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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • December 07, 1962

    Message from Mexican Foreign Ministry to Mexican Embassy, Rio de Janeiro

    A message from the Mexican Foreign Ministry to its Embassy stressing that is aware of the Brazilian government’s various proposals to intervene in the resolution of the Cuban-North American problem.

  • December 14, 1962

    Mongolian Embassy in Moscow, Record of Conversation between the Mongolian Ambassador to the Soviet Union and Cuba’s Minister of Foreign Trade Alberto Mora Becerra

    Mongolian Ambassador in Moscow Luvsan and the visiting Cuban Minister of Foreign Trade Alberto Mora make plans for future trade negotiations between Mongolia and Cuba. They also discuss the aftermath of the Cuban Missile Crisis and the effect of the US embargo on Cuba's trade relations with Latin American countries and the sale of its sugar harvest.

  • December 15, 1962

    Resolution of the Brazilian Communist Party

    Message reporting on a resolution passed by the Brazilian Communist Party which praised the Soviet Union for it's role in the Cuban Missile Crisis and criticized the Brazilian government for it's involvement in the US-lead Alliance for Progress.

  • December 21, 1962

    Cable from US Desk, Israeli Foreign Ministry, to Israeli Embassy, Washington

    A description of President Kennedy's visit to Brazil on 17 December and his explanation of the implicaitons of the Cuban Missile Crisis on Brazilian foriegn policy.

  • March 06, 1963

    Record of Conversation from Chairman Mao's Reception of the Delegation of the Brazilian Communist Party (The New Party)

    Chairman Mao addresses the communist compulsion to revolution and past cases of revolutionary activities like the Cuban experience.

  • March 09, 1963

    Letter to Walter Ulbricht on the Brazilian Communist Party

    An official in the GDR Foreign Policy and International Relations department reports on a meeting with General Secretary of the Communist Party of Brazil, Comrade Luis Carlos Prestes, in Havana.

  • May 17, 1963

    Memorandum of Conversation from Chairman Mao's Reception of the Delegation of the Brazilian Communist Party (The Old Party)

    Chairman Mao discusses Manuel Jover Telles's visit to China, the Brazilian economy, and factions within the Brazilian government.

  • April 18, 1963

    Meeting of Mao Zedong and Brazilian Communist Party (PCB) Delegation

    Chairman Mao and Telles discuss prospects for revolution, the 1927 revolution, and U.S. imperialism, among other shared concerns.

  • May 02, 1963

    Message, P.L. Bhandari, Embassy of India, Mexico City, 'A Nuclear-Free Zone for Latin America'

    Mexico proposed that all Latin American countries ban the installations of nuclear bases on their soil.

  • October 28, 1963

    Letter from Johann Lorenz Schmidt to Walter Ulbricht on Brazil

    Johann Lorenz Schmidt reports on meetings with General Secretary of the Brazilian Communist Party, Luis Carlos Prestes, during which they discussed the strong Chinese influence in Cuba.

  • 1964

    Material for the Visit of Prestes with Ulbricht on 14 February 1964

    A dossier of materials on the Brazilian Communist Party prepared in anticipation of a visit by Luis Carlos Prestes. It gives an overview of East German relations with the Brazilian Communist Party as well as current domestic politics in Brazil.

  • March 04, 1964

    S. A. Levin, L.R. Powers, and E. Von Halle, Union Carbide Corporation Nuclear Division, 'Nth Power Evaluation'

    Union Carbide Nuclear Company updates their previous study on the ease with which other nations could secretly create nuclear weapon facilities using the gas centrifuge.

  • March 28, 1964

    Airgram from the Embassy of the US in Rio De Janeiro to the Department of State, 'Non-Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy by Brazil'

    The US Embassy in Rio De Janeiro sends airgram to the Department of State regarding military pressure in Brazil to produce fissionable material for nonpeaceful purposes.

  • March 03, 1965

    Bulgarian Embassy, Havana (Kulbov), Information Regarding The Latin American Communist Parties’ Conference

    First Secretary of the Bulgarian Embassy to Cuba A. Hubenov describes a Latin American communist party conference held in Havana, November 1964. The parties secretly discussed their struggle against imperialism and the expansion of communist revolutions in Latin America and Cuba's assistance to that struggle. Conference deliberations included a discussion of the Sino-Soviet split and the fear of factions within the communist movement.

  • March 26, 1965

    Minutes of Todor Zhivkov – Raul Castro Meeting in Sofia

    Zhivkov lays out his perspective on the place of Bulgaria within the Communist Camp. He also talks about the Balkans and the rift between Bulgaria and Romania. Both leaders discuss the Chinese accusations of Soviet Revisionism. Raul Castro talks about the strength of the communist movements in Latin America and the prospects for successful social revolutions in Venezuela, Chile, Costa Rica, Uruguay, and Brazil.

  • May 13, 1966

    Telegram from Charge d'Affaires of Mexico City on the Third Session of the Preparatory Commission for the Denuclearization of Latin America

    This report focuses on Mexico and Brazil’s differeing approaches towards the issue of denuclearization of Latin America

  • June 22, 1966

    Note on the Third Session of the Preparatory Commission for the Denuclearization of Latin America held in Mexico City from April 19 to May 4, 1966

    As a result of the commission, a draft treaty has been prepared for the creation of a Nuclear Weapon Free Zone. Brazil and Mexico have rival approaches to denuclearization.

  • August 31, 1966

    Telegram from the Indian Embassy in Mexico City

    The Latin American Denuclearization Commission has been post-poned.

  • March 17, 1967

    Research Memorandum RAR-8 from George C. Denney, Jr., to the Secretary, 'The Latin American Nuclear Free Zone: Pluses and Minuses'

    The treaty creating the Latin American Nuclear Free Zone (LANFZ) was signed at Tlatelolco, Mexico, on 14 February 1967. Taking a close look at key provisions, INR found that the entry into force provisions included loopholes which “unenthusiastic” states could use so the treaty did not cover their territory.

  • May 11, 1967

    Telegram from the Indian Embassy of Brazil, 'Statement Made on 9th May 1967 by the Minister of Foreign Relations of Brazil'

    On May 9, Brazil signed the Treaty of Tlatelolco to ban nuclear weapons in Latin America.