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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • October 23, 1962

    Telegram from the Brazilian Embassy in Washington (Campos)

    A report on Secretary of State Dean Rusk's discussion of the severity of the American reaction to the installation of remote-controlled missiles of medium and intermediate range in Cuba by the Soviet Union.

  • October 23, 1962

    Telegram from Swiss Ambassador in Washington Lindt regarding briefing by Assistant Secretary of State William Tyler

    Before a briefing of the neutral ambassadors by US Secretary of State Dean Rusk, William Tyler, Assistant Secretary for European Affairs, asks the Swiss diplomat to meet with him. After Tyler expressed thanks on behalf of the USA for what Switzerland has done, and will yet do in the future, for the American interests in Cuba, he said that he wished to inform the Swiss official more extensively than Rusk would be able to do in front of the assembled group of ambassadors. They mostly discuss Soviet missile deployed in Cuba.

  • October 23, 1962

    Memorandum of Conversation, Federal Republic of Germany Chancellor Konrad Adenauer and Dean Acheson, Special Envoy of US President Kennedy, Bonn, West Germany

    A conversation between Federal Chancellor Adenauer with the Special Adviser of the U.S. President, Acheson. They discuss plans to destabilize the Cuban regime by domestic unrest, how the missile bases in Cuba should be destroyed, Russian soldiers stationed in Cuba and the lasting impact of the Bay of Pigs landing.

  • October 23, 1962

    Record of Socialist Unity Party of Germany (SED) Central Committee Politburo Meeting

    A meeting between the Politburo members of the East German Central Committee (CC GDR) concerning US imperialist actions against Cuba, meaning the economic sanctions and blockade. The GDR Politburo members express their strong support of Cuba.

  • October 24, 1962

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy in Cuba, 'Report of a Conversation with Cuban Interior Minister'

    The Cuban Interior Minister is telling the Chinese embassy officials about U.S. combat readiness and active troop deployments to Cuba/Guantanamo.

  • October 24, 1962

    Telegram from Yugoslav Embassy in Rio de Janeiro (Barišić) to Yugoslav Foreign Ministry

    A telegram from the Yugoslav Embassy in Rio de Janeiro to the Yugoslav Foreign Ministry relaying a message from "Brazilian Ambassador in Washington [Roberto de Oliveira Campos] says that the USA is getting ready for military intervention in Cuba. The approximate plan is that US planes will start bombing Cuba in the places where there are alleged bases with nuclear weapons and that will be as soon as Cuba refuses to accept the UN Commission for disarmament."

  • October 24, 1962

    Telegram from Polish Embassy in Havana (Jeleń), 24 October 1962

    On the Cuban Crisis situation, Jelen says that Soviet Ambassador Aleksandr Alekseyev is optimistic but Brazilian Ambassador Luis Bastian Pinto is concerned. Jelen also gives his own impressions of the crisis, saying that "There’s a relative run on the stores, but without any signs of panic and fears of the threat of military operations."

  • October 24, 1962

    Telegram from Polish Embassy in Moscow (Paszkowski), 24 October 1962

    Paszkowski discusses changes in the tensions of the Cuban Missile Crisis situation, including his opinion that the US's recent actions and rhetoric were a pre-election bluff.

  • October 24, 1962

    Telegram from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the USSR, to USSR envoys and the USSR delegate to the UN.

    The Soviet Ministry of Foreign Affairs ordered its ambassadors to visit the local ministers of foreign affairs and inform them of the declaration of the USSR on the situation in Cuba and its decision to bring the American violation of the UN charter before the UN.

  • October 24, 1962

    Telegram from the Brazilian Embassy in Washington (Campos), 5 p.m., Wednesday

    A telegram from the Brazilian Embassy in Washington suggesting that the inspection of Cuban territory should be transfered from the U.S. to an international group.

