Search in
ADD SEARCH FILTER CANCEL SEARCH FILTER

Digital Archive International History Declassified

July 28, 1978

CABLE NO. 1434, AMBASSADOR SATO TO THE FOREIGN MINISTER, 'TREATY OF PEACE AND FRIENDSHIP BETWEEN JAPAN AND CHINA NEGOTIATIONS (5TH MEETING, PART II)'

CITATION SHARE DOWNLOAD
  • Citation

    get citation

    The meeting covered the work put into the Treaty over the years of its creation and diplomatic relations considerations.
    "Cable No. 1434, Ambassador Sato to the Foreign Minister, 'Treaty of Peace and Friendship between Japan and China Negotiations (5th Meeting, Part II)'," July 28, 1978, History and Public Policy Program Digital Archive, 2010-367, Act on Access to Information Held by Administrative Organs. Also available at the Diplomatic Archives of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Japan. Contributed by Yutaka Kanda and translated by Stephen Mercado. https://digitalarchive.wilsoncenter.org/document/220008
  • share document

    https://digitalarchive.wilsoncenter.org/document/220008

VIEW DOCUMENT IN

English HTML

Number: (TA) R054156     5357

Primary: Asian Affairs Bureau Director-General

Sent: China, July 28, 1978,   02:35

Received: MOFA, July 28, 1978,   04:08

To: The Foreign Minister      

From: Ambassador Sato

Treaty of Peace and Friendship between Japan and China Negotiations (5th Meeting – Part 2)

No. 1434 Secret Top Urgent

(Limited Distribution)

Re: Outgoing Telegram No. 1433

1. At the start of the meeting, after he had finished listening to my statement, outgoing telegram 3. [sic], Vice Minister Han said that before going on break he would like to add a supplementary explanation regarding the statement I had given. He spoke as follows:

China and Japan in 1972 realized a formal normalization of relations. The prime ministers of the governments of our two countries signed the Sino-Japanese Joint Statement for the normalization of relations between our two countries. The Joint Statement contains very important content. That is, namely, the anti-hegemony clause, by which we made clear that neither of our two countries seeks hegemony in the Asia-Pacific region and, at the same time, each is opposed to attempts by any country or group of countries to establish hegemony in this region. It can be said that this Joint Statement is a principle that both our countries should observe in our relations and, as well, a fundamental basis and principle that solidifies and develops our relations. Of course, there are other contents as well in this Joint Statement. However, this clause is a very important one in the formation of the Joint Statement. The leaders of both our governments signed themselves this Joint Statement. For close to six years, our two sides both have basically referred to this. Both sides in this Joint Statement stipulated that we should conclude in total five agreements and a treaty. Of those, we have already seen the signing of four agreements. As we see it, every one of those four agreements is in agreement with the spirit of the Joint Statement. If we were to speak of unfinished tasks among those stipulated in the Joint Statement, that would only be the conclusion of the China-Japan Treaty of Peace and Friendship.  

Of course, it is not the case that there were no disputes or differences of opinion between our two sides in the course of concluding the four agreements just mentioned. In negotiations for every one of the agreements, after all, we spent a considerable amount of time and carried out not a few exchanges of opinion. However,  those negotiations were not so long as those for the China-Japan Treaty of Peace and Friendship have been, nor was there the controversy that there has been with the treaty.

Three and a half years have already passed. In this period, on the Japanese side, there has been a change in ambassadors. As for myself, I have from the start spoken with Japanese friends about this issue. One could say that I put forth the first first draft of the treaty when I visited Japan in November 1974. It is something put forth rigorously and strictly in accord with the Joint Statement and based on a practical spirit. In 1974, when I visited Japan, I met Vice Foreign Minister Togo, Foreign Minister Kimura, Chief Cabinet Secretary Nikaido, Prime Minister Tanaka, and other friends. In this visit, I held talks mostly with Vice Minister Togo, but I also talked regarding the treaty’s basic contents with Prime Minister Tanaka and Foreign Minister Kimura. My impression was that all the Japanese friends who heard of it were very happy. When I had talks with Vice Minister Togo, there were arguments, of course. At that time, we did not delve into points of dispute and exchange opinions, so there was no controversy. Also, at that time, the situation was one of the Chinese side having just put forth a treaty draft and the Japanese side needing time to examine it. At that time, I did not expect that the negotiations would drag on for thereafter for three and a half years.  I hope to carry out these treaty talks in my time in office as vice minister. The previous ambassador, Ambassador Ogawa, had a similar hope, and I think that Ambassador Sato, does as well. I do not wish to do anything that would make negotiations worse or such that this treaty would not be concluded. I believe it to be the same for the Japanese side. Personally speaking, I would like to continue making even more efforts for this. I hope, in so doing, that the treaty talks quickly succeed.

