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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • February 22, 1946

    George Kennan's 'Long Telegram'

    Ambassador George F. Kennan writes to the Secretary of State with a lengthy analysis of Soviet policy in an attempt to explain their recent uncooperative behavior. This message would later become famous as the "long telegram."

  • October 26, 1946

    Answers to the Questions of Mr. H. Bailey, President of the American Agency 'United Press'

    In an interview, Stalin discusses the political developments in Europe and the Soviet Union and the threat of conflict with the West. Particular emphasis is paid to Germany and Eastern Europe.

  • November 20, 1946

    Cable No. 641, Dekanozov to Cde. Stalin

    Dekanozov relates a conversation with Ambassador Smith, who indicated that President Truman was interested in control over nuclear energy. Smith would like to meet with Stalin when he returns from Sochi.

  • December 21, 1946

    Interview Transcript of Stalin's Interview With Elliot Roosevelt

    Roosevelt conducts an interview with Stalin and discusses US-Soviet relations and problems facing the post-war world.

  • January 17, 1947

    Report to Washington on Mongomery’s Conversation with Stalin

    Montgomery and Stalin discuss the possibility for future UK-USSR cooperation and ongoing US-UK relations.

  • September 04, 1947

    Letter, V.M. Molotov to George C. Marshall

    Molotov blames the Americans for the failure of the US-Soviet Joint Commission on Korea and rejects the latest proposals put forth by Robert A. Lovett.

  • October 12, 1947

    Incoming Cable No. 16, Malik to Cde. Stalin

    Stalin agrees to Malik's proposal regarding the situation in Korea, which calls for the creation of an All-Korean Temporary Assembly to resolve the peninsula's issues. The Soviet representative is to insist to the Americans that such a consultative body be established.

  • October 17, 1947

    Letter, Robert A. Lovett to V.M. Molotov

    Responding to Molotov's letter about Korea dated September 4, Lovett writes that the US will refer the Korean issue to the United Nations and forego further bilateral discussions with the USSR.

  • October 17, 1947

    George C. Marshall, 'A Program for a More Effective United Nations: Address by the Chief of the U.S. Delegation to the General Assembly'

    Marshall speaks about Greece, Palestine, and Korea, as well as the international control of atomic energy and the role and structure of the United Nations.

  • October 18, 1947

    Ciphered Telegram, Molotov to Cde. Stalin

    Molotov reports his answers to several questions from Vyshinsky: he advises not to be so contentious with Marshall on private questions. On the Korean issues, Vyshinsky should remind the Americans about the terms of the December agreements calling for a united, democratic Korea and that Marshall's new proposals at the UN constitute a violation of these agreements. He approves Vyshinsky's position on the veto and the peace and security committee.

  • September 18, 1947

    Text of Speech Delivered by A.Y. Vyshinsky at the General Assembly of the United Nations, September 18, 1947

    The Soviet Union's response to George Marshall's September 17, 1947, speech at the UNGA. Vyshinsky offers the Soviet Union's position on arms control, nuclear weapons, the UN, Korea, Greece, and other issues raised by Marshall

  • October 20, 1947

    Ciphered Telegram, Molotov to Cde. Stalin

    Molotov relates how the Americans have rejected the Soviet position toward establishing a temporary all Korean assembly. While there is some overlap between both positions, this issue has now been exacerbated by Marshall's move to decide it in the UNGA. The Soviets should respond to this move by reiterating their commitment to a self-determined form of government for Korea, which requires the Soviets and Americans to withdraw their troops.

  • October 23, 1947

    Draft of Telegram to Vyshinsky on the Korean Question

    Vyshinsky is instructed that, because the Korean issue is already on the UNSC agenda, it should remain there. Vyshinsky should stake out a position that both American and Soviet troops withdraw simultaneously, allowing the Koreans to develop a unified government. Elected representatives from both Koreas should be invited to discussions. A time span for the troop withdrawals must be set. The draft includes some scrawled recommendations from Stalin.

  • October 29, 1947

    Telegram No. 293, V. Molotov to Cde. Stalin

    Molotov writes that Vyshinsky must insist on the Koreans being invited to any discussion on removing foreign troops from Korea. If opposition to such participation holds, the Soviets should abstain from voting on the matter out of principle.

  • October 29, 1947

    Telegram No. 418 from Vyshinsky

    Vyshinsky outlines the amendment that the US has introduced regarding the Korean question. Moreover, Vyshinsky asserts the plan to object to the amendment and express why the amendment is not compatible with the proposal of the Soviets.

  • October 29, 1947

    Telegram No. 423, Vyshinsky to Cde. Molotov

    Vyshinsky clarifies that in case there is a decision to form a commission in Korea, it is not advisable for the US and the Soviets to take part. Vyshinsky requests for an answer on this issue.

  • October 29, 1947

    Telegram, V. Molotov to Cde. Stalin

    V. Molotov states the importance that the Korean issue should be discussed with the Koreans. He also details that in the case of opposing proposals from the US, the Soviets should oppose and abstain rather than voting against them.

  • October 29, 1947

    Telegram Nos. 408-411, Vyshinsky to Molotov

    Vyshinsky outlines the proceedings at the UN, where discussion of the Korean question and the withdrawal of Foreign troops from Korea has led the Soviets to insist that the Koreans be invited to the discussions. He details counter proposals from the Americans, and Soviet responses to these resolutions.

  • October 30, 1947

    Telegram, V. Molotov to Cde. Stalin

    V. Molotov states the importance that the Korean issue should be discussed with the Koreans. He also details that in the case the amendments are approved, the Soviet Union will not take part in the work of the US proposed committee. He also details that in the case the amendments are approved, the Soviet Union will not take part in the work of the US proposed committee.

  • March 14, 1948

    Stenographic Record of a Speech by Comrade J. V. Stalin at a Special Session of the Politburo, March 14, 1948

    Speech by Stalin to a special session of the Politburo. He argues that because of differing ideologies between the USSR and the United States, hostilities are inevitable and, for that reason, the country's military should be enlarged. He praises the example set by the Chinese communist movement, and notes that India should be where the Soviet Union directs its attention to next. Brian Murray questions the validity of the document in CWIHP Working Paper No. 12, where the document was first published.