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Documents

August 6, 1964

Report on the meeting between the Democratic Republic of Vietnam’s ambassador Nguyen Ngoc-Son with Qemal Rahmanaj

This document is a report on a meeting between the Democratic Republic of Vietnam's representative, Nguyen Ngoc-Son, with an Albanian official, Qemal Rahmanaj. Nguyen-Ngoc-Son reveals the American and South Vietnamese 1955 plan concerning marching into North Vietnam and establishing order in the South. In 1961 the plan is carried out in 3 phases. In phase 1, the Americans and the South Vietnamese government cooperated to create order in South Vietnam and establish American bases in North Vietnam. Phase 2 includes improving the military capability of the U.S. army and commencing sabotage operations in the North. Phase 3 includes developing the South Vietnamese economy and the beginning of military operations against North Vietnam. Alarmingly, the frequency of attacks against North Vietnam increases even further in 1964. Because of this, the ambassador asks for a press conference to inform Albanian media about the situation in Vietnam.

December 2, 1961

Telegram from Behar Shtylla to Ung Van Khiem

This document is a telegram from Albanian Foreign Affairs Minister Behar Shtylla to the Foreign Affairs Minister of North Vietnam, Ung Van Khiem. Shtylla shares the same indignation as the Vietnamese minister towards the dangerous situation arising in Vietnam. According to Shtylla, Kennedy is trying to transform South Vietnam into a base of operations for aggression directed against the Democratic Republic of Vietnam. Taking into account other actions towards Laos and Cambodia, he believes Kennedy is attempting to convert Indochina into an American base. Shtylla states that the American policy in Vietnam violates the general international conventions of conduct, as well as the Vietnamese people’s sovereignty. Shtylla expresses full solidarity with the Democratic Republic of Vietnam and supports its request that the chairmen of the Geneva Conference take measures against the American inference in South Vietnam.

August 29, 1961

Telegram from the Albanian Ambassador in Beijing Reiz Malile to the Albanian Prime Minister Mehmet Shehu

The Albanian Ambassador in Beijing Reiz Malile writes to the Prime Minister, Mehmet Shehu, and reports on his discussion with Marshal Chen Yi, the Chinese foreign minister, about a possible visit from the President of the Democratic Republic of Vietnam Ho Chi Minh to Tirana. Chen Yi suggests that Malile go to Vietnam for a national celebration and he promises a Chinese plane as transportation for his trip.

October 30, 1961

Telegram from the Foreign Affairs Minister of the Democratic Republic of Vietnam Ung Van Khiem to the Albanian Foreign Affairs Minister Behar Shtylla

This document is a telegram from the Foreign Affairs Minister of North Vietnam Ung Van Khiem to the Albanian Foreign Affairs Minister Behar Shtylla. Van Khiem describes to Shtylla the history of American-Vietnamese relations from the 1954 Geneva Convention until 1961. Van Khiem stresses that the situation in South Vietnam has worsened after President Kennedy took office. During May 1961, Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson came to Saigon and discussed with the President of the Republic of Vietnam Ngo Dinh Diem the prospect of enlarging American presence in South Vietnam. Since that time the South Vietnamese government, with American support, organized internment camps and a cordon sanitaire in the area of the South Vietnamese borders with Laos and Cambodia. Van Khiem sees these actions as menacing to peace in Indochina, and Southeast Asia more generally. The North Vietnamese government, abiding by the Geneva Convention on Indochina, proposed organizing a conference with the South Vietnamese authorities in order to discuss free elections throughout the country and the reunification of Vietnam. The government of the Democratic Republic of Vietnam denounced the American plans to enlarge the scope of aggressive actions in Vietnam and, especially, the plan to deploy the U.S. Army in South Vietnam.

August 7, 1964

Declaration of the Government of the People’s Republic of Albania Concerning the Aggressive Miilitary operations of the US against the Democratic Republic of Vietnam on August 7, 1964

This document is a declaration of the People’s Republic of Albania decrying the American military's actions on August 7 targeted against North Vietnam. According to the Albanian government, these operations endangered peace in Indochina and Southeast Asia in general in addition to violating the Geneva Convention of 1954. The American 7th Fleet and the American Air Force, along with South Vietnamese government forces, provoked a retaliatory action from North Vietnam. In addition, the Albanian government believes the Americans dispatched spies and saboteurs to North Vietnam. The Albanian government fully supports the sovereignty and independence of the North Vietnamese people in their struggle against the Americans. This declaration was distributed to all foreign diplomatic envoys in Albania.