Differences on our two sides over the issue of the anti-hegemony clause are still relatively large. I request that Ambassador Sato, Director-General Nakae, and each and every friend of the Japanese side’s delegation once again examine in detail this issue.

China is a socialist country. China's diplomatic policy has been set by Chairman Mao Zedong and Premier Zhou Enlai. Since the founding of the People’s Republic of China 27, 28 years ago, we have carried out this policy accordingly. We will continue to follow such a spirit. Our spirit is one of sincerity. Relations between our two countries must be equal and reciprocal, and the treaty’s conclusion must be satisfactory to both sides. We have never deliberately pressed unreasonable demands upon the Japanese side. That is not the way we do things. We do not think that there would be any profit to be gained from such a way of doing things. Our attitude is to hold frank and honest talks with sincerity. We always agree with what is reasonable. However, we frankly express an attitude of rejecting what is unacceptable. We have repeatedly made clear time and again our thinking so that  our Japanese friends may well understand our view. I think that, if we regard the course of the talks over the past few days, the Chinese side basically understands the Japanese side’s thinking and the Japanese side clearly understands the Chinese side’s thinking. It is clear where the difficulties in the treaty negotiations lie. We know where the main problem points are. Frankly speaking, there are no difficulties on the Chinese side. I hope that each friend of the Japanese delegation once again examines our view seriously, in detail, and with rigor.

2. I replied to this as follows:

I think that it has been a benefit and a pleasure to hear just now in great detail Vice Minister Han’s feeling or frame of mind on the negotiations. Vice Minister Han said that a treaty should be concluded to the satisfaction of both sides and that it is not something that one side presses on the other. I, too, have been involved with treaties for over 30 years. Reflecting that experience, the good or bad of a treaty, a good treaty never comes of one side’s imposing its position on the other side, which would always be far from the actual circumstances. A treaty is an expression on paper of the actual relationship between two countries. It is not possible for the relationship to change by treaty nor for to unreasonably change it. In mutually exchanging opinions and understanding one another, a treaty is possible in starting from such understanding. I think it would be ideal if the Treaty of Peace and Friendship between Japan and China came into being in such a way. In that sense, I would like to continue conducting frank exchanges of opinion with Vice Minister Han.

3. Next, when I proposed unofficial talks, Vice Minister Han agreed to it: “Other than the full session, having separate, non-official meetings is commonly seen, so China also often adopts this method. I think that this method will probably be useful in obtaining mutual understanding.” With this prefatory statement, he suddenly spoke as if the cause of the negotiations not having progressed in over three years was on the Japanese side.  I therefore countered: “What I saying by non-official talks is not discussing substantial treaty issues but talking about ways to move the treaty talks forward.” I then said the following:

The center of the issue is clearly the point that Vice Minister Han indicated. Continuing to stick to our own opposing views, as we are now doing, is unwise and contrary to our mutual interests.

I would therefore like to offer my thoughts.

The basic thinking of both our countries was nearly in agreement over the course of the first, second, and third meetings. I think that each understood the other’s position on part of it. I simply cannot understand why, despite each side’s understanding of the other’s position, such great differences of opinion have emerged in the writing of the particulars of the treaty drafts. I think that it may be due to more and more misunderstanding concerning treaty draft interpretation and implication, as well as to some sense of distrust.

Regarding what Vice Minister Han said before the break, too, I think it is less a great difference in substance differing than it is a difference in how to express it.

4. Next, when I said that I wanted him to point out if what I had said was wrong, Vice Minister Han said:

“I recently said that the Chinese and Japanese people must associate with one another for generations to come, but there must be formal diplomatic relations between our two countries and that the statements, treaties, and agreements of both countries should be equal, fair, and just. We must also place emphasis on the Chinese and Japanese people’s friendship extending forever into the future. We must solve issues from a political viewpoint.” After saying that, he spoke of China’s understanding of the international situation before, for approximately 10 minutes, developing at length the view based on the so-called “Three Worlds theory.” He then said:

The Ambassador said that there is misunderstanding between us in our understanding of the treaty, but I think that there is no misunderstanding. Nor do I think there is a sense of distrust. Nor is it an issue of phrasing. It is one of substance. As I have repeatedly made clear, I think that this issue cannot be resolved if it cannot avoid outside interference and pressure. This issue is, after all, one that must await the serious consideration of Japanese statesmen.

