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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • June, 2007

    The Operational Situation as Reported in 1971, 1975, and 1981. Folder 35. The Chekist Anthology.

    In folder 35 Mitrokhin discusses the KGB’s assertion of an increase in domestic dissent and unrest in the 1970s and early 1980s as well as the methods the KGB utilized to combat this threat. Soviet intelligence believed that this increase in domestic unrest was due primarily to an increased effort by the United States and its allies to promote internal instability within the USSR. In response, the KGB continued to screen foreigners, increased the harshness of penalties for distribution of anti-Soviet literature, and monitored the activities and temperament of nationalists, immigrants, church officials, and authors of unsigned literature within the Soviet Union. Mitrokhin’s note recounts the KGB’s assertion that foreign intelligence agencies were expanding their attempts to create domestic unrest within the USSR. These activities included the support and creation of dissidents within the Soviet Union, the facilitation of the theft Soviet property such as aircrafts, and the public espousal of a position against Soviet persecution of dissidents and Jews. Responding to public exposure of these activities, the KGB proclaimed its legality and trustworthiness while also beginning to assign some agents verbal assignments without written record.

  • June, 2007

    Coordination of Soviet and Czechoslovak Intelligence Operations. Folder 80. The Chekist Anthology.

    This folder consists of a detailed operational plan for cooperation between the Czechoslovakian Ministry of Internal Affairs and the KGB for the years 1975-1978. Specific objectives include penetrating the military, political, and economic establishments of the United States, Britain, West Germany, France, and NATO, impeding the activities of the Czech Congress of National Development (KNR), collecting information on “Zionist intrigues,” gathering scientific/technical information on Western achievements in the fields of biological, chemical, and thermonuclear weapons, and using active measures to curtail the activities of Radio Free Europe and Radio Liberty in West Germany.

  • June, 2007

    Solzhenitsyn, Codenamed Pauk [Spider]. Folder 40. The Chekist Anthology.

    This folder contains information about KGB active measures directed at author Alexander Solzhenitsyn following his exile from the Soviet Union in 1974. The operational directives prepared by the KGB’s leadership for 1974 and 1975 are reproduced verbatim. They included plans to limit Solzhenitsyn’s influence in the West, discredit him and the pro-democracy literary journal “Continent” with which he was closely associated, and make his family fear for their personal safety. Many of the specific measures undertaken by the KGB are described in the document. These included televised interviews with men featured in “The Gulag Archipelago” in which they claimed that Solzhenitsyn fabricated or misrepresented their statements to him, the publication of personal letters between Solzhenitsyn and his close male friends which were intended to reveal the “intimacy of their relations,” and the publication of an article claiming that Solzhenitsyn failed to pay his taxes while he resided in Switzerland. The 1978 operation codenamed “Vampire 1” involved planting a news story which suggested that Solzhenitsyn was a KGB spy, and having it reprinted in prominent newspapers and journals throughout Europe and the US. The document concludes with an index of acronyms, people, and codenames mentioned in the folder.

  • June, 2007

    Actions to Promote Discord. Folder 90. The Chekist Anthology.

    Contains information on active measures undertaken by the KGB residency in Ankara, Turkey during the late 1970’s and early 1980’s. The residency carried out active measures to destabilize Turkey’s military regime, undermine US military personnel’s sense of security through the publication of threatening leaflets, inflame the rivalry between Greece and Turkey, and foster anti-American sentiments. Mitrokhin provides detailed descriptions of several operations involving altered or fabricated personal correspondence, as well as newspaper articles written by, or ‘inspired’ by KGB agents or confidential contacts. The KGB residency claimed that these operations resulted in, among other things, the removal of Foreign Minister Nuri Birgi from office, and the expulsion of several American diplomats for allegedly interfering with Turkish elections.

  • June, 2007

    The Lucy Case. Folder 74. The Chekist Anthology.

    In this entry, Mitrokhin draws upon KGB files to describe Erlich Vranni “Lucy” (b. 1948), a native of Bern, Switzerland and the secretary of the Swiss Ambassador to Indonesia from 1969-1970. Beginning in January 1970, Lucy collaborated with Sergei Nikolayevich Argunov, an agent within the KGB’s branch in Jakarta, Indonesia.

  • June, 2007

    The Baptists. Folder 2. The Chekist Anthology

    This folder includes information on Cheka operations against the Evangelical Christian Baptist Church, (EHB) between 1917 and 1984.

  • June, 2007

    Non-conformism. Evolution of the 'democratic movement' as a politically harmful process since the mid-1950s. Folder 9. The Chekist Anthology.

    In this transcript, Mitrokhin points out that according to the Communist Party of the Soviet Union (CPSU) bourgeois ideology affected cohesion of the Soviet society in three major ways: 1) by creating opposition and manipulating people’s personal weaknesses in order to pull apart the Soviet organism; 2) by inflaming disputes between younger and older generations, members of intelligentsia and working class; 3) by building up everyday propagandist pressure.

  • 2009

    Vassiliev Odd Pages

    Original notes kept by Alexander Vassiliev while researching in the KGB archives. Vassiliev's loose "odd" pages which were not part of a notebook. Contains scans of the original pages, a Russian transcription, and an English translation.

  • 2009

    Vassiliev Yellow Notebook #2

    Original notes kept by Alexander Vassiliev while researching in the KGB archives. Contains scans of the original notebook, a Russian transcription, and an English translation.

  • 2009

    Vassiliev Yellow Notebook #1

    Original notes kept by Alexander Vassiliev while researching in the KGB archives. Contains scans of the original notebook, a Russian transcription, and an English translation.

  • 2009

    Vassiliev Yellow Notebook #3

    Original notes kept by Alexander Vassiliev while researching in the KGB archives. Contains scans of the original notebook, a Russian transcription, and an English translation.

  • 2009

    Vassiliev White Notebook #3

    Original notes kept by Alexander Vassiliev while researching in the KGB archives. Contains scans of the original notebook, a Russian transcription, and an English translation.

  • 2009

    Vassiliev Yellow Notebook #4

    Original notes kept by Alexander Vassiliev while researching in the KGB archives. Contains scans of the original notebook, a Russian transcription, and an English translation.

  • 2009

    Vassiliev White Notebook #2

    Original notes kept by Alexander Vassiliev while researching in the KGB archives. Contains scans of the original notebook, a Russian transcription, and an English translation.

  • 2009

    Vassiliev Black Notebook

    Original notes kept by Alexander Vassiliev while researching in the KGB archives. Contains scans of the original notebook, a Russian transcription, and an English translation.

  • 2009

    Vassiliev Notebooks Concordance

    A concordance to the Vassiliev Notebooks complied by John Earl Haynes listing cover names, real names, abbreviations, acronyms, organizational titles, and definitions of tradecraft terminology.

  • 2017

    Department of Energy, List of US Patents Related to the Manhattan Project

    Table listing patents developed by contractors working on the Manhattan Project.