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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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Sino-Soviet Border Conflict, 1969

 The Sino-Soviet Border Conflict of 1969, taking place in the context of the broader split between the Chinese Communist Party and the Communist Party of the Soviet Union, occurred as a result of a territorial dispute relating to Damanskii or Zhenbao Island.

  • December 27, 1967

    East German Report on First Interkit Meeting in Moscow, December 1967

    Report from the East German representatives on the Interkit meeting held from 14-21 December in Moscow. Describes the meetings agenda and the drafting of a joint assessment on China. Notes that the "Soviet comrades were attributing extraordinary high importance to the undertaking" and were very concerned about Chinese anti-Sovietism.

  • March 01, 1969

    Polish-Soviet Talks in Moscow

    Gomulka and Brezhnev discuss Sino-Soviet border skirmishes. Brezhnev claims the Chinese are preparing for their Congress and trying to "cement the moods of enmity toward the USSR." They also discuss the possibility of improved Sino-American ties.

  • March 02, 1969

    Soviet Report to East German Leadership on Sino-Soviet Border Clashes

    Soviet report summarizing Sino-Soviet military clashes along the border and the island of Damansky.

  • March 15, 1969

    Mao Zedong's Talk at a Meeting of the Central Cultural Revolution Group (Excerpt)

    Mao Zedong claimed that the whole country should be prepared against the Soviet Union's invasion.

  • March 22, 1969

    Zhou Enlai's Report to Mao Zedong and Mao's Comments

  • April 02, 1969

    Telegram to East German Foreign Ministry from Ambassador to China

    East German Ambassador Oskar Fischer reports on Soviet attempts to meet with Mao or Zhou Enlai about the on-going Sino-Soviet border dispute.

  • April 03, 1969

    Report, Zhou Enlai to Mao Zedong and Lin Biao, 3 April 1969

  • June 26, 1969

    Letter from Mario Crema to Pietro Nenni

    Crema outlines the current trends of Chinese foreign policy as Chinese mission leaders abroad gradually return and border tensions with the USSR arise.

  • August 23, 1969

    Telegram from Aurel Duma to Corneliu Manescu Concerning the Conversation with Zhou Enlai

    Telegram from Aurel Duma detailing his meeting with Chinese premier Zhou Enlai. Enlai remarks that China believes Soviet citizens to be unhappy with the anti-China stance taken by the USSR. He also discusses Soviet interventions in Chinese territory, specifically Xinjiang.

  • August 28, 1969

    The CCP Central Committee's Order for General Mobilization in Border Provinces and Regions

  • September 11, 1969

    Note of Conversation between Ion Gheorge Maurer and Zhou Enlai on 11 September 1969

    Zhou Enlai describes his his meeting with Aleksey Kosygin to Ion Gheorge Maurer. The Enlai and Kosygin agree that they will keep the status quo along the Sino-Soviet border, as to not let it come to violence. They also agreed verbally to rework the old border treaties, created in the imperial era. Enlai holds that there are too many differences between China and the USSR to work out easily, but Maurer states that it is a good start.

  • September 11, 1969

    Soviet Report, Information on A.N. Kosygin’s Conversation With Zhou Enlai

    A.N. Kosygin met with Zhou Enlai, Li Xiannian, and Xie Fuzhi in an effort to improve strained relations between the Soviet Union and China. The main focus was the on-going Sino-Soviet border dispute. Kosygin also proposed the expansion of trade relations and economic cooperation as well as the normalizing of railroad and aviation connections. Significantly, the Soviet premier also acquiesced when Zhou declared that Beijing would not curtail its political and ideological criticism of the Soviet Union.

  • September 18, 1969

    Letter, Zhou Enlai to Alexei Kosygin

  • September 22, 1969

    Stenographic Record of Meeting of Khabarovsk Regional and City Party Officials

    Stenographic records of a meeting of Soviet Communist Party officials and activists in the regions bordering the People’s Republic of China. They respond to news of the meeting between Aleksei Kosygin and Zhou Enlai in Beijing on 11 September1969. Although they all applauded Kosygin’s meeting with Zhou, some speakers noted that little change in the border situation had been observed since their encounter eleven days before. Relations along the border remained tense with regular incursions from Chinese citizens into Soviet territory.

  • October 01, 1969

    Mao Zedong's Conversation with North Korean Official Choe Yong-geon (Excerpt), 1 October 1969, at the Tiananmen Gate

    Mao Zedong listed the common sense and common interests that China and North Korea share.

  • October, 1969

    Polish-Soviet Talks in Moscow

    Excerpts from Polish-Soviet talks that focus on the China question. Brezhnev posits that the Chinese were the source of ideological divergence, and more specifically that their attitude has progressed to anti-Sovietism and anti-communism. Included is a report from a meeting with Zhou Enlai, who in discussing Czechoslovakia said a "process of bourgeoisie transformation and corruption was taking place over there, which is normal for all of the socialist countries." He attributed the cultural revolution with cutting off the roots of corruption in China.

  • October 06, 1969

    Notes from a Conversation between Comrade Rakhmanin and Comrade Bruno Mahlow on Chinese Leadership and the Situation in China

    Rakhmanin discusses the topics addressed by Zhou Enlai and Comrade Kosygin in a recent meeting. He highlights such topics of conversation as Chinese/Soviet border lines, propaganda issues, Chinese domestic disturbances and foreign policies issues.

  • October 07, 1969

    Zhou Enlai's Talk at a Meeting of the Chinese Delegation Attending the Sino-Soviet Border Negotiation (Excerpt)

  • July 31, 1970

    Soviet Report on Soviet-Chinese Negotiations on Border Issues

    This report, prepared by the Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union, states Moscow's readiness to resume negotiations with Beijing on the issue of border clashes along the Soviet-Chinese border.