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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • August 31, 1977

    The People’s Republic of Hungary Minister of Foreign Affairs’ Official Visit to the DPRK

    Telegram from the Romanian Embassy in Pyongyang to the Romanian Ministry of Foreign Affairs regarding the Hungarian Minister of Foreign Affairs' visit to the DPRK. It discusses the terms of a collaboration agreement between Romania and DPRK from 1977 to 1978 as well as Heo Dam's summary of North Korea's positions on international issues. Kim Il Sung's thoughts about the situation on the Korean peninsula and relations with third world countries are also mentioned.

  • September, 1977

    Draft Letter to B. Cardledge on Conversation with US Deputy Undersecretary of State Joseph Nye on South African Nuclear Intentions

    Nye stated that at present the United States preferred to "concentrate on pressing South Africa to adhere to the NPT rather than continuing to enquire about the nature of the Kalahari facility." The State Department assessment was that while South Africa was capable of building a bomb at short notice, they did not actually plan to test one at this time.

  • September, 1977

    Report, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Special Projects Division, 'South Africa: Motivations and Capabilities for Nuclear Proliferation'

    This report for the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) pointed to downsides of US and international pressures against pariah or otherwise beleaguered states such as South Africa and Israel and against would-be nuclear proliferants. They might cooperate to advance their goals.

  • September 02, 1977

    US Presidential Memorandum, Jimmy Carter Administration, Efforts to Promote a Dialogue between South and North

    The U.S. Department of State reports on discussions with China and efforts made to encourage the resumption of a dialogue between North Korea and South Korea.

  • September 02, 1977

    Message from Yugolav Embassy Addis Ababa, 'The Soviet Ambassador on the Ethiopian-Soviet Relations'

    A detailed view of Soviet reactions toward the Ethiopian-Somali conflict as of early September 1977, showing Moscow’s envoy to Addis Ababa’s conviction that Ethiopia would emerge victorious from the war. However, this document also gives a somewhat critical view on the part of Yugoslav’s diplomat regarding the Soviets’ unofficial and unsuccessful attempt to persuade Ethiopia to surrender part of Ogaden in order to appease the Somalis.

  • September 04, 1977

    Regarding President Tito’s Official Visit to the DPRK

    The Romanian Embassy in Pyongyang reports to the Romanian Ministry of Foreign Affairs on President Tito's visit to North Korea. The correspondence also summarizes the conversation between Tito and Kim Il Sung regarding the international communist movement, the Korean issue, and the Non-Aligned Movement.

  • September 05, 1977

    Memorandum of Conversation between Soviet Ambassador to Ethiopia Ratanov and Mengistu

    Memorandum of Conversation between Soviet Ambassador to Ethiopia Ratanov and Mengistu regarding fighting between Ethiopian and Somali forces and Ethiopia’s support of the People’s Independent Movement in Djibouti

  • September 06, 1977

    Memorandum of Conversation, Soviet Ambassador to Ethiopia A.P. Ratanov with US Charge d'Affaires A. Tienkin, 3 September 1977

    Memorandum of Conversation, Soviet Ambassador to Ethiopia A.P. Ratanov with U.S. Charge d'Affaires A. Tienkin regarding US feelings of improved US-Ethiopian and US-Somalian relations and US lack of interest in Soviet military aid to Ethiopia

  • September 07, 1977

    Letter from US Congressman Paul Findley to Brazilian Vice-President Adalberto Pereira dos Santos

    Findley proposes a system of mutual inspection of nuclear facilities between Argentina and Brazil. According to the agreement he proposed, Brazil and Argentina would renounce the intention to develop a nuclear device and would accept mutual inspections of their respective nuclear facilities.

