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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • August 29, 1987

    Department of State Telegram 270161 to Embassy Ottawa, 'Access to Canadian Documents in Pervez Case'

    The Canadian government cooperated with the US Justice Department in the Pervez case by seizing documents at his and making them available to federal prosecutors. The State Department wanted permission to review the documents “on the premises of the U.S. law enforcement authorities.”

  • September 02, 1987

    Consulate Lahore Telegram 0524 to Embassy Islamabad, Information Department of State, 'Pervez Nuclear Arrest Case—Possible Location of Brig. Inam Ul Haq'

    A confidential source told consular officials that the Pakistani government had detained Inam Ul Haq and was “being rotated between various locations” in Pakistan-controlled Kashmir.

  • September 04, 1987

    Ted Borek to Mr. Peck et al, 'Draft Note to Canadians on Pervez Documents'

    The Canadian government cooperated with the US Justice Department in the Pervez case by seizing documents at his and making them available to federal prosecutors. The State Department wanted permission to review the documents “on the premises of the U.S. law enforcement authorities.”

  • September 05, 1987

    State Department Telegram 278631 to US Embassy Ottawa, 'Access to Canadian Documents In Pervez Case'

    The Canadian government cooperated with the US Justice Department in the Pervez case by seizing documents at his and making them available to federal prosecutors. The State Department wanted permission to review the documents “on the premises of the U.S. law enforcement authorities.”

  • November, 1987

    United States v. Arshad Pervez, Criminal Number 87-00283, Exhibit List

    The exhibits included Pervez’s notebooks with such incriminating language as “atom” and “military.”

  • November, 1987

    United States v. Arshad Pervez, Criminal Number 87-00283, Exhibits 38-38 through 38-85

    The exhibits included Pervez’s notebooks with such incriminating language as “atom” and “military.”

  • November, 1987

    United States v. Arshad Pervez, Criminal Number 87-00283, Exhibits 38-86 through 52

    The exhibits included Pervez’s notebooks with such incriminating language as “atom” and “military.”

  • November, 1987

    United States v. Arshad Pervez, Criminal Number 87-00283, Exhibits 24 through 38-37

    The exhibits included Pervez’s notebooks with such incriminating language as “atom” and “military.” Moreover, “my expert is procurement manager for nuclear plant.” A letter from Ul-Haq to Pervez from early 1987 demonstrated that this was more than a business venture: “personal interests must not be allowed to overtake national interests.”

  • November 04, 1987

    Arms Control and Disarmament Agency, Memorandum from Kenneth Adelman to Under Secretary of State for Political Affairs, 'A Strategy on Pakistan'

    Adelman advised Armacost to “increase pressure on Pakistan to try to get them to stop enrichment above five percent and to stop illegal procurement activities in the United States.”

  • November 21, 1987

    Arms Control and Disarmament Agency, Memorandum from Kenneth Adelman for the President, 'Certification on Pakistan'

    Secretary Shultz had recommended that Washington “now certify” that Pakistan “does not possess a nuclear device” (as required by the Pressler amendment).

  • December 14, 1987

    Department of State, Memorandum from Jonathan Schwartz to Ms. Verville [et al.], 'Pervez Trial Status'

    After hearing tape-recorded conversations and seeing Pervez’s diary entries and the Pervez-Carpenter correspondence, on 17 December 1987, the jury found him guilty on 5 out of 8 counts, including conspiracy, attempted export of beryllium without the required license, and submitting false end-use statements about the maraging steel. Inam Ul-Haq was also found guilty of conspiracy and false statements.

  • December 17, 1987

    Letter, President Reagan to Speaker of the House, Enclosing Presidential Determination

    Reagan informed Congress that he had “concluded that Pakistan does not possess a nuclear explosive device.”

  • December 17, 1987

    Department of State Telegram to US Embassy Islamabad, 'Pervez Case Verdict'

    After hearing tape-recorded conversations and seeing Pervez’s diary entries and the Pervez-Carpenter correspondence, on 17 December 1987, the jury found him guilty on 5 out of 8 counts, including conspiracy, attempted export of beryllium without the required license, and submitting false end-use statements about the maraging steel. Inam Ul-Haq was also found guilty of conspiracy and false statements.

  • December 21, 1987

    Arms Control and Disarmament Agency, Memorandum from Norman Wulf for Under Secretary of State for Political Affairs, 'Next Steps on Pakistan—Solarz and Symington'

    Norman Wulf sent Armacost a proposal for applying nonproliferation standards to Palistan even if Reagan rejected application of the Solarz amendment and aid continued.

  • December 23, 1987

    Department of State, Memorandum from Jonathan Schwartz to Ms. Verville [et al.], 'Pervez Trial Status'

    After hearing tape-recorded conversations and seeing Pervez’s diary entries and the Pervez-Carpenter correspondence, on 17 December 1987, the jury found him guilty on 5 out of 8 counts, including conspiracy, attempted export of beryllium without the required license, and submitting false end-use statements about the maraging steel. Inam Ul-Haq was also found guilty of conspiracy and false statements.

  • December 29, 1987

    Department of State, Memorandum from INR Director Morton Abramowitz to Mr. Armacost, 'Pakistan—Pervez Case and Solarz Amendment'

    This INR memorandum tacitly assumed that the facts of the Pervez case fit a decision to invoke the Solarz amendment: despite some recent actions to “restrict nuclear procurement in the US,” the procurement network “could not exist without the umbrella of government approval, protection, and funding.”

  • January 05, 1988

    Presidential Determination No. 88-5 of January 15, 1988

    Recognizing the facts brought out by the Pervez conviction, in January 1988 the Reagan White House invoked and then waived the Solarz amendment.

  • January 05, 1988

    White House Statement on Continuation of Military Aid to Pakistan

    Recognizing the facts brought out by the Pervez conviction, in January 1988 the Reagan White House invoked and then waived the Solarz amendment.

  • February 09, 1988

    Report, Embassy of Hungary in India to the Hungarian Foreign Ministry

    Report on India's response to the signing of the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces (INF) Treaty by the United States and Soviet Union. India supportive of disarmament efforts, in part because of its concerns about China and Pakistan. Describes a speech made by Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi at the Six Nation Five Continent Peace Initiative summit in January at Stockholm.

  • July 21, 1988

    Ciphered Telegram No. 181, Embassy of Hungary in India to the Hungarian Foreign Ministry

    Short report on a visit to Moscow by Indian President Venkataraman. He asked for more military support from the Soviet Union to counterbalance Pakistan's nuclear weapons program. There were disagreements about the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty.