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Bandung Conference 1955

Bandung Conference, 1955

Leading representatives from twenty-nine newly independent African, Asian, and Middle Eastern countries came together for the Afro-Asian Conference in Bandung, Indonesia, from 19 April-24 April 1955. See also: The Second Asian-African Conference.

Bandung Conference 1955

Popular Documents

April 19, 1955

Main Speech by Premier Zhou Enlai, Head of the Delegation of the People's Republic of China, Distributed at the Plenary Session of the Asian-African Conference

Zhou Enlai calls for increased cooperation between the countries of Asia and Africa at the Bandung Conference.

October 19, 1954

Minutes of the First Meeting between Premier Zhou Enlai and Nehru

Zhou Enlai and Nehru discuss French and Portuguese colonialism in India and China, the Sino-American conflict, conflict in the Taiwan Straits, and the China issue at the United Nations.

October 19, 1954

Minutes of Chairman Mao Zedong’s First Meeting with Nehru

Mao Zedong and Nehru discuss Sino-Indian relations, the political situation in Asia, and the role of the United States in world politics.

June 22, 1954

Cable from Zhou Enlai, 'Premier’s Intentions and Plans to Visit India'

Zhou Enlai informed the Chinese government that his purposes of visiting India were to prepare the signing of an Asian peace and to build peace in the Indochina area. He also stated his plans regarding the negotiations of several treaties. The Chinese government agreed with his plans.

April 19, 1955

Supplementary Speech of Premier Zhou Enlai at the Plenary Session of the Asian African-Conference

Zhou Enlai claimed that although the PRC believed communism was positive, they did not come to the conference for the purpose of propaganda and wished to seek communality instead, otherwise they could have mentioned the Taiwan issue and the treatment of the PRC at the UN. He went on to stress that ideological and religious difference should not prevent countries from agreeing on fundamental points. Zhou also discussed China's opposition to interference in other countries' affairs.