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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • November 14, 1984

    Protocol resulting from discussions between the Interior Ministry of the Czechoslovak Socialist Republic and the KGB of the Soviet Union

    Both parties discuss the detection of and preparation for a surprise nuclear rocket attack by the USA on socialist countries, the intentions of the main hostile countries- the USA, other NATO countries, the People’s Republic of China- and cooperation to fight ideological diversion from hostile countries and emigrant populations. The two also agree to economic, tourism and cultural exchanges.

  • December 07, 1984

    Chief of the Pasvalys Regional Branch of the KGB of the Lithuanian SSR Lt. Colonel S. Saveikis, 'A Plan for the Individual Training of a Young Officer of the State Security Service'

    This document provides a set of instructions concerning the matters that a newly-recruited state security officer who has not gone through the Chekist educational system needs to know in order to perform his Chekist duties in the successful manner.

  • June 10, 1985

    Speech, East German Minister of State Security Mielke, 'At the Enlarged Collegium Meeting on 7 June 1985 about Further Preparation of the XI SED Party Congress'

    This speech by East German Minister of State Security Mielke is about technological, intellectual, and ideological preparations for war by the west and how to uncover and organize indicators of a potential attack.

  • October 25, 1985

    Cooperative plan between the Interior Ministry of the Czechoslovak Socialist Republic and the Soviet KGB for the summer of 1986-1990

    This agreement acknowledges the alleged use of post as a method used by subversives to act against the Czechoslovak Socialist Republic and the Soviet Union. Both parties agree to exchange information after evaluating the effectiveness of their work in this area and plan to prolong the existing cooperative agreement.

  • December 30, 1985

    Bulgarian Interior Minister Visits Moscow to Coordinate Activities against Foreign Propaganda Operations

    This note regarding the results of the visit of a group of Interior Ministry officials to the KGB in Moscow contains a proposal to develop a coordinated plan to discredit RFE and RL.

  • May 06, 1986

    Ministry of State Security (Stasi), 'Report on Development and Achieved State of Work Regarding Early Recognition of Adversarial Attack and Surprise Intentions (Complex RYAN)'

    This report by Ministry of State Security describes developments and achievements toward early recognition of a surprise nuclear missile attack on the USSR (Complex RYAN).

  • August 27, 1986

    Comprehensive Plan of cooperation of USSR KGB 1st Main Directorate Departments with the 1st Directorate of the CSSR FMVD concerning the organization of agent operational work in the countries of the Near East between 1986 and 1990

    Cooperative agreement with a focus on shared intelligence work in the "Near East against the US, Britain, the FRG, France, and the other NATO countries, and also against Israel, the Arab countries, and Arab political forces and organizations."

  • November 10, 1986

    Letter, East German Minister of State Security Mielke to KGB Chairman Viktor Chebrikov

    This letter, from East German Minister of State Security Mielke to KGB Chairman Chebrikov, requests a consultation on the development and continuation of Complex RYAN, especially on furthering collaboration between the MfS and KGB.

  • January 20, 1987

    Ministry of State Security (Stasi), Plan for Consultations with the Delegation of the KGB

    This document is a plan for the consultations to take place in Berlin between the Stasi and the KBG. It includes objectives and proposed theses on the subject of early recognition of a sudden nuclear missile attack by the adversary.

  • March 24, 1987

    Information Summary: 'On the Measures for Counteracting Ideological Diversions against the Soviet Baltic Republics'

    In February 1987, the Politburo of the Central Committee of the Soviet Communist Party – the supreme political authority in the Soviet Union – sought to address the ever-growing vocal support in the international community for the independence of the Baltic republics (Lithuania, Latvia, and Estonia). The resulting Politburo decree, titled “On the Measures for Counteracting Ideological Diversions against the Soviet Baltic Republics,” was summarized for the KGB of the Lithuanian Soviet Socialist Republic by Lt. Colonel Vilius P. Kontrimas, deputy chief of the First Department (foreign intelligence) on March 24, 1987.

