, 1955

    Report from the Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'Draft Plan for Attending the Asian-African Conference'

    The participants in the Asian-African Conference had the common interest in pursuing international peace and national economic and cultural development. China should take the advantage of this Conference to promote national independence movement and to establish stronger relations with Asian and African countries. According to this goal, the plan listed the common issues that all participants faced, the issues that existed between China and other countries, and the issues that China alone was facing. It also spelled out the relations of China and different groups of counties in the Conference, as well as the logistic issues.

  • April 11, 1955

    Report from the Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'Attitudes of Various Countries towards the Asian-African Conference on the Eve of the Conference'

    The Chinese Foreign Ministry examines the attitude of several parties to the Asian-African Conference, including India, Egypt, Thailand, the Philippines, and Japan.

  • September 10, 1955

    Gazette of the State Council of the People's Republic of China, 1955, No. 14 (Overall Issue No. 17)

    This issue begins with orders related to grain conservation. It also includes a statement regarding the departure of Japanese who stayed in China after World War II and documents that address China's exclusion from the Inter-Parliamentary Union. Other sections cover cooperation between Chinese and East German scientists, Sino-Egyptian trade negotiations, and regulations for graduate students in the Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  • October 05, 1955

    Letter, Kim Yong-shik of the Korean Mission in Japan to President Syngman Rhee

    Kim's gratitude to Rhee on the hospitality shown at Kim's visit to Chinhae and report on trade issues between Japan and ROK