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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • January 14, 1976

    US Department of State Cable, ROK Reprocessing Plant

    A heavily redacted report on the U.S.-Canadian consensus that South Korea should not be able to obtain a nuclear weapons capability.

  • January 27, 1976

    George Vest to the Secretary, 'Nuclear Suppliers Status Report'

    In this document regarding the final agreement, George Vest wrote Kissinger that it “served to close many of the loopholes and inadequacies of previous nuclear cooperation agreements between suppliers and recipients.” It also put the French and West Germans on record to restrict access to sensitive nuclear technologies. Nevertheless, as Vest noted, the guidelines would not prevent “indigenous” development of nuclear capabilities and “unsafeguarded developments” or the acquisition of sensitive technology.

  • June 11, 1976

    George Vest to the Secretary of State, 'London Nuclear Suppliers Meeting'

    This document provides an overview of the London Nuclear Suppliers' Meeting which included the addition of the five newest countries to the original seven. Most old and new members were receptive when Washington lobbied them to support a “long term and stable regime of restraint” on the export of sensitive enrichment and reprocessing technology. While the French were supportive of the moratorium proposal, the Germans were uncomfortable with it, not least because of the implications for their deal with Brazil.

  • June 23, 1976

    Conversation between Prime Minister of South Africa Balthazar Vorster and US Secretary of State Henry Kissinger

    Meeting of a US delegation headed by Henry Kissinger with South African officials including Prime Minister Vorster on the topic of the situation in Rhodesia, Smith's rule there, the military situation in that country, and the potential involvement of Cuba or China in the conflict.

  • September 28, 1976

    Telegram to the President from the Minister of Foreign Affairs, 'Report on the Meeting between the Foreign Minister of the ROK and the US Secretary of State and Foreign Ministers of the ROK and Japan'

    A report on the conversation between Minister of Foreign Affairs Pak Tong-Jin and US Secretary of State Henry Kissinger. The relationship between South Korea, North Korea, and the United States are discussed and linked with specific issues such as the Axe Murder Incident and conversations between US and North Korea.

  • September 29, 1976

    Discussion between SWAPO with Dr Henry Kissinger, US Secretary of State, in New York

    Dr. Kissinger expresses his proposal for a conference on Namibia to be attended by SWAPO (South West Africa People's Organization), Turnhalle members, and South Africa. The Conference concerned the ongoing struggle for independence by Namibian guerrillas from South African rule. Kissinger pledged US support to SWAPO as the leading force in Namibia, but Namibian delegates responded that they would not attend the conference unless South Africa met all preconditions including the withdrawal of troops from Namibian territory.

  • October 08, 1976

    Background Papers, Kissinger Proposals at Geneva Conference

    An examination of the consequences of Kissinger's proposal at the Geneva Conference. An overview of South Africa's predicament when it comes to Rhodesia.

  • December 07, 1976

    Report for South African Prime Minister Balthazar Vorster from ADR, Prime Minister's Return to Geneva

    Description of the situation at the Geneva Conference, the lack of Kissinger's presence due to Ford's electoral defeat, and the South African realization that the chance for a peace settlement at Geneva is almost gone.

  • March 01, 1984

    Telegram by the Ambassador to the United States Petrignani to Ministry of Foreign Affairs, 'Prospects of resuming the FNI negotiations'

    Ambassador Petrignani reports his conversation with Vice Secretary of State Burt following Kissinger's interview in Time where he talks about NATO's crisis and need for burden sharing reform. Burt distances the current administration from Kissinger's views, stating instead that euro-american relations are "in good health", and there is no need for drastic measures.

  • January 17, 1989

    Record of Conversation between M. S. Gorbachev and H. Kissinger

    Gorbachev and Kissinger discuss opening up a secret line of communication between Soviet Union and the US, facilitated by Kissinger and Brent Scowcroft, and coordinating a visit between President Bush and Gorbachev in the near future.