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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • May 08, 1953

    USSR Foreign Ministry Draft Memorandum, 'On Further Soviet Government Measures Pertaining to the German Question'

    Memorandum from the Soviet Foreign Affairs Ministry on Soviet foreign policy options with regard to the German Question. The memorandum looks at the effects on Soviet policy toward the western powers in the context of the Postdam conference and at the future state of the Soviet-East German relations.

  • May 18, 1953

    CIA Criticizes American Committee for Liberation Policies

    Dana Durand, chief of the CIA/DDP SR Division, now responsible for the Radio Liberty project, concludes that efforts to unify the Russian emigration have become counterproductive, that RL broadcasting should be separated from émigré politics, and that AMCOMLIB president Leslie Stevens is too wedded to the old approach to continue in office.

  • May 23, 1953

    Letter by United Nations Commander Mark W. Clark to the Joint Chiefs of Staff on Solving the Prisoner of War Issue

    General Clark relays to the US Joint Chiefs of Staff the terms of the United Nations proposal to repatriate prisoners of war captured during the conflict in Korea. The agreement grants prisoners the right to refuse to be repatriated.

  • June 03, 1953

    Record of Molotov's Conversation with US Ambassador Bohlen

    A follow-up conversation after the one on the 28th of May. The two discuss the talks that were taking place in Panmunjom, and Bohlen mentions the American men with Soviet wives currently residing in the Soviet Union. Molotov is unaware of this situation.

  • June 06, 1953

    Statement by President Syngman Rhee

    President Syngman Rhee strongly opposed the peace talks between the United Nations, the North Korea People’s Army, and the Chinese People’s Volunteer Army. Rhee proposed that he would accept this armistice only if the United States signed a Mutual Defense Pact and to continue to build the ROK forces after the war.

  • June 18, 1953

    Report from A. Grechko and Tarasov to N.A. Bulganin, 2:30 p.m.

    The authors state that Berlin was calm, but there were a few demonstrations in some smaller GDR cities. The authors referred to military intelligence information according to which the US 7th Army and the 12th Air Force Army were put on alert in the US zone at 5.30 a.m. on June 18. But the alert state for the 7th Army was canceled after three hours.

  • July 01, 1953

    Memorandum of Informal Psychological Strategy Board Meeting

    The United States Psychological Strategy Board discusses implementation of previously-discussed plan, NSC 158, as well as other proposals for responding to the East German riots.

  • July 04, 1953

    CPSU Central Committee Decision

    About the draft response to Clark's letter from the 29th of June.The decision instructs Malenkov and Molotov to answer the Chinese comrades, and inform them of the Soviet Union's agreement their assessment and the measures proposed on the issue of peace talks in Korea, in connection with the Clark's letter.

  • July 04, 1953

    Telegram from USSR Foreign Minister V.M. Molotov to Soviet Ambassador in Beijing

    Molotov writes to the Soviet Ambassador in Beijing discussing the Korean War armistice.

  • July 07, 1953

    National Security Council Report, NSC 157/1, 'US Objective with Respect to Korea Following an Armistice'

    NSC 157/1 analyzes the situation following the armistice in Korea and the problem of Korea's division in half. The report analyzes the North Korea/Communist, US, and South Korean positions regarding reunification. Although a unified Korea allied militarily with the US is not seen as a possibility, the report concludes that it might still be possible to achieve "a unified, neutralized Korea under a substantially unchanged ROK [South Korea]."

  • July 08, 1953

    Memorandum of Informal Psychological Strategy Board Meeting

    The logistics behind a food relief distribution plan for East Germany are discussed.

  • July 24, 1953

    Radio Liberty Broadcasting Reviewed

    State Department, CIA, and American Committee for Liberation (AMCOMLIB) representatives review Radio Liberty issues. CIA notes RL’s “steady progress” without participation of the émigré Political Center.

  • July 27, 1953

    President Eisenhower to the President of the Republic of Korea (Rhee)

    Eisenhower informs Rhee that US Secretary of State John Foster Dulles will be visiting Korea shortly.

  • July 27, 1953

    The President of the Republic of Korea (Rhee) to President Eisenhower

    Rhee thanks Eisenhower for US appropriations for South Korea and congratulates him on the Korean War armistice.

  • July 31, 1953

    Resolution of the CPSU Central Committee (Draft)

    Draft resolution before the CPSU CC, seeking approval for actions required to strengthen the Soviet position in Germany and increasing the counteraction of the aggressive plans of the Anglo-American bloc in Europe.

  • August 03, 1953

    Confidential Memorandum, Before Agreeing to the Armistice Agreement

    When the United States agreed to a truce talk to end the Korea War, President Syngman Rhee disapproved. He opposed the truce and tried to attack these peace proceedings through a serious of events- such as releasing thousands of prisoners of war and creating turmoil for the US government. In order to persuade Rhee to accept the armistice defense, the US dispatches Assistant Secretary of State Walter Robertson to meet with the South Korean president in a series of bargaining discussions. Eventually, under certain conditions and a mutual defense pact with the US, Rhee agrees to the armistice.

  • August 05, 1953

    Summary Record of the Conference held between President Rhee and Secretary Dulles (First Session)

    In early August of 1950, delegates from the United States and the Republic of Korea met to discuss the logistics for the forthcoming conferences centered on the creation of a strong US-ROK mutual defense treaty. The delegates also propose who can and should be present. While both sides agree that North Korea and China should be included, President Rhee advocates that due to India’s Prime Minister’s “pro-communist views,” India should not be invited.

  • August 06, 1953

    Summary Memorandum, US-ROK Mutual Defense Treaty (August 6)

    In 1953, Secretary Dulles met President Rhee to discuss the US-ROK mutual defense treaty. This summary memorandum notes twelve of Rhee’s requests and/or points he will like this treaty to incorporate. These include the number of ROKA divisions, which economic model the US should use to help Korea’s economy, and the request for moral and material support for the ROK to resume war with the north. This summary also notes whether the US granted, wanted to further discuss, or rejected each point.

  • August 06, 1953

    Proposed Joint Statement by President Rhee and Secretary Dulles

    In this proposed joint statement, President Rhee and Secretary Dulles discuss the terms for the joint security pact between the ROK and the US.

  • August 07, 1953

    Summary Record of the Conference held between President Rhee and Secretary Dulles (Third Session)

    President Rhee and Secretary Dulles have concluded the final negotiations for the US-ROK defense pact and now both believe it is time to inform the American and Korean public. Rhee emphasizes that he will not accept Korean neutralization and it is imperative to remove the Chinese from the north. Dulles states that the US will do its best to unify Korea under one peaceful government and will try to remove the Chinese aggressors in the north.