Search in
ADD SEARCH FILTER CANCEL SEARCH FILTER

Digital Archive International History Declassified

SEARCH RESULTS

  • October 24, 1962

    Telegram from Polish Embassy in Havana (Jeleń), 24 October 1962

    On the Cuban Crisis situation, Jelen says that Soviet Ambassador Aleksandr Alekseyev is optimistic but Brazilian Ambassador Luis Bastian Pinto is concerned. Jelen also gives his own impressions of the crisis, saying that "There’s a relative run on the stores, but without any signs of panic and fears of the threat of military operations."

  • October 24, 1962

    Telegram from Polish Embassy in Moscow (Paszkowski), 24 October 1962

    Paszkowski discusses changes in the tensions of the Cuban Missile Crisis situation, including his opinion that the US's recent actions and rhetoric were a pre-election bluff.

  • October 24, 1962

    Orientation of Swiss officials on 22 October 1962 through the US Embassy in Berne

    An orientation of Swiss and US officials through the US Embassy in Berne.

  • October 24, 1962

    Telegram from the Brazilian Embassy in Washington (Campos), 5 p.m., Wednesday

    A telegram from the Brazilian Embassy in Washington suggesting that the inspection of Cuban territory should be transfered from the U.S. to an international group.

  • October 24, 1962

    Soviet Report to Reaction Inside the US to Kennedy's Decision to Blockade Cuba

    Report on the reaction among DC politicians to Kennedy's decision to blockade Cuba.

  • October 24, 1962

    Soviet Report on US Politicians Who Support Military Action Against Cuba

    KGB Chief Semichastny reports on US politicians who support military intervention in Cuba, including Nelson Rockefeller and the Pentagon leadership.

  • October 24, 1962

    Soviet Report on the Situation in the US Following Kennedy's Announcement

    Report on the situation in the US following Kennedy's announcement, including how the crisis is being presented in news media, increased security measures, the mood in New York City and protests occurring in response.

  • October 24, 1962

    Telegram from Yugoslav Embassy in Rio de Janeiro (Barišić) to Yugoslav Foreign Ministry

    A telegram from the Yugoslav Embassy in Rio de Janeiro to the Yugoslav Foreign Ministry discussing the Cuban Missile Crisis and U.S.-USSR-Cuban relations. It says, the "American arguments in favor of the military blockade of Cuba are: firstly, they have solid proof that Cuba will get atomic weapons; secondly, Kennedy must take more severe measures because of the internal pressure, that’s why his option is blockade, although he is trying to transfer this issue to the UNO [United Nations Organization] in order to alleviate the pressure on himself; thirdly, transferring Cuba’s issue to the UNO he is creating a precedent against unilateral USSR actions in Berlin."

  • October 24, 1962

    Letter from Khrushchev to John F. Kennedy

    Khrushchev expresses outrage at Kennedy’s establishment of quarantine in Cuba.

  • October 24, 1962

    Cable from Federal Republic of Germany Embassy, Washington (Knappstein)

    West German Ambassador Karl-Heinrich Knappstein in Washington, D.C. sends a report to Federal Minister Schröder about the Cuban crisis situation in both military and political terms. He discusses the presence of both American and Soviet submarines and aircraft in Cuba. He also discusses several of the diplomatic meetings that have taken place regarding the Cuban crisis - between Kennedy, Khrushchev, Rusk and others.

  • October 24, 1962

    Memorandum of Conversation between Chinese Vice Foreign Minister Zhang Hanfu and Chargé d’Affaires Counselor from the Embassy of North Korea in China Jeong Pung-gye

    Zhang informed Jeong Pung-gye of the details of the fighting along the Sino-Indian border as well as expressed support for Cuba regarding the Cuban Missile Crisis.

  • October 24, 1962

    Telegram from Soviet Ambassador to the USA Dobrynin to the USSR MFA

    Dobrynin relays the results of a meeting with R. Kennedy during which R. Kennedy is outraged at the “deception” of the Soviet Union by putting long-range missiles in Cuba.

  • October 25, 1962

    Telegram from Mexican Embassy, New Delhi

    A Mexican diplomat in New Delhi is requesting more information on Brazil’s offer to mediate Cuba conflict and the possibility of Mexico joining that mediation.

  • October 25, 1962

    Memorandum of Conversation between Mexican Foreign Ministry Official and Peruvian Diplomat, Mexico City

    The Peruvian Chargé d’affaires Mr. Don Carlos Pérez Cánepa, visited the Second Undersecretary [Pablo] Campos Ortiz. The Peruvian diplomat is inquiring what the Mexican point of view was regarding possible military action (in which all the republics of the continent would take part) against Cuba.

  • October 25, 1962

    Memorandum of Conversation between Mexican Foreign Ministry Official and Canadian Ambassador, Mexico City

    A meeting between the Mexican Foreign Ministry official and the Ambassador to Canada. The Canadian Ambassador says that planes from Cuba landing in Canada will be inspected for weapons, no planes from the Soviet Union will be allowed to flyover or land in Canada, and questions why the Mexican government voted the way it did on the US Resolution. To which the Mexican official replied that there were concerns over the use of military force against Cuba.

  • October 25, 1962

    Telegram from the Brazilian Embassy in Havana (Bastian Pinto), 12:45 p.m., Thursday

    An attempt to assure the Secretary of State for External Relations, at Minister Roa's request, of the total falsity of the accusation that, in Cuba, there exists any offensive armament and that Cuba solely desires effective guarantees in respect to its integrity and sovereignty and is ready even to dissolve its Army.

  • October 25, 1962

    Cable from Israeli Embassy, Prague, to Israeli Foreign Ministry, Jerusalem

    A cable from the Israeli Embassy in Prague about the Cuban crisis - public panic, long lines at stores to buy basic products (oil, sugar, salt, etc.) and many denunciations of U.S. policies by Cuban citizens.

  • October 25, 1962

    Telegram from Polish Embassy in Washington (Drozniak), 25 October 1962

    Drozniak discusses the ongoing Cuban Missile Crisis situation, including the rumors of a possible US military invasion of Cuba.

  • October 25, 1962

    Telegram from TROSTNIK (Soviet Defense Minister Rodion Malinovsky) to PAVLOV (General Isa Pliev)

    Malinovsky provides military instructions in response to US Navy blockading access to Cuba.

  • October 25, 1962

    Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union Presidium Protocol 61

    Protocol 61 indicates Khrushchev was already taking steps away from the crisis unfolding. Khrushchev decided that the ships carrying the IRBM missiles (the R-14s) on the high seas should turn around and come home.