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Digital Archive International History Declassified

January 08, 1955

CABLE FROM PENG DI, 'REGARDING THE SITUATION OF THE BOGOR CONFERENCE'

This document was made possible with support from the MacArthur Foundation, Leon Levy Foundation

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    Peng Di reports on discussions at the Bogor Conference, including the status of the five principles of peaceful coexistence and inter-asian economic cooperation.
    "Cable from Peng Di, 'Regarding the Situation of the Bogor Conference'," January 08, 1955, History and Public Policy Program Digital Archive, PRC FMA 207-00002-04, 107-108. Translated by Jeffrey Wang. http://digitalarchive.wilsoncenter.org/document/115505
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Forward to: [Chen] Jiakang, Gong Peng

Priority Level: Rush

From: Indonesia

Date: 1955 January 8

Already forwarded to: [Zhou] Enlai, [Deng] Xiaoping, Chen Yi, [Xi] Zhongxun, Foreign Ministry, [Wang] Jiaxiang, [Li] Kenong, Su Yu, Peng Zhen, Xinhua News Agency, Military Unified [Command], Military Intelligence, Central Propaganda Department

Regarding the Situation of the Bogor Conference

To the Minstry of Foreign Affairs and Xinhua News Agency:

Number 4 [Report] regarding the situation of the Bogor conference:

(1) Regarding the principles of peaceful coexistence, the prime ministers of India and Burma proposed the principles but in order to avoid further arguments, they did not insist that the conference formally accept [the principles]. In order to obtain concessions from Pakistan and Ceylon on the issue of inviting China: India and Burma believed that other issues can be further resolved but the [item] of greatest importance is to strive for the invitation of China.

(2) The participant countries for the Afro-Asian conference are broad and complex, there are many political divisions [among them], therefore the Afro-Asian conference might heavily emphasize economic cooperation. Nehru publically expressed outside of the conference: Once there is development on the economic side, then problems on the political side will also be resolved; certain Burmese also have the same view. On one hand they have great hopes towards China in regards to economic and trade aspects; on the other hand since China has great influence, China’s actions carry weight; at the same time they hope that China can be more cautious in terms of politics. This view I believe is worth consulting. Prior to the Afro-Asian conference our country should begin to patiently strive for the solidarity of Afro-Asian countries through propaganda; to avoid exacerbating politically backward countries, do not bring forth slogans that are too premature or too grand.

(3) Antara Information Agency also unofficially expressed: Perhaps during the period of the Afro-Asian conference, each country’s information agency head can also come to exchange preliminary views on the establishment of an Asia information agency.

(4) Mayor of Coconut City [Jakarta], Sudiro, said: The government hopes that he can conduct a visit of China after the Afro-Asian conference. He said this time mayor Peng Zhen invited him and his wife to visit [Beijing] together, [Sudiro] expressed that this kind of friendly relationship is not only between governments, rather it is the relationship within the large Asia family. [Sudiro] proposed he hopes to convoke an Afro-Asian capital city mayor’s and city council head’s conference; however the Indonesian side estimated that within the next five years [Indonesia] will not have the capability to hold this kind of conference; therefore it is hoped that Mayor Peng Zhen can act as the convocator. [Sudiro] said it is not convenient for him to officially propose this view to Mayor Peng Zhen, and hopes that when I have the opportunity I can unofficially convey this view to Mayor Peng Zhen.

Peng Di

8 January 1955