  • September 07, 1977

    Report, Brazil, 'Official Mission to Washington, DC, While Representing Brazil at the Treaty Signing Ceremonies on the New Agreements Over the Panama Canal'

    Vice-President Adalberto Pereira reports on a meeting with Republican Congressman Paul Findley, who proposed, on a personal basis, the creation of a nuclear mutual surveillance system between Brazil and Argentina, with a view to allaying doubts about a possible arms race. Findley had already presented the proposal to Ambassador Geraldo Holanda Cavalcanti, (aide to Minister Silveira) on the occasion of the visit to Brasília on August 23 1977. According to the agreement he proposed, Brazil and Argentina would renounce the intention to develop a nuclear device and would accept mutual inspections of their respective nuclear facilities.

  • September 08, 1977

    Letter from J.S. Wall to Bryan Cartledge, 'South African Nuclear Intentions'

    J.S. Wall of the UK Foreign and Commonweath Office reports on a conversation with David Aaron of the US National Security Council on concerns about South Africa's possible nuclear testing facility in the Kalahari desert.

  • September 10, 1977

    Soviet Ambassador to Ethiopia A.P. Ratanov, Memorandum of Meeting with Mengistu

    Soviet Ambassador to Ethiopia A.P. Ratanov, memorandum of meeting with Mengistu with heads of diplomatic missions for the European socialist countries regarding the "imperialist" plot on the part of the US and other countries to overthrow the Ethiopian government

  • September 12, 1977

    Bulgarian Politburo Decision on Coordination of Trade Policy with China

    The Politburo of the Bulgarian Communist Party (BCP) decides to foster collaboration between the Ministries of Foreign Trade and Foreign Affairs on issues concerning Bulgarian-Chinese trade relations.

  • September 13, 1977

    Memorandum from C.L.G. Mallaby of the UK Arms Control and Disarmament Department, 'South Africa and the Non-Proliferation Treat'

    Mallaby outlines the UK position on South African accession to the Non-Proliferation Treaty.

  • September 14, 1977

    Memorandum of Conversation between Soviet Ambassador to Ethiopia A.P. Ratanov and Ethiopian Foreign Minister Feleke Gedle-Giorgis

    Ratanov and Giorgis discuss the reactions of various countries to the news of the Ethiopian Revolution. They also talk about the war going on with Somalia and various other events going on in the Horn of Africa.

  • September 15, 1977

    State Department telegram 222114 to U.S. Embassy Paris, 'Nuclear Suppliers Meeting'

    This document reflects that while full-scope safeguards had wide support in the group, both the French and the West German remained opposed. The Carter administration tried to persuade the French but they were worried about being "isolated" in the group and talked about withdrawing or opposing further meetings because the NSG had “fully achieved” its objectives. Washington persuaded Paris not to withdraw, but the group’s future was plainly uncertain.

  • September 19, 1977

    Telegram from South African Embassy in Washington to the Department of Foreign Affairs Summarizing a Washington Star Newspaper Article on 'South Africa and the Bomb'

    Summary of Washington Star newspaper article on Carter administration concerns that South Africa was developing nuclear weapons.

  • September 21, 1977

    Telegram 066734 from the Romanian Embassy in Pyongyang to the Romanian Ministry of Foreign Affairs

    In a telegram to the Romanian Ministry of Foreign Affairs, the Romanian Embassy in Pyongyang confirms the date of the East German visit to the DPRK led by Erich Honecker.

  • September 21, 1977

    Letter from C.L.G. Mallaby of the UK Arms Control and Disarmament Department to H.M.S. Reid, 'South African Nuclear Intentions: the Kalahari Facility'

    Mallaby reports on a conversation at the Nuclear Suppliers Meeting with the US Deputy Under-Secretary for Security Assistance, Nye, on whether the US would raise the issue of South Africa's Kalahari nuclear testing facility. The US assumption was that the South Africans intended to "be on the brink of having a nuclear weapons capability" in order to "moderate Western diplomatic pressure on her about racial and other issues."

  • September 22, 1977

    Letter from H.M.S. Reid to Mr. Mallaby, 'South African Nuclear Intentions: the Kalahari Facility'

    In response to Mallaby's letter, Reid dismisses the American explanation for the South African Kalahari nuclear testing facility. He believes that the South Africans "feel increasingly threatened and foresee a possible need to use nuclear weapons in their own defence if it should come to that."