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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • September 21, 1965

    National Science Committee, Briefings on Receiving Foreign Guests, No. 3

    Continued report on visit of Atomic Energy Group of the Indonesian Economic Delegation. Describes a visit made by the Indonesian delegation to a number of sites, including a nuclear reactor, multiple laboratories, and a computer science research institute at Tsinghua University. The report notes that the head of the Indonesian group was a member of the Air Force, confirming that part of the delegation consists of "military men." Also summarizes questions raised by one of the group members.

  • September 23, 1965

    National Science Committee, Briefings on Receiving Foreign Guests, No. 4

    4th report on the visit of the Atomic Energy Group of the Indonesian Economic Delegation. Summarizes the group's visit to various science departments at Peking University, and the visit to laboratories of nuclear physics, electronics, and radiation chemistry, along with several other science department laboratories. Describes the "very positive reactions" of the visiting group, and the group's request to send Indonesian exchange students to Peking University.

  • September 25, 1965

    National Science Committee, Briefings on Receiving Foreign Guests, No. 7

    7th report on the visit of the Atomic Energy Group of the Indonesian Economic Delegation. Indonesian atomic energy group visits the No. 2 Institute of Atomic Energy Research in China, touring various facilities in the institute including a heavy water reactor built with Soviet aid. Report notes the group's satisfaction with the visit.

  • September 25, 1965

    National Science Committee, Briefings on Receiving Foreign Guests, No. 6

    6th report on the visit of the Atomic Energy Group of the Indonesian Economic Delegation. Describes the group's visit to China's No. 1 Institute of Atomic Energy Research. Report goes on to relate questions raised by group members about atomic energy related organizations in China, and describes the screening of a documentary on the first successful explosion of a Chinese atomic bomb.

  • January, 1966

    Excerpt of an Indian Document on Chinese Nuclear Delivery Capability

    An excerpt of a document recovered from the Air India 101 crash assessing China's military capabilities.

  • August 02, 1966

    Rajya Sabha Q&A on Chinese Nuclear Tests and their Immediate Effects on the Indian Population

    Transcript of questions and answers between members of the Rajya Sabha and the Prime Minister Shrimati Indira Gandhi on the dangerous effects of the Chinese nuclear tests on the Indian population.

  • November 16, 1966

    Telegram number 3725-59 from M. Lucien Paye

    Lucien Paye, upon departing China, meets with Foreign Minister Chen Yi to discuss the Red Guard movement, Sino-French relations, and the Vietnam War, among other topics.

  • 1967

    CSSR Ministry of Foreign Affairs, 'Information: The Most Recent Developments in the Chinese People’s Republic and the CSSR-Chinese Relations'

    Extensive account of CSSR-Chinese relations, including controversy surrounding the Cultural Revolution and Chinese extremism, anti-Soviet proclivities within the Chinese leadership, and the Chinese hydrogen bomb test on June 17th.

  • January 11, 1967

    Intelligence Note 13 from Thomas L. Hughes to the Secretary, 'The Chinese Nuclear Threat to Non-Communist Asia'

    Prepared by Edward Hurwitz, a Foreign Service officer and future ambassador then on assignment to INR, this report treated ICBMs as China’s main weapons goal, an eventual means for a “credible threat” to Beijing’s U.S. and Soviet “arch enemies.”

  • March 27, 1967

    Intelligence Note 242 from George C. Denney, Jr., to the Secretary, 'Peking May Have ICBMs in 1971'

    Years before Beijing actually deployed an ICBM in 1981, US intelligence estimated the possibility of the deployment of a “few operable, though probably relatively inefficient missiles” as early as 1971.

  • February 01, 1968

    Informational Report by Ambassador Herrmann

    As North Koreans prepared for a new war after the Pueblo Incident, East German Ambassador Herrmann explains that the USSR and PRC will fight with nuclear weapons on the DPRK's side.

  • November 27, 1969

    Rajya Sabha Q&A on Specific Features of Chinese September 1969 Nuclear Tests

    Transcript of questions and answers between members of the Rajya Sabha and the Prime Minister of Atomic Affairs on the signifigant features of the 9th and 10th nuclear explosions conducted by China on the 22nd and the 29th of September, 1969.

  • November 11, 1970

    Rajya Sabha Q&A on India's Stance on Chinese Nuclear Tests

    Transcript of question and answers between members of the Rajya Sabha and the Deputy Minister of External Affairs on the governments stance of Chinese nuclear tests.

  • November 26, 1970

    Rajya Sabha Q&A on International Underground Nuclear Test Bans

    Transcript of questions and answers between members of the Rayja Sabha and the Prime Minister, Shrimati Indira Gandhi, on the current international bans on underground nuclear tests and if India plans to renew its policy on underground nuclear tests.

  • November 26, 1970

    Rajya Sabha Q&A on India's Nuclear Program in Respect to China and Pakistan

    Transcript of questions and answers between members of Rajya Sabha and the Minister of Atomic Energy, Shrimati Indira Gandhi, on the plan to continue India's nuclear policy in respect to Pakistan's promise to use American arms to resolve the Kashmir situation as well as China's latest achievements in the nuclear field.

  • November 23, 1971

    Rajya Sabha Q&A on Chinese Proliferation of Nuclear Missiles

    Transcript of questions and answers between members of the Rajya Sabha and the Minister of Defence on Chinese success in producing nuclear missiles.

  • July 03, 1972

    East German Report on the Fifth Interkit Meeting in Prague, July 1972

    This East German report, issued after the Interkit meeting in Prague, addresses the domestic and foreign policies of China. It makes reference to internal conflicts destabilizing the Chinese leadership. China is said to be enhancing its military potential, especially in the area of missiles and nuclear weapons. Its aims in foreign policy are to acquire a leadership position in the so-called "Third World", to expand its relations with capitalist countries, to damage the unity of the Socialist bloc, and to obstruct the foreign relations of the Soviet Union. Considering the increase of influence of China on North Korea, Romania, and Vietnam, as well as on the Communist parties in Spain and Italy, the Socialist countries must improve their anti-Maoist propaganda efforts.

  • June 06, 1973

    Telex from Ambassador Pauls, Beijing, to Foreign Office

    Ambassador Pauls reports a conversation with Chinese Deputy Foreign Minister Qiao Guanhua about the possibility of a Soviet attack on China and Chinese "Second strike capability."

  • August 03, 1973

    Rajya Sabha Q&A on Recent Chinese Nuclear Attacks and the Indian Government's Position

    Transcript of questions and answers between members of the Rajya Sabha and the Minister of Defence Shri Jagjivan Ram on the Indian government's stance and actions to be taken in response to CHinese nuclear tests.

  • November 03, 1973

    Cablegram from the Australian Embassy Peking, 'Prime Minister's Call on Chairman Mao'

    A "slow but articulate" Mao discuss nuclear weapons testing, Taiwan, and the Lin Biao affair with E.G. Whitlam.