  • September 26, 1987

    Stasi Note on Meeting Between Minister Mielke and Head of the KGB 5th Directorate Abramov

    Meeting between the head of the KGB’s Fifth Chief Directorate, Major General Abramov, and Minister for State Security Mielke, especially on changes in Soviet policy following Mikhail Gorbachev’s accession to power. They discuss the increase in dissident activity, public demonstrations, and subversive organizations.

  • June 20, 1988

    Anatoly Chernyaev, Notes from a Meeting of the Politburo

    Anatoly Chernyaev’s notes from the Politburo session on June 20, 1988, during which military spending, party membership, the progress of perestroika, and CPSU organizational leadership were discussed.

  • October 19, 1988

    Chief of the 1st Department of the KGB of the Lithuanian SSR Colonel V. L. Karinau,'A Plan of Counterpropaganda Measures to Explain to the Population of the Republic the Fundamentals of the Political Processes in Lithuania in the 1930s and the 1940s'

    A plan to celebrate the 70th anniversary of the Soviet regime in Lithuiana calls for the publication of a series of articles in the major Lithuanian newspapers on four topics.

  • March 01, 1989

    Outgoing Cipher Telegram No. 3441 from the KGB of the Lithuanian SSR to Deputy Chief of the Service “A” PGU KGB Colonel Comrade Sotskov M. A., 'On Conducting Joint Active and Counterpropaganda Measures'

    Karinauskas dispatched top-secret cipher telegram No. 3441 to the deputy chief of the Service A, Colonel M. A. Sotskov [Lev F. Sotskov], informing him of the measures the Lithuanian KGB planned to implement to tarnish the cause of Lithuanian independence

  • July 24, 1989

    Decision of the Moldavian KGB Collegium, On the Implementation Status by KGB MSSR Section 5 'Fulfillment of the Directives of the XXVIIth CPSU Congress on the Intensification of Ideological-Educational Work'

    Report by the Moldavian KGB on the decisions it had implemented of the USSR KGB Collegium from the previous year. Includes work to counter Romanian nationalist propaganda. Romania is referred to by the code name "Objective 24." General-Lieutenant G.M. Volkov, the Chairman of the Moldavian SSR KGB, maintained that an all-out offensive was required, including the use of “persons of trust from among the ranks of people of science, culture and art,” in order to neutralize “the subversive activity of the adversary” by identifying and isolating the “emissaries of the adversary” and imposing “permanent and reliable operational control” over them.

  • August 10, 1989

    National Intelligence Daily for Thursday, 10 August 1989

    The CIA’s National Intelligence Daily for 10 August 1989 describes the latest developments in Israel, Lebanon, Iran, Panama, the Soviet Union, China, Thailand, India, Pakistan, Afghanistan, South Korea, and West Germany.

  • August 30, 1989

    Agreement Concerning Cooperation between the CSSR Federal Ministry of Internal Affairs and the Committee for State Security of the USSR

    Cooperative and intelligence sharing agreement.

  • July 21, 1990

    National Intelligence Daily for Saturday, 21 July 1990

    The CIA’s National Intelligence Daily for 21 July 1990 describes the latest developments in Iraq, Liberia, Koreas, the Soviet Union, Romania, Bulgaria and Panama.

  • August 02, 1991

    National Intelligence Daily for Friday, 2 August 1991

    The CIA’s National Intelligence Daily for 2 August 1991 describes the latest developments in Iraq, Kuwait, the Soviet Union, Yugoslavia, Lebanon, France, the European Community and Brazil.

  • April, 2004

    STASI German/Russian Lexicon of Intelligence Terms Introduction

    This compact German-Russian dictionary came to light in 1967. The dictionary is anonymous: it has no indication of title, authorship, publisher, place and date of publication - there are no indications at all. On reading through it, it is clear that it contains Cheka terminology, and was compiled after 1954. When translated into Russian, these terms were to assist operational officers working in the USSR KGB Establishment attached to the GDR MfS [Ministerium für Staatssicherheit] - helping them to read secret German-language materials supplied in great quantities by the GDR MfS [2], sent on to the Centre with a cover note, and to carry on conversations on Chekist themes with their German colleagues.