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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • November 12, 1973

    Memorandum of Conversation between Mao Zedong and Henry Kissinger

    Secretary of State Henry Kissinger met with Chairman Mao and Zhou Enlai. The three discussed a large range of topics from Sino-Soviet relations to the Middle East to the influence of Chinese communism.

  • November 26, 1973

    Rajya Sabha Q&A on Nuclear Missile Delivery System Developement

    Transcript of Questions and answers between members of the Rajya Sabha and the Minister of Defence Shri Jagjivan Ram on China's development of rockets capable of delivering nuclear weapons.

  • March, 1974

    East German Report on Seventh Interkit Meeting in Budapest, March 1974

    This report, issued after the seventh Interkit meeting in Budapest, addresses unsolved socio-economic problems and internal party disputes in China. The new military strategy of the People's Republic as well as its economic development are examined. Beijing's foreign relations with Western countries, especially with the US, are considered to be detrimental to international détente. The attendees condemn China for stockpiling nuclear weapons and missiles in preparation for a military confrontation with the Soviet Union, for extending its influence in developing countries, for strengthening the position of NATO, for interfering with the domestic policies of Vietnam, and for supporting the military junta in Chile.

  • May 25, 1975

    Rajya Sabha Q&A on Chinese Nuclear Tests

    Transcript of questions and answers between members of the Rajya Sabha and the Prime Minister and Minister of Atomic Affairs on the evidence, frequency, and course of action regarding Chinese nuclear missile tests.

  • June, 1975

    East German Report on the Eight Interkit Meeting in Ulaanbaatar, June 1975

    This report, issued after the eighth Interkit meeting in Ulaanbaatar, addresses the domestic and foreign policies of China and the anti-Maoist propaganda measures to be undertaken by Socialist countries. There are no great expectations for a collapse of Maoism, even though the Chinese economy is developing slowly. China is acquiring nuclear weapons and missiles in preparation for an armed conflict. Beijing's foreign relations with Western countries are considered to be detrimental to international détente and directed against the interests of the Soviet Union and the Socialist countries.

  • September 17, 1975

    Telegram from L.L Mehrotra, Charge d’Affaires in Beijing

    Report from New Zealand's Ambassador to China on a conversation between New Zealand’s Press Delegation and Vice Premier Teng Hsia-ping. They discussed China's policies on opposing nuclear proliferation.

  • April 30, 1976

    Meeting between Mr. Muldoon and Mao Zedong at Chairman Mao's Residence, 30 April 1976

    An ailing Mao Zedong and Robert Muldoon discuss China's recent nuclear tests and agree that the Soviet Union is a common threat for both China and New Zealand. Both Mao himself and the note-takers from New Zealand make frequent mention to the Chairman's deteriorating health.

  • July 12, 1977

    Letter, Mostafa K. Tolba to Rafeeuddin Ahmed

    Mostafa K. Tolba reports on China's nuclear policies in anticipation of an upcoming visit by the Secretary-General to China.

  • December 07, 1979

    Deputy Director for National Foreign Assessment, Central Intelligence Agency, Enclosing Report, 'A Review of the Evidence of Chinese Involvement in Pakistan’s Nuclear Weapons Program'

    With nuclear proliferation a policy priority for the Jimmy Carter administration, and Pakistan already a special concern, the possibility that China and Pakistan were sharing nuclear weapons-related information began was beginning to worry US government officials. They had no hard evidence--and the soft evidence that concerned them is massively excised in the December 1979 report just as Beijing and Washington were normalizing relations—so the “precise nature and extent of this cooperation is uncertain.”

  • June, 1981

    Secretary's Talking Points: US-China Relations

    This is a document containing talking points for Secretary of State Alexander Haig's meeting with Deng Xiaoping. Topics addressed in the document include: Chinese exportation of uranium and heavy water to South Africa and Argentina; the intention to suspend the prohibition of arm sales to China; greater nuclear and security cooperation; the increase in Chinese arm sales to countries dependent on the Soviet Union; and the desire to open a new consulate in Shenyang.

  • January 20, 1983

    Special National Intelligence Estimate, SNIE 13/32-83, 'Chinese Policy and Practices Regarding Sensitive Nuclear Transfers'

    With nuclear proliferation a policy priority for the Jimmy Carter administration, and Pakistan already a special concern, the possibility that China and Pakistan were sharing nuclear weapons-related information began was beginning to worry US government officials. These concerns did not go away during the Reagan administration. While nuclear proliferation was not a top priority, the administration was apprehensive about the implications of the spread of nuclear capabilities and that China may have been aiding and abetting some potential proliferators by selling unsafeguarded nuclear materials.

  • September, 1985

    Memorandum, US National Intelligence Council, NIC M 85-10001, 'The Dynamics of Nuclear Proliferation: Balance of Incentives and Constraints'

    The most recent CREST release included this analysis of “The Dynamics of Nuclear Proliferation: Balance of Incentives and Constraints.” The analyst sought to explain why “no additional overt proliferation of nuclear weapons has actually occurred” since the Chinese nuclear test, India had not weaponized while Israel and South Africa had not “taken any action to signal overt possession of nuclear weapons.”

  • October 23, 1985

    Ciphered Telegram No. 306, Embassy of Hungary in India to the Hungarian Foreign Ministry

    Short report on arguments being made in India to gain support from the Soviet Union for the Indian nuclear program. India would like to gain international prestige similar to China.

  • March 03, 1986

    Ministry for State Security of the GDR, Main Department I, 'Topical Report on the Status of Reorganization and Modernization of the Chinese Armed Forces'

    A detailed report on the status of China's armed forces, including the PRC's nuclear weapons strategy.

  • June 08, 1987

    Stenographic Transcript of the Official talks between Erich Honecker and Zhao Ziyang

    Zhao Ziyang and Honecker discuss economic and political reforms in China, bilateral relations between China and East Germany, attempts to reduce nuclear and chemical weapons stockpiles, and China's attitudes toward the Iran-Iraq War, Japan, the United States, and the Soviet Union.

  • February 09, 1988

    Report, Embassy of Hungary in India to the Hungarian Foreign Ministry

    Report on India's response to the signing of the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces (INF) Treaty by the United States and Soviet Union. India supportive of disarmament efforts, in part because of its concerns about China and Pakistan. Describes a speech made by Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi at the Six Nation Five Continent Peace Initiative summit in January at Stockholm.

  • October 18, 1988

    Note about a Meeting between Erich Honecker and Qiao Shi

    Erich Honecker and Qiao Shi discuss economic and political reform in China, attempts to foster Sino-Soviet rapprochement, and East German and Chinese attitudes toward chemical and nuclear weapons.