Skip to content

Results:

1 - 10 of 322

Documents

October 31, 1997

The Chancellor's [Helmut Kohl's] Meeting with British PM Blair on 20 October 1997, 10.30 a.m. - 3 p.m. in Chequers

Kohl and Blair examine Britain's role in Europe. They discuss European Economic and Monetary Union, European aerospace industry, the agenda 2000 for Europe, EC enlargement and the convocation of the G-8 summit in Birmingham in 1998.

September 19, 1958

Address by Mr. Frank Aiken to the United Nations General Assembly Official, 23th Session, 751st Plenary Meeting

Aiken’s landmark address to the plenary of the UN General Assembly on 19 September 1958 launched his non-proliferation campaign. It is the first time he publicly identified stopping the spread of nuclear weapons as a concrete step in the collective interest to unblock the disarmament impasse, preventing as runaway arms race among the powers of the Earth. It was clearly framed as part of his wider campaign for global governance based on the rule of law rather than the threat of force. For Aiken, the challenge was stabilizing the arms race and generating trust to construct a world order based on justice and law – “to preserve a Pax Atomica while we build a Pax Mundi.” This speech was a critical departure. The widespread positive reception encouraged Aiken, persuading him to draft a formal resolution.

October 2, 1957

Memorandum by Frank Aiken [on an Interview with Scott McCleod and the Taoiseach]

Aiken made an immediate impression on his arrival in the Twelfth Session of the UN General Assembly in September 1957. He adopted an impartial posture of assessing each issue on its merits and campaigning to remodel international politics around self-determination, humanitarianism, and peace. His exhortation was that only the UN had the moral authority and political legitimacy to put forward global solutions. While he did not propose nuclear disarmament measures specifically, his intent was signaled by his recommendation for a mutual drawback of foreign forces (including their nuclear weapons) in central Europe and his endorsement of a proposal to discuss the representation of China in the United Nations. The Eisenhower administration was hostile to Aiken’s course as outlined in the U.S. ambassador’s audience with Taoiseach Eamon de Valera and Aiken in Dublin on 2 October. The record underlines the Irish concerns about accidental nuclear war due to the proximity of opposing U.S. and Soviet forces in central Europe.  

March 31, 1995

The Chancellor's [Helmut Kohl's] Meeting with Polish President Walesa in Copenhagen on 11 March 1995

Kohl and Walesa examine the state of NATO enlargement and EC enlargement. Walesa sees EC enlargment first and foremost as an economic process that would take longer. The decision for NATO enlargement could be taken faster, Walesa argues. Kohl reiterates the necessity of a "face-saving" solution for Russia short of giving Russia a veto over NATO enlargement.

June 14, 1994

State Minister Schmidbauer's Meeting with Iran's Foreign Minister Velayati on 13 June 1994 at the Chancellor’s Office

Schmidbauer and Velayati discuss the release of a German prisoner in Iran as a precondition for Germany's support of Iran's request for closer association with the European Community.

February 28, 1994

State Minister Schmidbauer's Meeting with Iran's Vice Foreign Minister Vaezi on 25 February 1994 at the Chancellor's Office

Schmidtbauer and Vaezi discuss the state of bilateral negotiatins on debt rescheduling as well as Iran's aspirations for closer contacts with the European Community. Vaezi asks for support during Germany's EC Presidency in the second half of 1995. Schmidbauer insists on the release of a German prisoner in Iran as a gesture of goodwill.

February 3, 1994

The Chancellor's [Helmut Kohl's] Lunch Meeting with President Clinton in Washington on 31 January 1994

Kohl and Clinton review the state of NATO enlargement after the January 1994 NATO Summit in Brussels. They view NATO's Partnership for Peace (PfP) as the best solution to engage Russia and to reach out to the countries of Central and Eastern Europe. Both view the situation in Ukraine as a key factor in the search for Europe's post-Cold War order. "If anything happened in Ukraine, this would increase the pressure for the NATO accession of the Central and Eastern European countries," Clinton says.

May 7, 1993

The Chancellor's [Helmut Kohl's] Meeting with U.S. Secretary of State Christopher on Thursday, 6 May 1993

Kohl and Christopher discuss various scenarios in the search for peace in former Yugoslavia after the failure of the Vance/Owen plan. They debate whether Russia would perhaps accept a lifting of the arms embargo for the Muslims in Bosnia. Moreover, they discuss the state of Germany's domestic debate on out-of-area missions.

March 2, 1993

The Chancellor's [Helmut Kohl's] Meeting with Korean President Kim Young-Sam on Tuesday, 2 March 1993 in Seoul

Kohl argues that the purpose of his journey to Asia was to show Germany’s continued interest in the world beyond German and European issues. Kohl and Kim discuss North Korea's nuclear program and the need for confidence building measures between South and North Korea as a precondition for the start of a meaningful dialogue.

January 12, 1993

The Chancellor's [Helmut Kohl's] Meeting with Secretary General of the United Nations, Dr. Boutros-Ghali, on Monday, 11 January 1993

Kohl and Ghali discuss Germany's international position after unification and the end of the Cold War. Kohl argues that many were surprised by the return of "old demons" in former Yugoslavia. He emphasizes the long-term objective of establish a new sort of European crisis management exluding a repetition of violent conflicts. This was the rational for his strong engagement in favor of the Maastricht Treaty.

Pagination