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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • May 24, 1989

    Note on Meeting with Comrade Ri Jong-geun on 24 May 1989

    Ri Jong-geun requests that East Germany provide the DPRK with information of Korean nationals in the GDR.

  • May 26, 1989

    Telegram from the Romanian Embassy in Beijing to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs

    Telegram from the Romanian Embassy in Beijing to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs regarding the possible power struggle within the Chinese government and attitudes towards the demands of the students

  • May 31, 1989

    Bulgarian Politburo Decision on Appointment of New Bulgarian Ambassador to China

    This document records a decision of the Politburo of the Bulgarian Communist Party to appoint Philip Markov as the new Bulgarian ambassador to China.

  • May 31, 1989

    Stenographic transcript of the meeting of the Defense Council of the Socialist Republic of Romania

  • June 03, 1989

    Information Note from Romanian Embassy in Beijing to Ministry of Foreign Affairs

    Information Note from Romanian Embassy in Beijing to Ministry of Foreign Affairs regarding the situation in Tiananmen Square and the return of students to classes

  • June 03, 1989

    Information Note from Romanian Embassy in Beijing to Ministry of Foreign Affairs

    Information from the Romanian Embassy in Beijing to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs regarding the measures to be taken by the Chinese government as a result of the Tiananmen Square crisis and the possible direction in which China will move as a result

  • June 04, 1989

    Information Note from Romanian Embassy in Beijing to Ministry of Foreign Affairs, 03:30 am

    Information Note from Romanian Embassy in Beijing to Ministry of Foreign Affairs regarding the routing of demonstrators from Tiananmen Square

  • June 04, 1989

    Telegram from Romanian Embassy in Beijing to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, 04:15 am

    Telegram from Romanian Embassy in Beijing to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs regarding the return of several PRC officials who had been absent for a number of weeks

  • June 04, 1989

    Telegram from the Romanian Embassy in Beijing to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, 05:45 am

    Telegram from the Romanian Embassy in Beijing to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs regarding the arrival of 25,000 soldies to Tiananmen Square and the removal of students from the Square

  • June 04, 1989

    Telegram from Romanian Embassy in Beijing to Ministry of Foreign Affairs, 03:00 am

    Telegram from Romanian Embassy in Beijing to Ministry of Foreign Affairs regarding the events in Beijing as troops attempted to reach Tiananmen Square to end the protest

  • June 04, 1989

    Telegram from Romanian Embassy in Beijing to Ministry of Foreign Affairs, 03:15 am

    Telegram from Romanian Embassy in Beijing to Ministry of Foreign Affairs regarding the increased mobilization of tanks, armored trucks and paratroopers to clear the protest in Tiananmen Square, with the reported number of deaths and injuries

  • June 05, 1989

    Transcript of the Central Committee Secretariat Meeting of the Polish United Workers Party (PZPR)

    On the day after Solidarity had swept Poland’s first open elections, ultimately winning 99 of 100 Senate seats, the Polish Communists vent their shock and dismay ("a bitter lesson," "the party are not connected with the masses," "We trusted the Church and they turned out to be Jesuits" were typical comments). Comrade Kwasniewski (who was later elected President of Poland) remarks that "It’s well known that also party members were crossing out our candidates" (only two out of 35 Party candidates survived the epidemic of X’s). But they see no choice but to negotiate a coalition government, and specifically "[w]arn against attempts at destabilization, pointing at the situation in China" -- since the Tiananmen massacre occurred the same day as the Polish elections, the road not taken.

  • June 06, 1989

    Bulgarian Politburo Discussion on Radio Free Europe Monitoring Reports (excerpt)

    This extract from a Politburo discussion indicates the attention paid to monitoring Western broadcasts for the top Party elite and Party leader Zhivkov’s impatience with the regime monitors’ focus on RFE broadcasts.

  • June 06, 1989

    Meeting of the Politburo of the Central Committee of the Bulgarian Communist Party

    Discussion of broadcasts of "Radio Free Europe" and other Western media on Bulgaria's policies towards the country's Turkish minority.

  • June 07, 1989

    Information Note of Romanian Embassy in Beijing to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs

    Note from the Romanian Embassy in Beijing to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs regarding the situation in Beijing in the aftermath of Tiananmen Square and the institution of restrictive measures under the rubric of martial law

  • June 08, 1989

    Assessment Paper by the Austrian Foreign Ministry, '[Excerpt] Eastern Europe; Current Assessment'

    The paper addresses the change in economics, politics, and social structures in the Soviet bloc (Czechoslovakia, Bulgaria, Hungary, and the GDR) as a result of the USSR loosening up regulations.

  • June 09, 1989

    Records of the Talks between GDR Comrade Erich Honecker, and Member of the Politburo and Minister for Foreign Affairs the USSR, Eduard A. Shevardnadze

    GDR Chairman Honecker and Shevardnadze discuss the state of the German Democratic Republic and the CPSU's outlook on and relationship with East Germany, as well as both of their perspectives on the sociopolitical landscape in Poland, its recent election and the battle to maintain socialism in Poland.

  • June 10, 1989

    Secret Instructions by State Security (MfS) Chief Erich Mielke to Heads of all State Security Units

    In response to Western reports about the Tiananmen Square protests, Chief Erich Mielke alerts State Security to suppress all offensive anti-Chinese activity and propaganda in the GDR.

  • June 10, 1989

    Agreement about the Commencement of Substantial Political Negotiations between the Hungarian Socialist Workers’ Party, the Members of the Opposition Roundtable and the Organizations of the Third Side

    The agreement was signed at the first plenary meeting of the National Roundtable talks. The document put on record the legal framework and the conditions of the subsequent tripartite negotiations which lasted until 18 September. At the next meeting, on 21 June, two intermediate-level committees were established for political and social-economic issues, each having six working subcommittees in which the bulk of the legal work leading to the establishment of parliamentary democracy in Hungary was carried out. Between March and June the crucial question of the transition was whether the Hungarian Socialist Workers’ Party [HSWP] was willing to eventually accept the fact that it would have to negotiate with a unified opposition represented by the Opposition Roundtable [ORT]. Although the HSWP leadership tried to do everything it could to prevent this, by the beginning of June it gave up its previous position. However, the opposition parties had to make a serious concession too, since it was a precondition of the HSWP in agreeing to start official negotiations on the political transition with the ORT that the talks should be tripartite. The “third side” included mass organizations and civil associations, all of which were supporters of the HSWP and/or represented left-wing political ideas.

  • June 12, 1989

    Record of the First Conversations Between Mikhail Gorbachev and FRG President Richard von Weizsäcker

    Gorbachev and Weizsäcker discuss Soviet-American relations and the Bush administration.