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Conversations with Zhou Enlai

Zhou Enlai served as Premier of the People's Republic of China from October 1949 until his death in January 1976 and concurrently as the first Foreign Minister from 1949 through 1958. Zhou's involvement and influence on China's foreign policy was immense. This collection features hundreds of conversations that Zhou held with leaders from dozens of countries. See also the Digital Archvie collection: Conversations with Mao Zedong. (Photo: President Richard Nixon and Premier Zhou Enlai toast, February 25, 1972. (NARA NAID 194277, Image number  C8555-09A))

Popular Documents

February 21, 1972

Memorandum of Conversation between Chairman Mao Zedong and President Richard Nixon

Mao Zedong and Richard Nixon focus on "philosophic problems" in relations between China and the United States during their first meeting.

June 27, 1966

Excerpt from a Conversation between Zhou Enlai and Albanian Party Leaders, 27 June 1966

Zhou Enlai, Enver Hoxha, and Mehmet Shehu have a detailed conversation about high-level purges in the Chinese Communist Party. Zhou also discusses China's difficult relations with North Korea and the Vietnam War.

March 8, 1964

Record of Premier Zhou Enlai's Conversations with the President of Ghana Kwame Nkrumah

Over the course of three conversations, Zhou and Nkrumah discuss African regionalism, China's position at the United Nations and its relations with the United States, non-alignment, decolonization, developments in the Congo, and an African nuclear-weapons-free zone.

February 22, 1972

Memorandum of Conversation between Richard Nixon and Zhou Enlai

October 3, 1950

Transcript of Conversation between Zhou Enlai and K.M. Panikkar

Zhou Enlai talks with K.M. Panikkar about a letter from Jawaharlal Nehru asking about the North Korea issue and U.S. involvement on the Korean peninsula. Zhou expresses that if American soldiers cross the 38th parallel, then China will take charge of the issue. Zhou also communicates the desire from the Chinese side for the peaceful settlement of the Korea issuen through the UN, which will first require foreign armed forces to exit the Korean peninsula.