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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • October 22, 1964

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy in India, 'India's Reactions to Khrushchev's Removal and China's Nuclear Test'

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy in India describing mixed responses of Indians on Khrushchev's removal and China's nuclear test.

  • October 23, 1964

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy in Cuba, 'Reactions to China's Nuclear Test and to Khrushchev's Removal'

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy in Cuba describing positive responses of Cuban officials and foreign government officials and public in Cuba regarding China's nuclear test.

  • October 23, 1964

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy in Indonesia, 'Subandrio Met with Ambassador Yao for a Discussion on Nuclear Test'

    Description of a conversation between Chinese Ambassador Yao Zhongming and Indonesian Foreign Minister Subandrio. Subandrio expresses support for China's recent nuclear test, declaring that it will "contribute to world peace." Subandrio suggests a proposal that the upcoming Conference on Disarmament in Geneva invite China, along with a number of other Afro-Asian countries, which Yao responds negatively to, because this conference is convened by the United Nations.

  • October 24, 1964

    Transcript of Conversation between Zhou Enlai and Philippine's Journalists' Delegation

    Premier Zhou and Philippine journalists' discuss obstacles to establishing friendly Sino-Philippine relations. One obstacle is that Philippines is part of the U.S. led alliance camp in Asia. Zhou believes that despite China and Philippine being part of two different camps, this should not prevent China and the Philippines from establishing bilateral relations. The second obstacle is that thee Philippines still maintains diplomatic relations with Taiwan. Zhou also says that Philippines-Taiwan relations should not prevent the Philippines from establishing relations with the mainland. Reporters ask for Zhou's perspective on U.S. military deployment in Philippines and Filipino people's fear that China might use friendly Sino-Philippines relations to incite communist revolution in their country.

  • October 27, 1964

    Cable from the Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'Ambassador Yao, Please Set an Appointment with Subandrio'

    Cable from the Chinese Foreign Ministry responding to a previous cable sent by Ambassador Yao Zhongming, describing a discussion with Subandrio about a recent Chinese nuclear test. The Foreign Ministry suggests that Subandrio, by suggesting a that the Conference on Disarmament in Geneva should invite China, is collaborating with "imperialists and the revisionists in their conspiracy to oppose the nuclear test in China." The Ministry asks to set up an appointment with Subandrio to clearly express China's disagreement with his suggestion, including in the cable specific answers to the previous suggestions Subandrio made to Yao.

  • October 29, 1964

    Conversation from [Mao Zedong's] Audience with a Women's Delegation from South West Africa

    Mao invites the delegation of women from South West Africa (now Namibia) to teach Chinese children and youth about the oppression that they have faced under imperialism and capitalism.

  • October 29, 1964

    Conversation Record of Premier Zhou Enlai’s Meeting with the Five Ambassadors and Charge d'affaires of Vietnam, Romania, Albania, Cuba, and Korea

    Zhou Enlai evaluates Nikita Khrushchev's dismissal as Secretary of Communist Party of the Soviet Union.

  • October 30, 1964

    Reply from Acting President, Dr. Subandrio, to Premier Zhou Enlai

    Subandrio writes a letter to Premier Zhou Enlai, praising the idea proposed in a previous message from China about holding a summit conference on general disarmament and banning of nuclear weapons. Subandrio suggests that the conference could have a higher chance of success if the 5 nuclear states (US, USSR, UK, France, and China) met prior to the summit.

  • October 31, 1964

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy in India, 'India's Reactions to China's Nuclear Test'

    The Chinese Embassy in India reviews various responses to China's nuclear test among Indian leaders.

  • November 03, 1964

    Record of Zhou Enlai’s Discussion with British Minister President of the Board of Trade Douglas Jay

    Having successfully executed a nuclear test explosion, Zhou Enlai describes the Chinese government’s motivation for pursuing atomic weapons capabilities. Zhou argues that the Three-Nation Treaty (Limited Test Ban Treaty) is insufficient, that the United States remains committed to nuclear proliferation despite the agreement, and that China seeks to end the monopoly that other nuclear powers have thus far exploited. Zhou also calls for the organization of a global, truly equal summit at which to discuss the issue of nuclear weapons testing and proliferation.

  • November 07, 1964

    Record of Conversation between Polish leader Wladyslaw Gomułka and Chinese Premier Zhou Enlai, Moscow

    Zhou Enlai and Gomulka discuss the growing split between China and the Soviet Union.

  • November 09, 1964

    Record of Conversation between Polish leader Wladyslaw Gomułka and Chinese Premier Zhou Enlai, Moscow

    Zhou Enlai and Gomulka discuss the Sino-Soviet split following Khrushchev's removal as well as Poland's involvement in maintaining peace in Vietnam.

  • November 20, 1964

    Philosophy and Social Science Department Research Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 'Materials on the Korean Treatment of Goryeo-Mongolian Relations in the 13th and 14th Centuries'

    The Philosophy and Social Science Department Research Center of the Chinese Academy of Sciences summarizes the treatment of Goryeo-Mongolian Relations in the 13th and 14th centuries by North Korean Historians. They also note North Korean criticisms of China's The History of Yuan and the USSR's World History for discrepancies in historical interpretation.

  • November 24, 1964

    Rajya Sabha Debate on Nuclear Prohibition

    Debate among members of the Rajya Sabha on attendance to a Chinese hosted Summit Conference on Nuclear Weapons.

  • December 24, 1964

    K.R. Narayanan, 'India and the Chinese Bomb'

    K.R. Narayanan, Director of China Division at Ministry of External Affairs, writes that the explosion of the first nuclear bomb by China will alter the political balance of Asia and the world and development of nuclear weapons by India can be justified and beneficial for the country and the international system as well.

  • December 02, 1964

    Stasi Report on Meetings with the KGB, 30 November-1 December 1964

    Meetings between KGB Chairman Semichastny and East German Minister for State Security Mielke. Topics of discussion include Lyndon B. Johnson's recent election in the United States, Khrushchev's ouster from the Kremlin, Sino-Soviet relation, and Khrushchev's son-in-law Alexei Adzhubei.

  • December 03, 1964

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy in Czechoslovakia to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, 'Our Contacts with Middle- and Lower-Level Personnel'

    The Chinese Embassy in Czechoslovakia reports that "people were willing to talk with us and listen to our opinions" since Khrushchev's fall from power.

  • December 08, 1964

    Cable from the Head Office of the All China Handicraft Cooperative

    The Malian Art Institute requests Chinese experts in jewelry making and wood and ivory carving

  • December 10, 1964

    Note No. 131/64 on a Conversation between the Soviet Embassy Counselor, Comrade Privalov, and Comrade Bibow on 11 November 1964 in the GDR Embassy from 10:30 a.m. - 12:45 p.m. [Excerpts]

    Conversation at the East German Embassy between Embassy Counselor Privalov and Comrade Bibow, centering on the Vietnamese delegation to Moscow in November 1964. They discuss how Soviet policy remains unchanged since the 22nd Congress, and how the Chinese try to oppose the successors of Krushchev.

  • December 12, 1964

    Cable from the Foreign Cultural Liaison Committee, ‘Regarding the Issue of Sending Experts in Woodcarving and Ivory to Mali’

    The Foreign Cultural Liaison Committee decides that Chinese experts in Mali must be both politically reliable and technically skilled.