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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • October 25, 1962

    Political Letter from Ambassador Max Troendle to Secretary General Pierre Micheli

    A political letter from Ambassador Max Troendle to Secretary General Pierre Micheli describing aspects of the Soviet position on the Cuban crisis and how "It seems that on Cuba, the Soviets want to avoid meeting the American challenge, that they want to negotiate, talk, and not to face a showdown."

  • October 25, 1962

    Telegram from the Brazilian Foreign Ministry to the Brazilian Embassy in Washington

    A telegram from the Brazilian Foreign Ministry to the Brazilian Embassy in Washington relaying a message from the Brazilian Embassy in Moscow regarding their interpretations of the Soviet Union's position on the events related to the Cuban Missile Crisis and U.S.-Cuban relations. The ambassador feels that the Soviets fear war more than the North-Americans; and he says that at no point does the Soviet government specifically refute the NorthAmerican affirmation that it is sending an amount of offensive armament with Cuba, limiting itself to reiterating that the Cuban-Soviet accord of 3 September for defensive military help to Cuba continues in force.

  • October 25, 1962

    Telegram from Soviet Ambassador to Cuba Alekseev to USSR Foreign Ministry

    Alekseev comments on the general attitude of the Cuban people in regards to the blockade and mobilization of the Cuban army

  • October 25, 1962

    Telegram from Soviet delegate to the United Nations V. A. Zorin to USSR Foreign Ministry

    Preparation for an upcoming meeting with acting UN Secretary U Thant, a meeting with the Soviet Union that will take place between U Thant’s meetings with the US and Cuba. Zorin says they will transmit Khrushchev’s message during the meeting that the Soviet agrees with U Thant’s proposal of holding a negotiation for a peaceful settlement in the Caribbean region. He also says the Soviet should expect the US would not agree to the suspension of “quarantine” activity only after the removal of “offensive weaponry” from Cuba. Soviet, however, would insist the negotiation to be based on U Thant’s proposal of suspending arms stockpiling in Cuba, which is supported by neutral countries.

  • October 25, 1962

    Telegram from Soviet delegate to the United Nations V. A. Zorin to USSR Foreign Ministry on UN Security Council Meeting of 24 October 1962

    Zorin transmits the events of the 24 October meeting relaying the speeches of British, French, Romanian, Chilean, Ghanaian, etc delegates. Zorin argues that delegates from Venezuela and Chile supported the American draft resolution under the US pressure. The United Arab Republic and Ghana stressed the US actions against Cuba violated the principle of maritime freedom and posed a threat to security. UN Acting Secretary-General U Thant proposed the interested parties meet and discuss the situation within several weeks. Zorin also relays that a number of neutral Afro-Asian countries are working on a new draft resolution.

  • October 25, 1962

    Minutes of the Meeting of the Hungarian Revolutionary Worker’s and Peasant’s Government (Council of Ministers)

    The document includes Hungarian Council of Ministers meeting minutes from 25 October 1962. The minutes are dominated by János Kádár’s detailed overview of events leading up to the current international situation. The overview is preceded by the Council of Ministers approving the government’s public statement on the Cuban Missille Crisis. During the session Kádár summarizes US provocation, Cuban and Soviet responses, and the military mobilization of different countries and military alliances, and Hungary’s political campaign in support of Cuba. Kádár notes negotiations between Cuba, the US, and Soviet Union initiate the day before. The minutes also include exchanges between Kádár and other Council of Ministers representatives.

  • October 26, 1962

    Telegram from Polish Embassy in Washington (Drozniak), 26 October 1962

    According to Drozniak, US Secretary of State Dean Rusk has allegedly reported that the latest statements of journalists claiming the relaxation of tensions in the Cuban Missile Crisis do not correspond to the reality of serious tensions between the US and USSR.

  • October 26, 1962

    Telegram from Soviet delegate to the UN Zorin to USSR Foreign Ministry (3) on the meeting between Garcia-Inchaustegui and U Thant on October 26, 1962

    The meeting between the Cuban delegate to the UN Garcia-Inchaustegui and U Thant.

