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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • November 01, 1978

    TELEGRAM 1/010020 from the Romanian Ministry of Foreign Affairs to the Romanian Embassy in Pyongyang

    The Romanian Ministry of Foreign Affairs reports on recent changes in trilateral relations between North Korea, the Soviet Union, and China.

  • March 12, 1981

    Report, Embassy of Hungary in North Korea to the Hungarian Foreign Ministry

    The Soviet Union continues talks with the DPRK regarding economic issues. The Soviet Union extends North Korea's credit, yet continues to defer the construction of the repeatedly requested power plant. Sino-Korean relations are also criticized.

  • July 28, 1983

    Memorandum, Branch Office of the Hungarian Ministry of Foreign Trade in Pyongyang to the Hungarian Ministry of Foreign Trade

    At the Soviet-Korean Intergovernmental Economic, Technical, and Scientific Consultative Commission, the Soviets decline to extend technological cooperation with the Koreans until the DPRK is part of relevant international agreements.

  • May 30, 1984

    Stenographic Record of Conversation between Erich Honecker and Kim Il Sung

    Stenographic record of the first meeting between Kim Il Sung and Erich Honecker upon the former's 1984 official visit to the GDR. This is the morning session of 30 May 1984. Kim does most of the talking. Kim Il Sung discussed the economic situation in North Korea, objectives and problems of energy generation, the educational system. He asked the GDR for labor and cooperation in the education of specialists. He wanted to sign a long-term agreement of economic cooperation along with the intended friendship treaty. Kim Il Sung also evaluated the military situation in South Korea, explaining the problems of negotiations and reunification with the South. Honecker proposed the creation of an agreement towards economic and scientific cooperation between GDR and North Korea.

  • March 09, 1985

    Report, Embassy of Hungary in North Korea to the Hungarian Foreign Ministry

    The Soviet Union and DPRK enter negotiations to build a nuclear power plant, and "practically reach a preliminary agreement." North Korea views the construction as being a means of increasing economic and political prestige.

  • May 30, 1988

    Report, Embassy of Hungary in North Korea to the Hungarian Foreign Ministry

    Negotiations continue at the Soviet-Korean Intergovernmental Economic, Technical, and Scientific Commission on the construction of a nuclear power plant in North Korea. No agreement is reached on selecting a construction site.