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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • January 29, 1982

    Intelligence Information Cable, 'Relationship between the Polish Ministry of National Defense and the Ministry of Internal Affairs'

    Cable includes information on the acceptance of KGB advisors, military appointments, and resistance to Soviet penetration.

  • February 26, 1982

    Intelligence Information Cable, 'Comments on a Recent Photograph of the Polish Military Council of National Salvation'

    Report analyzes power dynamics and change in the Polish military from a photo TIME magazine published in their February 1, 1982 issue.

  • April 05, 1982

    Intelligence Information Cable, 'The Polish National Defense Committee'

    Report outlines the various components of the National Defense Committee (KOK) including its Secretariat, leadership, and possible consequences.

  • May 13, 1982

    Intelligence Information Cable, 'Relationship between Soviet Military Representation to Poland and the Polish General Staff'

    Report explains the previously waning influence of Soviet officers on the Polish military, discussing their housing, decreasing size and role in the Polish armed forces.

  • January 01, 1983

    Central Intelligence Agency, 'Jaruzelski's Attitude, Behavior, and Style'

    Details Jaruzelski's personal habits, style, and evolving political views.

  • June 24, 1984

    Memorandum from Max Hugel to the Secretaries of State and Defense and Director of the National Security Agency, 'Attitudes of the Polish Ministry of Defense and Soviet Military Positions in Connection with the Current Political Situation in Poland'

    Report discusses conflicting reports from the Polish and Soviet governments on the stationing of troops in Poland.

  • June 05, 1989

    Transcript of the Central Committee Secretariat Meeting of the Polish United Workers Party (PZPR)

    On the day after Solidarity had swept Poland’s first open elections, ultimately winning 99 of 100 Senate seats, the Polish Communists vent their shock and dismay ("a bitter lesson," "the party are not connected with the masses," "We trusted the Church and they turned out to be Jesuits" were typical comments). Comrade Kwasniewski (who was later elected President of Poland) remarks that "It’s well known that also party members were crossing out our candidates" (only two out of 35 Party candidates survived the epidemic of X’s). But they see no choice but to negotiate a coalition government, and specifically "[w]arn against attempts at destabilization, pointing at the situation in China" -- since the Tiananmen massacre occurred the same day as the Polish elections, the road not taken.