  • October 26, 1962

    Telegram from Fidel Castro to N. S. Khrushchev

    In his message to Khrushchev, Fidel Castro evaluated the two possible scenarios of American aggression against Cuba. Castro seems to suggest a retaliatory nuclear strike against the US in the case of an attack on Cuba.

  • October 26, 1962

    Telegram from East German Ambassador, Moscow, to East German Secretary of State (First Deputy Foreign Minister) Otto Winzer

    The East German Ambassador in Moscow, Rudolf Dölling, writes to the East German Secretary of State (First Deputy Foreign Minister), Otto Winzer, about several diplomatic meetings that have been held concerning US-Cuban relations and tensions. One of these meetings is between several Eastern European countries: East Germany, Poland, Bulgaria, USSR, Romania and Czechoslovakia.

  • October 26, 1962

    Memorandum of Conversation, West German Foreign Minister Gerhard Schröder and Soviet Ambassador Andrei Smirnov, Bonn

    A discussion between Federal Minister Schröder and Soviet Ambassador Smirnow [Smirnov] in which Smirnov presents to the minister a statement of the Soviet Government concerning the aggressive acts the United States had committed against the Republic of Cuba. In this statement the Soviet Government was explaining its view on the blockade the United States had imposed on Cuba. It also commented on the other aggressive steps President Kennedy intended to take against Cuba as announced on 22 October.

  • October 27, 1962

    Ciphered Telegram from Soviet Ambassador to Cuba Aleksandr Alekseev

    A telegram dispatched from the Soviet embassy in Havana early on the morning of Saturday, 27 October 1962. Fidel Castro was at the embassy and composing an important "personal" message for Nikita Khrushchev. The alarmed Cuban leader anticipated US invasion in the next "24-72 hours."

  • October 27, 1962

    Cable from Soviet Foreign Minister Gromyko to USSR Ambassador to Cuba Alekseev

    A message from Gromyko to Alekseev to relay a message to Castro regarding American invasion.

  • October 27, 1962

    Telegram from Soviet Ambassador to the USA Dobrynin to the USSR MFA

    Dobrynin relays the mood of the American capital and the presence of a real possibility of US incursion in Cuba.

  • October 27, 1962

    Telegram from Soviet Ambassador to Cuba A.I. Alekseev to USSR Foreign Ministry

    Castro’s response to a Soviet Foreign Ministry telegram regarding the prohibition of special arms and possible US invasion.

  • October 27, 1962

    Cable from Federal Republic of Germany Embassy, Washington (Knappstein)

    A cable from the West German Embassy in Washington, D.C. discussing the threat to American security posed by an "offensive" Soviet base in Cuba, insights provided by recent intelligence, the purpose and the impact of the American blockade of Cuba, negotiations that have taken place at the United Nations, Soviet intentions during the Cuban crisis and, finally, a comparison of Cuba to the situation in Berlin.

  • October 28, 1962

    Memorandum from S. P. Ivanov and R. Malinovsky to N. S. Khrushchev

    Malinovsky and S.P. Ivanov report the shooting down of an American aircraft, which had taken surveillance pictures of the disposition of troops on Cuba.

  • October 28, 1962

    Cable from Soviet Foreign Minister Gromyko to USSR Ambassador to Cuba Alekseev

    Gromyko asks Alekseev to relay a message to Castro regarding U Thant’s possible visit.

  • October 28, 1962

    Soviet Foreign Minister Gromyko's Instructions to the USSR Ambassador to the USA

    Gromyko instructs Dobrynin to tell R. Kennedy N.S. Khruchev’s response to John F. Kennedy’s 27 October message.

  • October 28, 1962

    Soviet Foreign Minister Gromyko's Instructions to the USSR representative at the United Nations

    Gromyko sends instructions to Zorin regarding negotiations and UN inspections in Cuba.