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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • September 15, 1949

    Telegram, Shtykov to Stalin

    A description of the political and economic situation in South and North Korea, and on the presence of the struggling democratic and reactionary forces and their influence among the people. Attached are three appendices on the combat and strength of the South Korean and the People's Army of North Korea, the amount of weapons in the People's Army, and the amount of ammunition in the People's Army as of August 1, 1949.

  • September 24, 1949

    Politburo Decision to Confirm the Following Directive to the Soviet Ambassador in Korea

    The Soviet Politburo argues that North Korea is not ready to launch a successful overthrow of the South Korean regime and suggests North Korea should concentrate its efforts on developing partisan groups in South Korea.

  • October 26, 1949

    Draft Reply to Mao Zedong's Telegram from Stalin via Molotov

    Stalin agrees with Mao Zedong that North Korea is not yet ready to launch an assault, and reports that the Soviet Union has told North Korea to concentrate on developing liberated areas and guerrillas in South Korea.

  • December 16, 1949

    Record of Conversation between I.V. Stalin and Chairman of the Central People's Government of the People's Republic of China Mao Zedong on 16 December 1949

    First meeting between Mao and Stalin. The two discuss war and peace, as well as the question of the new treaty between China and the USSR. Stalin voices himself against signing a new treaty, citing the Yalta agreement. Mao promises to reconsider his position. Mao says he is in favor of keeping Soviet troops in Port Arthur. Stalin promises not to "run away" from China. Mao requests a credit of 300 million dollars, as well as the Soviet aid in liberating Taiwan. Stalin warns Mao not to give the Americans a pretext to intervene in China. Mao says that several countries are interested in establishing diplomatic relations with China but that China should wait before doing so. Stalin agrees with this strategy.

  • December 24, 1949

    Report, Kovalev to Stalin

    Kovalev discusses seceral questions on the policy and pratice of the CCP CC. Topics include: data on the economic situation in the country, the Chinese working class, the Chinese peasantry and the land reform, the CCP, the Chinese press, the Chinese state apparatus, the Chinese army, the Chinese intelligentsia, the Chinese attitude toward the national bourgeoisie, the Chinese attitude toward foreign capital, the class struggle in China, and Chinese foreign policy.

  • December 29, 1949

    Telegram to Mao Zedong from Nie Rongzhen concerning the Repatriation of Ethnic Korean Soldiers to North Korea

    Lin Biao and others ask for instructions on whether to send ethnic Korean officers and soldiers to North Korea.

  • January 22, 1950

    Cable, Liu Shaoqi to Chairman Mao [Zedong]

    Liu Shaoqi reports to Mao Zedong that the ethnic Korean officers have arrived to bring back the ethnic Koreans to Korea. To the request of the North Korean officers in bringing back the weapons ethnic Korean officers had used, Mao responds in the affirmative.

  • January 22, 1950

    Record of Talks between I.V. Stalin and Chairman of the Central People's Government of the People’s Republic of China Mao Zedong

    Conversation between Stalin and Mao concerning a proposed treaty of friendship and alliance between the USSR and China. Discussion includes: the prospects of future Japanese aggression, the Chinese-Eastern Railway (Mao and Stalin disagree on who should run its administration), the Port Arthur agreements (including the question of the port of Dalny), and economic cooperation. The economic cooperation focuses on a Soviet credit program for economic development in China, as well as the question of arms shipments to China. There is also discussion of Tibet.

  • January 31, 1950

    Ciphered Telegram, Shtykov to Comrade Stalin

    As a response to Stalin's willingness to talk to Kim Il Sung on the issue of offensive attack to South Korea and on Stalin's request of lead, Kim Il Sung, according to Shtykov, responded that he would like to set up a meeting with him, and that he would take necessary measures for the lead to be delivered to the Soviet Union.

  • February 07, 1950

    Ciphered Telegram, Shtykov to Vyshinsky

    Shtykov relays to Vyshinsky Kim Il Sung's questions regarding the central committee's decision to issue a loan, on whether they can proceed toward forming more infantry, and on if North Korea could use in 1950 the credit the Soviet government had allocated for 1951. In answer to Kim Il Sung's requests, Shtykov answered ambiguously, stating that more thought needs to be put in.

  • February 10, 1950

    Ciphered Telegram, Shtykov to Vyshinsky, re: Meeting with Kim Il Sung

    Telegram from Shtykov to Vyshinsky reporting the results of his meeting on the same day with Kim Il Sung.

  • February 23, 1950

    Telegram from Shtykov to Maj. Gen. A.M. Vasilevsky, Head of Soviet Military Advisory group in DPRK

    Telegram from Shtykov to Vyshinsky reporting the arrival of Lieutenant-General Vasiliev and the transfer of military adviser duties from himself to Gen. Vasiliev.

  • March 09, 1950

    Telegram from Shtykov to Vyshinsky

    In a telegram to Shytykov which he then relays to Vyshinsky, Kim Il Sung writes that North Korea requests of the Soviet Union military and technical support. In return, North Korea is sending the natural resources such as gold and silver to Soviet Union. Kim requests that a

  • March 12, 1950

    Ciphered telegram, Vyshinsky to Soviet Ambassador in Pyongyang (Shtykov) transmitting a Message to Kim Il Sung

    Telegram from A. Vyshinsky to Soviet Ambassador in Pyongyang, Shtykov, to inform Kim Il Sung of reallocation of portion of 1951 credit (17 March 1949 agreement) to 1950.

  • March 16, 1950

    Telegram from Shtykov to Vyshinsky

    Shtykov transmits Kim Il Sung’s March 14 letter containing requests for credit in the form of arms and other military equipment.

  • March 18, 1950

    Message, Stalin to Kim Il Sung (via Shtykov)

    Stalin informs Kim Il Sung of the decision to approve of North Korean request of arms, equipment and specialist requests, per his March 4 message.

  • March 21, 1950

    Ciphered Telegram, Shtykov to Vyshinsky

    Shtykov reports on his meeting with Kim Il Sung where Kim Il Sung requests a meeting with Stalin in Moscow.

  • March 24, 1950

    Telegram, Shtykov to Vyshinskyy

    Shtykov informs Vyshinsky of Kim Il Sung's upcoming visit and the transportation arrangements.

  • April, 1950

    Record of a Conversation of Cde. Stalin with Kim Il Sung and Pak Heon-yeong

    Kim Il Sung and Stalin discuss the North Korean economy and Soviet-North Korean cooperation.

  • April 10, 1950

    Ciphered telegram, Soviet Representative Aleksei Ignatieff in Pyongyang to Vyshinsky

    In a discussion between Mao Zedong and Ri Ju-yeon, Mao expresses a positive attitude toward China-North Korea relations, though indicates he is unaware that Kim Il Sung was then in the Soviet Union.