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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • July 16, 1969

    Record of a Conversation [with] H. Humphrey in the Izvestiya Newspaper's Editorial Offices

    L.N. Tolkunov and Hubert Humphrey discuss Soviet-American and Sino-Soviet relations, as well as domestic politics in the United States.

  • December 16, 1969

    Letter, Y. Andropov to the CPSU CC

    Andropov reports that Chinese diplomats stationed in the USSR are actively trying to discredit the Soviet Union, particularly in regard to the border dispute.

  • April 05, 1971

    Memorandum for President Nixon from Kissinger, "The Berlin Negotiations - New Guidelines"

    National Security Advisor Henry Kissinger updates President Nixon on the status of the Four Power Berlin negotiations between the Soviet Union, East Germany, West Germany, and the United States.

  • April 19, 1971

    Memorandum from Andropov to Ustinov, Regarding US Positions in the Anti-Ballistic Missile Negotiations

    KGB chief Andropov analyzes the Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty negotiations, particularly the US negotiating positions and the preferences of various Washington agencies.

  • July 21, 1971

    Memorandum for President Nixon from Kissinger, "Berlin Negotiations: The Unresolved Issues"

    National Security Advisor Henry Kissinger updates President Nixon on the status of the Four Power Berlin negotiations between the Soviet Union, East Germany, West Germany, and the United States, focusing on unresolved issues on which the four states were unable to agree.

  • August 13, 1971

    Cable from Ambassador Rush to Kissinger Regarding Four Powers Negotiations on Berlin

    US Ambassador Rush informs Kissinger on the progress of negotiations between the Soviet Union, France, Great Britain, and the United States on the status of Berlin. He reports that negotiations have gone well, aside from difficulties with the British and French ambassadors.

  • August 15, 1971

    Cable from Ambassador Rush to Kissinger Regarding Four Powers Negotiations on Berlin

    US Ambassador Rush informs Kissinger on the progress of negotiations between the Soviet Union, France, Great Britain, and the United States on the status of Berlin.

  • August 18, 1971

    Cable from Ambassador Rush to Henry Kissinger on the Four Powers Negotiations on Berlin

    US Ambassador Rush recommends to National Security Advisor Henry Kissinger that the negotiations take a "no more than a two week recess" in agreement with the request made by Secretary of State Rogers.

  • August 19, 1971

    Cable from Ambassador Rush to Henry Kissinger Regarding the Four Powers Negotiations on Berlin

    Rush updates National Security Advisor Henry Kissinger on the progress of the Four Powers Negotiations on Berlin, informing him that the "bureaucrats [in the State Department] have been foiled" and an agreement has been completed and "it contains virtually everything we hoped to get under our maximum demands."

  • March 22, 1972

    Memorandum of Conversation between Richard Nixon and Zhou Enlai

  • July 06, 1972

    From the Journal of N.G. Sudarikov, 'Record Of A Conversation with Kim Il Sung, General Secretary of the KWP CC and Chairman of the DPRK Cabinet of Ministers, 19 June 1972'

    Kim Il Sung expresses satisfaction toward Brezhnev’s positions regarding Korea and Vietnam which were made during talks with U.S. President Nixon. Kim also criticizes Park Chung Hee for suppressing the opposition in South Korea, including the imprisonment of Kim Dae-jung.

  • September 22, 1972

    Minutes of Conversation between Nicolae Ceaușescu and the Economic Delegation from the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea

    Nicolae Ceausescu meets with the head of the Korean delegation to Romania, Jeong Jun-taek, regarding the DPRK's efforts for peaceful reunification of the Korean peninsula. They discuss at length the political situation of South Korea, the US and Japan's role, and end with negotiations on economic aid for the DPRK.

  • October 18, 1972

    About Some Current Questions Concerning the Multilateral Preparations for the European Security Conference

    An update on the progress of the pre-CSCE agenda negotiations

  • December 15, 1972

    Secret Telegram from Moscow to Warsaw, No. 13698

    This gives a short overview of Chinese foreign policy in light of Communist and Soviet attitudes and perceptions in China. A possible Soviet response to such attitudes is suggested.

  • June 27, 1973

    Telegram by Ambassador Pignatti to Ministry of Foreign Affairs, 'US-USSR Agreement on the prevention of nuclear war'

    The document describes initial reactions to the signing of the Agreement on the Prevention of Nuclear War in Washington. The new agreement raises concerns over the bipolar focus of US-USSR relations, NATO's traditional strategy, and poses questions related to autonomous European defense.

  • June 27, 1973

    Telegram by Ambassador in Brussels Pignatti to Ministry of Foreign Affairs, 'Soviet-American agreement on preventing nuclear war'

    Summarizes the first comments from Min. Foreign Affairs on the agreement Soviet-American for the Prevention of Nuclear War. It is said that the philosophy of this agreement appears to have contradictions with regard to the classic strategy of NATO and diminish the credibility of the latter. Conceptions NATO military will have to be updated in light of recent agreements and ongoing trends around the Russian-American bipolarity. Just because you are at a "secondary" compared to the two supergrandi, Europeans should take the opportunity arising from this new trend to seriously address the issue of their defense. The prospect more desirable at this stage is an acceleration of proesso European unification, including the appearance of its "independent" defense.

  • October 11, 1973

    Meeting of Prime Minister Trudeau and Premier Zhou Enlai at the State Guest House (Diaoyutai)

    Zhou Enlai offers Canadian Prime Minister Trudeau an extensive history of the Chinese Civil War and Chinese Revolution. Zhou also comments on China's foreign policy positions toward and views on the Soviet Union, nuclear war, Bangladesh, revisionism, and great power hegemony, among other topics.

  • October 29, 1973

    Personal Letter from the Head of the KGB, Yurii Andropov, to the General Secetary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union, Leonid Ilyich Brezhnev

    Andropov gives his views on American and Soviet strategy vis-a-vis the 1973 Yom Kippur War.

  • November 04, 1973

    Prime Minister's Discussions with Premier Zhou Enlai, 31 October-3 November 1973, Summary

    Zhou Enlai and E.G. Whitlam discuss Sino-Australian relations, the Overseas Chinese in Southeast Asia, the Indo-Pak conflict, Great Power relations, Taiwan's international status, and other issues.

  • January 28, 1975

    Note On a Conversation with USSR Embassy Counselor Comrade Pimenov on 24 January 1975 in the Soviet Embassy

    A note summarizing a conversation on the coverage of the People's Congress in China by "Rodong Sinmun" and a planned trip of Kim Il Sung to the Soviet Union.