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Documents

November 18, 1967

Asian Affairs Bureau [Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Japan], 'The Chinese Communist Problem'

Ahead of a visit by Chiang Ching-kuo to Japan, the Japanese Foreign Ministry reviews the political situation on Mainland China.

November 6, 1967

Petition on Opposition to the Coming to Japan of Taiwan’s National Defense Minister Chiang

Kawase Ikkan insists that the Japanese Government must cancel the upcoming visit by Chiang Ching-kuo for the sake of the country's relations with Mainland China.

November 1967

Statement of Nakajima Kenzo, Chairman of the Board, Opposing the Visit of Prime Minister Sato to the United States and Protesting the Coming to Japan of Chiang Ching-kuo

Nakajima Kenzo, a leading figure in the Japan China Cultural Exchange Association, denounces the impending visit of Chiang Ching-kuo to Japan.

November 21, 1967

Cable No. 705, Ambassador Shimazu (Taipei) to the Foreign Minister, 'Visit of Chiang Ching-kuo to Japan'

The Japanese Ambassador in Taipei warns that Chiang Ching-kuo's upcoming visit to Japan could trigger a "serious incident" with China if the visit is not well thought out in advance.

June 3, 1989

China Division, Asian Affairs Bureau [Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Japan], 'The Situation in China (Student Demonstrations)'

The document from the China Division, Asian Affairs Bureau of Japan’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs reveals Japanese Embassy personnel observations of the events that took place in Xinjuamen and Xidan on the afternoon of June 3, 1989 following the Tiananmen Square incident. It also references Premier Li Peng and Defense Minister Qin Jeiwei’s response following the events.

June 20, 1989

China Division, Asian Affairs Bureau [Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Japan], 'The Chinese Student Movement (After Armed Suppression by the Military)'

Report from the China Division, Asian Affairs Bureau of Japan’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs, on the subsequent actions of the United States, Britain, France, West Germany, and Canada.

June 4, 1989

China Division, Asian Affairs Bureau [Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Japan], 'Use of Force by Chinese Martial Law Forces (Questions and Answers)'

Report from the China Division, Asian Affairs Bureau of Japan’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs on June 4, 1989 detailing Japan’s response to the use of force by Chinese martial law forces following the Tiananmen Square incident.

June 4, 1989

China Division, Asian Affairs Bureau [Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Japan], 'The Chinese Student Demonstrations (Part 2)'

The document, written on June 4, 1989 and submitted by the China Division, Asian Affairs Bureau of Japan, lists the facts surrounding Beijing’s use of martial law authorities and military force during the Tiananmen Square incident on June 3, 1989. It details the background leading up to the imposition of the martial law, power struggles within the Chinese Communist Party, lateness in bringing the situation under control, and struggle for democratization and liberalization. It also indicates the impact of the Tiananmen Square incident and the CCP’s response as it pertains to the Party’s prestige and international image.

June 11, 1989

China Division, Asian Affairs Bureau [Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Japan], 'The Situation in China (Moves to Bring the Situation Under Control)'

Written on June 11, 1989, by Japan’s China Division, this document summarizes the activities of the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) after the Tiananmen Square incident. It evaluates the CCP’s apparent change in party leadership, problems in domestic affairs, problems in promoting reform and opening, and effect on external relations.

June 21, 1989

Document for the Vice Minister from the Aid Policy Division, Economic Cooperation Bureau

The document was written on June 21, 1989 by the Aid Policy Division, Economic Cooperation Bureau for the Vice Minister of Japan. The document focuses on how to respond to the Tiananmen Square incident and China’s means to which it modernizes and opens its economy. It urges the continuing of ongoing projects and eventual resumption of new economic projects in China once the situation stabilizes and dissuades from any substantial change in Japan’s economic policy towards China.

Pagination