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Digital Archive International History Declassified

SEARCH RESULTS FOR “zedong”

  • December 29, 1949

    Telegram to Mao Zedong from Nie Rongzhen concerning the Repatriation of Ethnic Korean Soldiers to North Korea

    Lin Biao and others ask for instructions on whether to send ethnic Korean officers and soldiers to North Korea.

  • January 01, 1950

    Memorandum, Conversation of Mao and USSR Ambassador to China N.V. Roshchin on 1 January 1950

    Mao Zedong informs Roshchin that India and Burma had expressed interest in establishing diplomatic relations with China, and that the UK may follow suit. The Chinese position, Mao said, is to agree to negotiations if these governments renounced their ties with the Guomindang. Mao and Roshchin also discussed the military situation and the question of Japanese POWs. Mao did not the POWs right away because the Chinese legal system was not developed enough. He also informed Roshchin of his intention to curtain stay in the USSR.

  • January 02, 1950

    Cable, Mao Zedong to the Central Committee of the CCP

    Mao Zedong informs the Central Committee of "an important breakthrough" in his talks with Stalin, and asks that Zhou Enlai immediately come to Moscow to conclude a new Sino-Soviet treaty.

  • January 03, 1950

    Telegram, Mao Zedong to CCP CC, 4 a.m., 3 January 1950

  • January 05, 1950

    Telegram, Mao Zedong to CCP Central Committee

    Mao Zedong urges the Central Committee to ensure the secrecy of the Sino-Soviet negotiations for a new treaty.

  • January 06, 1950

    Conversation between A. Vyshinsky and Mao Zedong, Moscow

    In this conversation Mao and Vyshinskii talk about Sino-Soviet economic cooperation, including Soviet aid in rebuilding the Jilin power plant and provision of fuel supplies. The conversation the turns on the question of Japanese POWs. Mao wants to leave them in the USSR for a while longer, and Vyshinskii agrees. Finally, Mao tells Vyshinskii that he is of the opinion that the USSR and China must sign a new treaty of alliance, to which Vyshinskii (possibly unaware of the TASS interview) replies that he sees difficulties in this.

  • January 07, 1950

    Telegram, Mao Zedong to Zhou Enlai and CCP CC

    Mao Zedong reviews New China's foreign trade and foreign economic relations.

  • January 07, 1950

    Telegram, Mao Zedong to Liu Shaoqi and Zhou Enlai

    Mao Zedong issues a letter on Chinese representation at the United Nations.

  • January 07, 1950

    Telegram, Mao Zedong to Zhou Enlai and CCP CC

    Mao Zedong updates Zhou Enlai on the Sino-Soviet negotiations and Sino-Soviet cooperation at the United Nations.

  • January 10, 1950

    Telegram, Mao Zedong to CCP CC and CCP Northwest Bureau, 10 January 1950 (Excerpt)

  • January 13, 1950

    Telegram, Mao Zedong to Liu Shaoqi

    Mao Zedong cables to Liu Shaoqi regarding the status of US property and institutions in China, the situation in Hong Kong, and Chinese representation at the United Nations.

  • January 13, 1950

    Cable, Mao Zedong to Liu Shaoqi

    Mao Zedong gives instructions on Sino-Soviet military cooperation and makes personnel appointments to the Chinese armed forces.

  • January 14, 1950

    Telegram, Mao Zedong to Hu Qiaomu

    Mao Zedong gives instructions to Hu Qiaomu on how to write about recent developments within the Japanese Communist Party.

  • January 17, 1950

    Conversation, V.M. Molotov and A.Y Vyshinsky with Mao Zedong, Moscow, 17 January 1950

    In this conversation Molotov reads out to Mao the part of Acheson's Jan. 12 statement about the Soviet take-over of Manchuria, Mongolia and Xinjiang. Molotov proposes that the Chinese Foreign Ministry issues a refutation. Mao suggests that Xinhua should do that, but Molotov disagrees, and Mao promises that the Foreign Ministry will issue a statement. Mao, for his part, mentions several US probes to establish relations with Communist China, but notes that his policy is to keep the Americans at arms' length, and, in fact, to force them to leave China altogether. Towards the end Molotov and Mao discuss China's representation at the UN (Molotov asks that China appoint a representative, something that Mao appears reluctant to do), and China's representation at the Allied Control Council for Japan.

  • January 17, 1950

    Telegram, Mao Zedong to Liu Shaoqi

    Mao Zedong announces that the People's Republic of China will recognize Ho Chi Minh's government in northern Vietnam.

  • January 18, 1950

    Telegram, Mao Zedong to Liu Shaoqi

    Mao Zedong gives Liu Shaoqi guidance on Chinese foreign policy towards the United States and Great Britain.

  • January 18, 1950

    Telegram, Mao Zedong to Liu Shaoqi

    Mao Zedong informs Liu Shaoqi that Zhang Wentian, not Zhang Hanfu, ought to be appointed as the PRC Ambassador to the United Nations.

  • January 19, 1950

    Telegram, Mao Zedong to Liu Shaoqi and Hu Qiaomu

    Mao Zedong writes to Liu Shaoqi and Hu Qiaomu with comments on a newspaper article.

  • January 19, 1950

    Telegram Shtykov to Vyshinsky on a Luncheon at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the DPRK

    Shtykov reports a meeting with Kim Il Sung, along with Chinese and Korean delegates. Kim Il Sung expresses his view on the prospect of a liberation of the South Korean people that is to follow the Chinese success in liberation. Kim expresses his view that the South Koreans support his cause for reunification which the South Korean government does not seem to purse, and that he desires to ask Stalin for permission on an offensive action on South Korea.

  • January 22, 1950

    Record of Talks between I.V. Stalin and Chairman of the Central People's Government of the People’s Republic of China Mao Zedong

    Conversation between Stalin and Mao concerning a proposed treaty of friendship and alliance between the USSR and China. Discussion includes: the prospects of future Japanese aggression, the Chinese-Eastern Railway (Mao and Stalin disagree on who should run its administration), the Port Arthur agreements (including the question of the port of Dalny), and economic cooperation. The economic cooperation focuses on a Soviet credit program for economic development in China, as well as the question of arms shipments to China. There is also discussion of Tibet.