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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • October 25, 1962

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy in Cuba, 'A Cuban Leader Talked about Domestic Mobilization'

    A report on the meeting between Huang Wenyou and Joaquin Ordoqui. They discuss two main issues: the fact that the oil supply and general economic conditions in Cuba are tough, but the Cuban people still remain positive; and the American mobilization for invasion and war against Cuba, especially given the fact that Kennedy recently took a hard line against Cuba in a meeting with Gromyko (a Soviet official).

  • October 25, 1962

    Telegram from Soviet delegate to the United Nations V. A. Zorin to USSR Foreign Ministry

    Preparation for an upcoming meeting with acting UN Secretary U Thant, a meeting with the Soviet Union that will take place between U Thant’s meetings with the US and Cuba. Zorin says they will transmit Khrushchev’s message during the meeting that the Soviet agrees with U Thant’s proposal of holding a negotiation for a peaceful settlement in the Caribbean region. He also says the Soviet should expect the US would not agree to the suspension of “quarantine” activity only after the removal of “offensive weaponry” from Cuba. Soviet, however, would insist the negotiation to be based on U Thant’s proposal of suspending arms stockpiling in Cuba, which is supported by neutral countries.

  • October 25, 1962

    Telegram from Soviet delegate to the United Nations V. A. Zorin to USSR Foreign Ministry on UN Security Council Meeting of 24 October 1962

    Zorin transmits the events of the 24 October meeting relaying the speeches of British, French, Romanian, Chilean, Ghanaian, etc delegates. Zorin argues that delegates from Venezuela and Chile supported the American draft resolution under the US pressure. The United Arab Republic and Ghana stressed the US actions against Cuba violated the principle of maritime freedom and posed a threat to security. UN Acting Secretary-General U Thant proposed the interested parties meet and discuss the situation within several weeks. Zorin also relays that a number of neutral Afro-Asian countries are working on a new draft resolution.

  • October 25, 1962

    Minutes of the Meeting of the Hungarian Revolutionary Worker’s and Peasant’s Government (Council of Ministers)

    The document includes Hungarian Council of Ministers meeting minutes from 25 October 1962. The minutes are dominated by János Kádár’s detailed overview of events leading up to the current international situation. The overview is preceded by the Council of Ministers approving the government’s public statement on the Cuban Missille Crisis. During the session Kádár summarizes US provocation, Cuban and Soviet responses, and the military mobilization of different countries and military alliances, and Hungary’s political campaign in support of Cuba. Kádár notes negotiations between Cuba, the US, and Soviet Union initiate the day before. The minutes also include exchanges between Kádár and other Council of Ministers representatives.

  • October 26, 1962

    Telegram from the Brazilian Embassy in Havana (Bastian Pinto), 6 p.m., Friday

    A telegram from the Brazilian Embassy in Havana,Cuba describing the paralyzed activities in Cuba due to the incalculable damage to the economy of the country because of the American blockade.

  • October 26, 1962

    Telegram from the Brazilian Embassy in Havana (Bastian Pinto), 6 p.m., Friday

    A report on a meeting between the ambassador of Yugoslavia [Boško Vidaković] with President [Osvaldo] Dorticós to discuss American planes making low-level flights over Cuba and, according to information received recently (at the time), the American attack being imminent.

  • October 26, 1962

    Telegram from Swiss Foreign Ministry to Swiss Embassy in Havana (Stadelhofer)

    A telegram from the Swiss Foreign Ministry to the Swiss Embassy in Havana summarizing a written message from the Cuban Ambassador, Jose Ruiz Velasco, concerning the U.S. blockade of Cuba.

  • October 26, 1962

    Telegram from Polish Embassy in Washington (Drozniak), 26 October 1962

    According to Drozniak, US Secretary of State Dean Rusk has allegedly reported that the latest statements of journalists claiming the relaxation of tensions in the Cuban Missile Crisis do not correspond to the reality of serious tensions between the US and USSR.

  • October 26, 1962

    Telegram from Soviet delegate to the UN Zorin to USSR Foreign Ministry (3) on the meeting between Garcia-Inchaustegui and U Thant on October 26, 1962

    The meeting between the Cuban delegate to the UN Garcia-Inchaustegui and U Thant.

  • October 26, 1962

    Telegram from Fidel Castro to N. S. Khrushchev

    In his message to Khrushchev, Fidel Castro evaluated the two possible scenarios of American aggression against Cuba. Castro seems to suggest a retaliatory nuclear strike against the US in the case of an attack on Cuba.

