Search in
ADD SEARCH FILTER CANCEL SEARCH FILTER

Digital Archive International History Declassified

SEARCH RESULTS

  • January 28, 1963

    Hungarian Embassy in Havana (Beck), Report on Soviet Deputy Foreign Ministry Vasily Kuznetsov

    Hungarian Ambassador to Cuba János Beck recounts an evening at the Soviet ambassador’s home with other socialist ambassadors to Cuba. Soviet functionary Kuznetsov reported on deliberations between the Soviet Union and United States on the Cuban Missile Crisis and nuclear issues. Beck also describes events that Kuznetsov attended while visiting Cuba, not all welcoming. Kuznetsov met with Castro while in Cuba and addressed the crisis among other problems.

  • February 15, 1963

    Report, Embassy of Hungary in North Korea to the Hungarian Foreign Ministry

    Hungarian and Czech Ambassadors discuss the recent resolution by the Korean Workers Party to build up North Korea's defenses as well as the situation in South Korea.

  • March 12, 1963

    Hungarian Embassy in Havana (Beck), Report on Conversation with Cuban Foreign Ministry Official on Hungarian-Cuban Relations and Sino-Soviet Split

    Hungarian Ambassador to Cuba János Beck reports on a conversation between Hungarian functionaries Görög and Sütő and Cuban Ambassador to Hungary José Fuxa. Their discussion revolves around Cuban-Hungarian and Sino-Soviet relations.

  • March 31, 1963

    Hungarian Embassy in Havana (Beck), Report on US–Cuban Talks

    Hungarian Ambassador to Cuba János Beck reports talks held between Cuba and the United States. US lawyer James Donovan has meet with Fidel Castro to discuss prisoner exchanges. Castro and Donovan also have discussed steps to normalize Cuban-American relations, without success. Beck repeats a claim that the Cubans are interacting with the US to have leverage over the Soviet Union.

  • May 27, 1963

    Report, Embassy of Hungary in North Korea to the Hungarian Foreign Ministry

    A North Korean political officer speaks of Kim Il Sung's firm belief that an American nuclear attack could not destroy North Korea for their country would find refuge in the maze of underground caverns.

  • June 06, 1963

    Hungarian Embassy in Havana (Görög), Report on Fidel Castro’s Television Report on his Trip to the Soviet Union

    Chargé d’Affaires ad interim Erzsébet Görög adds to a television report of Fidel Castro’s visit to the Soviet Union from 27 April-3 June 1963. Görög makes note of the fact that Castro uses a television interview to describe his trip instead of a standard, large speech. Görög finds a charismatic appeal in Castro.

  • June 21, 1963

    Hungarian Embassy in Moscow (Szipka), Report on Soviet-Cuban Relations

    Hungarian Ambassador to Cuba József Szipka reports on Soviet-Cuban relations from the early stages of the Cuban revolution to the present. The Cuban government depends on economic, military and political aid; trade agreements; and cultural and scientific exchanges from socialist governments, primarily the Soviet Union. Szipka adds that the Soviet Union’s flexible political steps during the Cuban Missile Crisis ensured Cuba’s security from a US invasion. From Szipka’s perspective, the missile crisis was a valuable learning experience for Cuban officials.

  • June 23, 1963

    Hungarian Embassy in Havana (Görög), Report on Reactions to Fidel Castro’s Trip to the Soviet Union

    Chargé d’Affaires ad interim Erzsébet Görög writes a preliminary assessment of Castro’s state visit to the Soviet Union in 1963. Görög reports on improvements in Cuba’s party organization and positive reactions from the Cuban public and media on Castro’s visit. Görög notes different reactions to the visit between the economic/technical and artistic intelligentsia, adding that “Khrushchev managed to win Fidel over to his side in the Soviet-Chinese dispute.” Other topics include emigration and external counter-revolutionary activities.

  • June 25, 1963

    Report from Hungarian Embassy, Prague, on Czechoslovak-Cuban Relations

    Hungarian ambassador to Czechoslovakia Lajos Cséby summarizes Deputy Head of the Sixth Main Department [of the Czechoslovak Ministry of Foreign Affairs] Stross’s report on relations between Cuba and Czechoslovakia. Stross reports friendly relations between the two countries, which did not experience difficulties during the Cuban Missile Crisis. Stross outlines Cuba’s problems, economically and politically, and believes that Cuba’s revolutionary success depends on its economic growth. Cuba misunderstood the Soviet Union’s approach to the Cuban Missile Crisis. This led to signs of Chinese influence on Cuban politics, which Stross believes are reversing since Castro’s [1963] visit to the Soviet Union.

