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October 4, 1995

The Chancellor's [Helmut Kohl's] Telephone Conversation with Iran’s President Rafsanjani on 2 October 1995 at 16.25 hours

Kohl and Rafsanjani discuss the relevance of Bosnia and Hercegovina as a key issue for the Muslim world. In addition, they talk about a new major German credit for Iran.

August 25, 1995

The Chancellor's [Helmut Kohl's] Telephone Conversation with Croatia’s President Tudjman on 25 August 1995 at 09.20 hours

Kohl emphasizes the need for a peaceful liberation of Eastern Croatia. Kohl urgently asks Tudjman to look into Croatian war crimes and human rights violations himself. Kohl wants Tudjman "to enforce discipline in the cases where the allegations were justified and penalize the people that had committed crimes."

August 18, 1995

The Chancellor's [Helmut Kohl's] Telephone Conversation with Prime Minister Major on 18 August 1995, 13.00 hours

Kohl and Major discuss the impact of the war in former Yugolavia on the Muslim world, the European Community and domestic U.S. policy. Both agree that there was a window of opportunity for a settlement before the winter.

July 20, 1995

The Chancellor's [Helmut Kohl's] Telephone Conversation with President Yeltsin on 20 July at 12.00 hours

Kohl wants Yeltsin to pressure the Bosnian Serbs into concession. Kohl's request for Yeltsin is to become engaged personally in such an effort.

July 20, 1995

The Chancellor's [Helmut Kohl's] Telephone Conversation with Yugoslavia Mediator Carl Bildt on 20 July 1995, 12.45 hours

Kohl and Bildt analyze the situation in former Yugoslavia and agree that the key NATO states were not willing to start  a war including hundreds of thousands of soldiers. Kohl says it was out the question for him to send German soldiers waging war in the Balkans.

July 18, 1995

Memorandum: Situation in former Yugoslavia, here: The Chancellor's [Helmut Kohl's] Telephone Conversation with Prime Minister Major on 17 July 1995

Kohl and Major discuss the situation in former Yugoslavia and the need to draw a red line to stop Serbian attacks in the Bosnian war. Both emphasize a potential change in NATO's posture moving from a a peace keeping operation toward a peace enforcing position entailing the possibility of full-fledged war against the Bosnian Serbs.

February 12, 1994

Cable, Secretary of State to US Office Berlin (Eyes Only for Ambassador Holbrooke), 'Memcon of Clinton-Kohl January 31 Lunch'

A U.S. summary of a meeting between Bill Clinton and Helmut Kohl.

February 3, 1994

The Chancellor's [Helmut Kohl's] Lunch Meeting with President Clinton in Washington on 31 January 1994

Kohl and Clinton review the state of NATO enlargement after the January 1994 NATO Summit in Brussels. They view NATO's Partnership for Peace (PfP) as the best solution to engage Russia and to reach out to the countries of Central and Eastern Europe. Both view the situation in Ukraine as a key factor in the search for Europe's post-Cold War order. "If anything happened in Ukraine, this would increase the pressure for the NATO accession of the Central and Eastern European countries," Clinton says.

May 12, 1993

The Chancellor's [Helmut Kohl's] Telephone Conversation with Russian President Yeltsin on 11 May 1993 17.30-17.40 hours

Kohl's request for Yeltsin is to put more political pressure on the Bosnian Serbs.

May 12, 1993

The Chancellor's [Helmut Kohl's] Meeting with ANC Chairman Nelson Mandela on Monday, 10 May 1993

Kohl and Mandela review the situation in South Africa after the end of Apartheid analyzing conflicts between the Inkatha and the ANC. Mandela asks for Germany's financial assistance. Kohl agrees to review the request as long as Mandela himself was his interlocator on financial support for the ANC.

Pagination