  • October 26, 1962

    Telegram from Yugoslav Embassy in Rio de Jeneiro (Barišić) to Yugoslav Foreign Ministry

    Yugoslav Foreign Minister Koča Popović talks with Brazilian Foreign Ministry official Carlos A. Bernardes about the situation of the Cuban Missile Crisis. They are afraid that euphoria could make the US intensify a conflict that could lead to invasion, because the US ambassador [Lincoln Gordon] claims constantly that the solution to this crisis is not only disarmament of Cuba, but also liquidation of Fidel’s regime.

  • October 26, 1962

    Telegram from East German Ambassador, Moscow, to East German Secretary of State (First Deputy Foreign Minister) Otto Winzer

    The East German Ambassador in Moscow, Rudolf Dölling, writes to the East German Secretary of State (First Deputy Foreign Minister), Otto Winzer, about several diplomatic meetings that have been held concerning US-Cuban relations and tensions. One of these meetings is between several Eastern European countries: East Germany, Poland, Bulgaria, USSR, Romania and Czechoslovakia.

  • October 26, 1962

    Telegram from the Brazilian Embassy in Washington (Campos), Noon, Friday

    Campos offers an analytical review of the latest events in the Cuban Crisis, which has led him to some conclusions, including the goals of the United States government (to block new offensive arms from arriving in Cuba and to obtain the dismantling or removal of the present warlike installations).

  • October 27, 1962

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy in Ghana, 'Report on Conversation with the Third Secretary of Cuban Embassy'

    Chinese embassy in Ghana discusses the situation in Cuba. Ghana proposes African-Asian delegation to inspect Cuban military establishments; also says the U.S. will attack Cuba at 9:30 pm on the evening of 27 or 28 October 1962, but does not identify the source of this information.

  • October 27, 1962

    Telegram from Swiss Foreign Ministry to Swiss Embassy in Havana (Stadelhofer)

    The Swiss Foreign Ministry in Berne and the Swiss Embassy, Havana (Stadelhofer) discuss Cuba's actions in regards to negotiations in the Organization of American States (OAS). He says, "In this superpower confrontation, Cuba has more and more lost its right of self-determination."

  • October 27, 1962

    Telegram from Yugoslav Embassy in Havana (Vidaković) to Yugoslav Foreign Ministry

    Ambassador Vidaković describes a meeting with Cuban President Osvaldo Dorticos. Dorticos is convinced that the American attack and invasion will happen later that night.

  • October 27, 1962

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy, Havana, 'Report on Conversation with Cuban Official Joaquín Ordoqui'

    Chinese embassy in Cuba discusses with a Cuban official the likelihood of a U.S. invasion and war. They also discuss the mobilization preparations and Castro's position on fighting a war with the United States.

  • October 27, 1962

    Telegram from Yugoslav Embassy in Rio de Janeiro (Barišić) to Yugoslav Foreign Ministry

    A telegram from the Yugoslav Embassy in Rio de Janeiro to the Yugoslav Foreign Ministry about a meeting with Brazilian President João Goulart. Barišić says Goulart considers that everything must be done to prevent the beginning of war, because war would bring unpredictable catastrophe and it would be hard to extinguish it if war operations start. Goulart also shares his opinion that negotiations are necessary, and that Cuba must be prevented from becoming an atomic base for it could be the constant cause of war dangers.

  • October 27, 1962

    Telegram from Yugoslav Embassy in Havana (Vidaković) to Yugoslav Foreign Ministry

    Vidaković describes the positions of both Cuban President Osvaldo Dorticos, with whom he met, and U Thant, who sent him a message. Both men relay the difficulties in dealing with the Cuban situation, especially concerning the resolution to the UN on inspections in Cuba and the imminent danger of a possible American attack.

  • October 27, 1962

    Soviet Intelligence Report on Meeting with Scali and American Proposal

    Report on the exchanges between the KGB Station Chief in Washington and ABC News correspondent John Scali. They discuss possible Soviet actions in West Berlin in the case of an American invasion of Cuba and an American offer not to invade Cuba if Fidel Castro publicly pledges to dismantle the long-range missiles. Washington would agree to let Cuba keep the defensive-type missiles and might make a secret pledge to withdraw the American troops in the South.