  • August 26, 1963

    Report, Embassy of Hungary in North Korea to the Hungarian Foreign Ministry

    A report by Hungarian Ambassador in North Korea on two meetings between the Romanian Ambassador and Kim Il Sung in which the two discussed bilateral relations, trade, geological surveys in North Korea, and North Korea's relations with China and the Soviet Union.

  • August 29, 1963

    Hungarian Embassy in Sofia, Report on Bulgarian-Cuban Relations

    Hungarian Ambassador to Bulgaria Karoly Prath summarizes developments on Bulgarian-Cuban relations gathered from Hungarian-Bulgarian diplomatic contacts. Bulgarian-Cuban relations were not adversely effected by the Cuban Missile Crisis. The relationship is dominated by economic development (e.g. the expansion of trade, specialist exchanges, Bulgarian loans to Cuba, the root causes of Cuba's economic difficulties). Prath also discusses Bulgarian concerns over the influence of China on Cuba.

  • October 01, 1963

    Report to Hungarian Politburo on Jamming of Western Radio

    This report prepared for the Hungarian Politburo in 1963 concluded that current jamming efforts were ineffective. It provided two options for the Politburo: to maintain and redirect jamming, focusing it on RFE, or to end it entirely.

  • October 02, 1963

    Report, Embassy of Hungary in North Korea to the Hungarian Foreign Ministry

    A report on the treatment of Soviet women involved in mixed marriages with North Koreans and cases of North Korean students seeking political asylum at the Embassy of the Soviet Union.

  • October 08, 1963

    Minutes of Hungarian Politburo Meeting on Jamming of Western Radio

    Politburo discussion of a report prepared for the Hungarian Politburo in1963 which concluded that current jamming efforts were ineffective. It provided two options for the Politburo: to maintain and redirect jamming, focusing it on RFE, or to end it entirely. Noteworthy is the assessment that the West has outstripped the Soviet bloc in terms of transmitters, and the assumption that ending jamming might be used as a bargaining chip to soften Western broadcasts.

  • November 20, 1963

    Minutes of the HSWP Political Committee Session - Views of Polish Leader Władysław Gomułka on the Cuban Proposal to Join the Warsaw Pact

    Władysław Gomułka views of Cuba’s proposal to the Warsaw Pact are recorded in the minutes of a HSWP Political Committee session. He explains why Poland opposes Cuba’s entry into the Warsaw Pact. The statements include concerns over the Federal Republic of Germany, nuclear and conventional weapons, and counter-revolution.

  • December 30, 1963

    Report, Embassy of Hungary in North Korea to the Hungarian Foreign Ministry

    The Hungarian Ambassador in North Korea reports on a meeting between Soviet Ambassador Moskovsky and Pak Seong-cheol in which the two discussed child rearing, agriculture, rural conditions, and industry in North Korea.

  • January 11, 1964

    Report, Embassy of Hungary in North Korea to the Hungarian Foreign Ministry

    Ambassadors from the Soviet Union, Hungary, and Romania discuss the zealousy of Koreans acquiring new technologies.

  • January 11, 1964

    Report, Embassy of Hungary in North Korea to the Hungarian Foreign Ministry

    In this report, Hungarian Ambassador to North Korea József Kovács details a conversation with Soviet Ambassador Moskovsky and Romanian Ambassador Bodnaras about the Soviet interpretation of North Korean-Chinese relations. Moskovsky states that his predecessors underestimated the situation.

  • March 10, 1964

    Report, Embassy of Hungary in North Korea to the Hungarian Foreign Ministry

    A report on a meeting between Nikita Khrushchev and the North Korean ambassador in which the two discussed the situation in South Korea.

  • June 01, 1964

    Report, Embassy of Hungary in North Korea to the Hungarian Foreign Ministry

    The Hungarian Ambassador to North Korea reports on persecution of individuals in North Korea, including intellectuals, former prisoners of war, merchants, and those who came from South Korea and/or Japan.