November 25, 1964

A written message from the Albanian Prime Minster Mehmet Shehu to the participants of the conference on solidarity with the Democratic Republic of Vietnam in Hanoi on November 25, 1964

This document condemns the recent American involvement in South Vietnam. In addition, Shehu stresses the importance of showing support for the struggle of the people of South Vietnam and the Geneva Convention of 1954 which, he implies, the Americans violated.

June 6, 1964

Minutes of the meeting between the Democratic Republic of Vietnam’s delegate Tran Dinh Thu with an Albanian official Shpresa Fuga on June 6, 1964

This document is a report on a meeting between the Democratic Republic of Vietnam’s delegate, Tran Dinh Thu, with an Albanian official, Shpresa Fuga. Tran Dinh Thu reveals his appreciation for Albanian political support towards the cause of the South Vietnamese people against the United States. Tran Dinh Thu is also upset about the lack of actual financial support from the Soviet Union by comparing it to the more commendable support of the United States government for the government of South Vietnam. He asks for further Albanian support for the South Vietnamese people and asks that awareness of the Vietnam conflict be spread among the Albanian population.

June 26, 1964

Report on the 1st and 2nd Conference of Non-Aligned Countries

According to this report, the African and Asian countries were not satisfied with the 1st Belgrade conference and were trying to call what is known today as the 2nd non-aligned conference in Bandung. Tito and Nehru also reiterated the need for the 2nd conference of non-aligned countries in order to undermine the attempts of the former in initiating the effort. According to the Western press, Nehru took the initiative and sent his Vice-Foreign Minister, Dinish Sing, to Cairo and Belgrade where he met Nasser and Tito, both of whom were expecting him. Tito called for more participants from Africa, Asia, and Latin America. According to Tito’s recommendation, on March 23, 1964, in Colombo, Ceylon, the preparatory meeting was held on the ambassadorial level of Asian, African, and Latin American countries about the upcoming conference. The Soviet Union expressed its support for this conference in Soviet media. The report reveals the following to be discussed topics at the conference: peace, peaceful coexistence, resolution of disputes without the use of force, disarmament, etc. The Albanian government supports the conference of non-aligned countries in principle, but it does not show enthusiasm and avoids promoting the conference in Albania, in the media, and in the international arena. In addition, the report stresses that Albanian diplomats are ordered to follow the Ministry’s guidelines in order to maintain specific policies targeted at each Asian and African country individually.

July 26, 1961

Report on the 1st conference of the non-aligned countries of September 1st, 1961 sent by Tahmaz Beqari, the Albanian ambassador in Belgrade, to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Albania

The conference of non-aligned countries in Belgrade was organized when Indonesia and other countries of Asia and Africa were attempting to organize a Second Bandung Conference. Tito and Nehru, trying to minimize the influence of China in the Asian and African countries, initiated a conference that they called the Conference of Non-Aligned Countries in Belgrade. The document discusses the 24 participating countries, the agenda, the proceedings, the different groups among the delegation and the two main documents that the conference adopted: the manifesto and the declaration. The manifesto, titled “The Danger from the War and the Call for Peace,” according to the Albanian ambassador, was adopted in a revisionist spirit, calling on Khrushchev and Kennedy to maintain peace. Meanwhile, the declaration criticized colonialism and imperialism. The Belgrade conference did not decide on any specific issues and did not reach any important conclusions. In Albania, a week after the conference, the journal “Zeri i Popullit” (Voice of the People) wrote an article in which it identified Tito as an agent of imperialism and stated that Yugoslavia was not an non-aligned country as it participated in the Balkan Pact.

September 4, 1961

Telegram from the Albanian ambassador in Budapest, Edip Cuci, to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs

The Albanian ambassador reports that the Hungarian press published Khrushchev’s message to the Belgrade conference of non-aligned countries and excerpts of different speeches by participants of the conference. Hungarian television showed excerpts from the conference as well.

Pagination