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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • October 27, 1962

    Telegram from Yugoslav Embassy in Havana (Vidaković) to Yugoslav Foreign Ministry

    Ambassador Vidaković describes a meeting with Cuban President Osvaldo Dorticos. Dorticos is convinced that the American attack and invasion will happen later that night.

  • October 27, 1962

    Telegram from Polish Embassy in Havana (Jeleń), 27 October 1962

    Jelen discusses the Cuban Missile Crisis: military and missile bases in Cuba and Turkey, UN inspections of Cuba and U-2 planes.

  • October 27, 1962

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy, Havana, 'Report on Conversation with Cuban Official Joaquín Ordoqui'

    Chinese embassy in Cuba discusses with a Cuban official the likelihood of a U.S. invasion and war. They also discuss the mobilization preparations and Castro's position on fighting a war with the United States.

  • October 27, 1962

    Telegram from Yugoslav Embassy in Rio de Janeiro (Barišić) to Yugoslav Foreign Ministry

    A telegram from the Yugoslav Embassy in Rio de Janeiro to the Yugoslav Foreign Ministry about a meeting with Brazilian President João Goulart. Barišić says Goulart considers that everything must be done to prevent the beginning of war, because war would bring unpredictable catastrophe and it would be hard to extinguish it if war operations start. Goulart also shares his opinion that negotiations are necessary, and that Cuba must be prevented from becoming an atomic base for it could be the constant cause of war dangers.

  • October 27, 1962

    Air Letter from Mexican Embassy, Rio de Janeiro

    A letter from the Mexican Embassy in Brazil in which he comments on the position taken by the Brazilian Delegate in the Council of the Organization of American States (OAS) to vote in favor of necessary measures to impede the traffic of offensive weapons, but to vote not in favor of a condemnation of the Cuban regime.

  • October 27, 1962

    Telegram from Polish Embassy in Washington (Drozniak), 27 October 1962

    Drozniak reports on his conversation with American journalist and syndicated columnist Joseph Alsop about the Cuban Missile Crisis.

  • October 27, 1962

    Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union Presidium Protocol 62

    Protocol 62 illustrates how it was Khrushchev who raised the stakes during the missile crisis and dictated a new letter to Kennedy indicating he would only remove the missiles from Cuba in exchange of the United States withdrawing its military bases from Turkey and Pakistan. The Pakistan demand would later be dropped, however and the US would only agree to remove its IRBMs from Turkey.

  • October 27, 1962

    Robert F. Kennedy, Memorandum for Dean Rusk on Meeting with Anatoly F. Dobrynin

    Robert Kennedy relays the results of a meeting with Dobrynin regarding the shooting down of an American plane over Cuba and the presence of long-range missiles there.

  • October 27, 1962

    Soviet Intelligence Report on Meeting with Scali and American Proposal

    Report on the exchanges between the KGB Station Chief in Washington and ABC News correspondent John Scali. They discuss possible Soviet actions in West Berlin in the case of an American invasion of Cuba and an American offer not to invade Cuba if Fidel Castro publicly pledges to dismantle the long-range missiles. Washington would agree to let Cuba keep the defensive-type missiles and might make a secret pledge to withdraw the American troops in the South.

  • October 27, 1962

    Report to CPCz General Secretary Antonin Novotný

    The report to Novotny details the happenings of the Cuban Missile Crisis at that time. Great Britain feels out of the loop and hurt by not being consulted by the United States before it took action, while Kennedy is not backing down on the blockade until the missiles are removed. According to the message, it is unclear whether there are nuclear missiles in Cuba at all; an American army colonel admits to the UN that no traces have been found, despite hundreds of photographs taken. In Czechoslovakia, the situation is unchanged; troops are still on alert and awaiting combat orders, with morale running high. There are even some volunteers willing to go to Cuba and aid their Latin comrades.

  • October 27, 1962

    Cable, Ambassador Dobrynin to the Soviet Foreign Ministry, Meeting with Robert Kennedy

  • October 27, 1962

    Cable from Federal Republic of Germany Embassy, Washington (Knappstein)

    A cable from the West German Embassy in Washington, D.C. discussing the threat to American security posed by an "offensive" Soviet base in Cuba, insights provided by recent intelligence, the purpose and the impact of the American blockade of Cuba, negotiations that have taken place at the United Nations, Soviet intentions during the Cuban crisis and, finally, a comparison of Cuba to the situation in Berlin.

  • October 28, 1962

    Telegram from the Brazilian Embassy in Havana (Bastian Pinto), 6:45 p.m., Sunday

    Pinto describes a meeting with Roa in which Roa repeats a message from Fidel Castro's proclamation that the evacuation of the American base Guantanamo should be directed at not only the United States, but also the Soviet Union, to show both that Cuba is not a toy of the great powers and should be heard in the coming negotiations.

  • October 28, 1962

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy in Cuba, 'The Chilean Economic Advisor Jaime Barrios Discussed the Cuban Situation'

    A conversation with the Chilean economic advisor. They discuss: American plane shot down over Cuba, possible invasion of Cuba and the mass mobilization needed to support Cuba.

  • October 28, 1962

    Telegram from Polish Embassy in Havana (Jeleń), 28 October 1962

    Jelen discusses the various diplomatic communication channels that are taking place during the Cuban Missile Crisis through speeches, letters, phone conversations, etc., mostly between the leaders of the US, the USSR and Cuba.

  • October 28, 1962

    Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union Presidium Protocol 63

    According to Protocol 63, Khrushchev probably assumed that Kennedy’s patience was at an end and the Cuban Missile Crisis might either be resolved or spin out of control, and the Kremlin again considered how it might respond to a US attack. If anyone suggested a preemptive strike, or even a retaliatory strike, against a target outside of the Caribbean, Malin did not note it for the official record.

  • October 28, 1962

    Telegram from Brazilian Embassy in Washington (Campos), 2 p.m., Sunday

    Campos discusses agreements that are being made between Kennedy and Khrushchev regarding the immediate dismantling of the missile bases in Cuba, international inspections of Cuba, and an abandonment of the demand for reciprocity in Turkey.

  • October 28, 1962

    Telegram from the Brazilian Embassy in Washington (Campos), 2 p.m., Sunday

    Campos discusses the brief alleviation in tensions between the United States and Soviet Union over the Cuban issue due to a temporary accord for a limited-diversion of the Soviet ships.

  • October 28, 1962

    Memorandum of Conversation, Federal Republic of Germany Chancellor Konrad Adenauer and US Ambassador Walter Dowling, Rhöndorf, West Germany

    In preparation for an upcoming NATO Council meeting, the US and West German representatives discuss the current situation in Cuba - the developments of Soviet missile bases thus far, the United Nations negotiations in process, talks (letters) between Kennedy and Khrushchev, American surveillance planes coming under fire, and Soviet ships approaching the blockade line. Giving these circumstances, they feel the United States will perhaps feel compelled to resort to military action shortly.

  • October 29, 1962

    Telegram from Mexican Embassy, Washington (Flores)

    A telegram from the Mexican Embassy in Washington, DC describing the US's stance on the situation in Cuba and the opinions of President Kennedy.