  • October 24, 1962

    Telegram from the Soviet Ministry of Foreign Affairs to V. V. Kuznetsov on a message from U Thant

    The Soviet Ministry of Foreign Affairs relayed a message from U Thant: The delegates of a large number of countries urged the involved parties to restrain from any actions that can exacerbate the situation. They also called for a voluntary suspension of quarantines for the inspection of ships bound for Cuba.

  • October 24, 1962

    Soviet Report to Reaction Inside the US to Kennedy's Decision to Blockade Cuba

    Report on the reaction among DC politicians to Kennedy's decision to blockade Cuba.

  • October 24, 1962

    Soviet Report on US Politicians Who Support Military Action Against Cuba

    KGB Chief Semichastny reports on US politicians who support military intervention in Cuba, including Nelson Rockefeller and the Pentagon leadership.

  • October 24, 1962

    Soviet Report on the Situation in the US Following Kennedy's Announcement

    Report on the situation in the US following Kennedy's announcement, including how the crisis is being presented in news media, increased security measures, the mood in New York City and protests occurring in response.

  • October 24, 1962

    Telegram from Yugoslav Embassy in Rio de Janeiro (Barišić) to Yugoslav Foreign Ministry

    A telegram from the Yugoslav Embassy in Rio de Janeiro to the Yugoslav Foreign Ministry discussing the Cuban Missile Crisis and U.S.-USSR-Cuban relations. It says, the "American arguments in favor of the military blockade of Cuba are: firstly, they have solid proof that Cuba will get atomic weapons; secondly, Kennedy must take more severe measures because of the internal pressure, that’s why his option is blockade, although he is trying to transfer this issue to the UNO [United Nations Organization] in order to alleviate the pressure on himself; thirdly, transferring Cuba’s issue to the UNO he is creating a precedent against unilateral USSR actions in Berlin."

  • October 24, 1962

    Cable from Federal Republic of Germany Embassy, Washington (Knappstein)

    West German Ambassador Karl-Heinrich Knappstein in Washington, D.C. sends a report to Federal Minister Schröder about the Cuban crisis situation in both military and political terms. He discusses the presence of both American and Soviet submarines and aircraft in Cuba. He also discusses several of the diplomatic meetings that have taken place regarding the Cuban crisis - between Kennedy, Khrushchev, Rusk and others.

  • October 25, 1962

    Telegram from the Brazilian Embassy in Havana (Bastian Pinto), 12:45 p.m., Thursday

    An attempt to assure the Secretary of State for External Relations, at Minister Roa's request, of the total falsity of the accusation that, in Cuba, there exists any offensive armament and that Cuba solely desires effective guarantees in respect to its integrity and sovereignty and is ready even to dissolve its Army.

  • October 25, 1962

    Telegram from Yugoslav Embassy in Rio de Janeiro (Barišić) to Yugoslav Foreign Ministry

    A telegram from the Yugoslav Embassy in Rio de Janeiro to the Yugoslav Foreign Ministry about meeting with Brazilian officials to discuss the US preparing a military invasion of Cuba.

  • October 25, 1962

    Telegram from Yugoslav Embassy in Havana (Vidaković) to Yugoslav Foreign Ministry

    A telegram from Yugoslav Embassy in Havana to the Yugoslav Foreign Ministry describing Vidaković's meeting with Brazilian Ambassador Pinto. They mostly discussed the Cuban crisis in relation to decisions made in the Organization of American States (OAS) councils.

  • October 25, 1962

    Telegram from the Brazilian Foreign Ministry to the Brazilian Embassy in Washington

    A telegram from the Brazilian Foreign Ministry to the Brazilian Embassy in Washington relaying a message from the Brazilian Embassy in Moscow regarding their interpretations of the Soviet Union's position on the events related to the Cuban Missile Crisis and U.S.-Cuban relations. The ambassador feels that the Soviets fear war more than the North-Americans; and he says that at no point does the Soviet government specifically refute the NorthAmerican affirmation that it is sending an amount of offensive armament with Cuba, limiting itself to reiterating that the Cuban-Soviet accord of 3 September for defensive military help to Cuba continues in force.