5. To this, I replied:

“I will give a supplementary explanation on a single point: the issue of expression just mentioned. It may be a misunderstanding. I think that the fundamental thinking is the same but that it is an issue of expression, including whether one expresses it or not.” When I said that, Vice Minister Han, “The issue between us is not simply one of phrasing, but one of substance. It is whether or not it agrees with the spirit of the Sino-Japanese Joint Statement. If the Japanese side’s thinking does not agree with that spirit, we cannot agree with that thinking.”

6. Next, I asked, “Vice Minister Han just spoken of an issue for Japanese statesmen to seriously examine. We have done so at the working level until now. Are you hoping for a meeting at the political level?” When I asked that, Vice Minister Han strongly denied it,  saying, “That’s not what I meant. We are diplomats and, at the same time, statesmen. We have a detailed knowledge of diplomacy, of course but, at the same time, Ambassador Sato and each member of the delegation present here ought to have an understanding of politics.”

6. Next, when I inquired as to future meetings, Vice Minister Han answered that he would like to hear the thinking of the Japanese side on when and what kind of issues to discuss. When I proposed   that tomorrow I did not want to speak on the basis of a text but wanted to hold an informal meeting, Vice Minister Han agreed, saying that there were two formats-- that of delegation members meeting alone without the delegation heads and that of the delegation head and one or two members from each side – and that he would leave the decision to the Japanese side. I said that for now I wanted to adopt the format of all members meeting tomorrow and that we would think there on how to proceed with the talks. As for the time, I said that I wanted to start per usual from three o’clock in the afternoon. Vice Minister Han then agreed to it. The meeting ended there.

(End)

JAPANESE (TRANSCRIPTION) HTML

極秘

総番号 (TA) R054156  5357  主管

78年  月28日02時35分  中国発

78年07月28日04時08分  本省着  ア局長

外務大臣殿  佐藤大使

日中平和友好条約交渉(第5回会談-その2)

第1434号 極秘 大至急

(限定配布)

往電第1433号に関し

1.冒頭往電3.の本使の発言を聞き終わると韓副部長は休けい前に行なつた発言につき補じゆう説明を加えたいとして、次のとおり述べた。

中日両国は1972年に正式に国交正常化を実現した。われわれ両国政府の総理は、両国関係の正常化のために中日共同声明に調印した。共同声明の中には非常に重要な内容が含まれている。それはすなわち反は権条項であり、それによつて中日両国は双方ともアジア・太平洋地域において、は権を求めないと同時に、いかなる国あるいは国の集団がこの地域においては権を確立しようとする試みにも反対することを明らかにした。この共同声明はわれわれ両国関係において双方ともじゆん守すべき原則であり、また両国関係を強固にし、発展させる根本的基礎であり原則であると言える。もち論この共同声明の中には他の内容もある。しかしこの条項は共同声明を構成する非常に重要な条項である。双方の政府首のうは自らこの共同声明に署名した。6年近くの間、われわれ双方はともに基本的にこれに照らしてやつてきた。双方は共同声明の中に合計5つの協定または条約を締結すべきことを規定した。そのうち既に4つの協定については調印をみた。この4つの協定は、いずれも共同声明の精しんに合致するものと私達は見ている。もし共同声明の中で規定された任務のうち完成されていないものがあるとすれば、それは中日平和友好条約の締結だけである。

もち論先に述べた4つの協定が締結される過程において双方の間に論争や意見の相異がなかつた訳ではない。どの協定のどの交渉においても、やはり相当の時間と少なからぬ意見の交換を行なつてきた。しかしそれらの交渉は中日平和友好条約交渉のように、これほど長い時間がかかつたものはなく、また条約の場合ほど激しい論争もなかつた。

今既に3年半が過ぎ去つたが、日本側ではこの間2人の大使が交替した。私自身について言えば、私は条約交渉の最初から日本の友人とこの問題につき話し合つてきた。条約の最初の草案は、私が1974年11月に日本を訪問した時に提出したとも言えよう。それは共同声明に厳しゆく、かつ真けんに照らして、また実際に即した精しんに基づき提出されたものである。74年に日本を訪問した時、私はトウゴウ次官、木村外相、ニカイドウ官房長官、タナカ首相及びその他の友人に会つた。この訪問中、条約については主にトウゴウ次官との間で交渉を行なつたが、条約の基本的な内容についてはタナカ首相や木村外相とも話をした。私の印象ではそれを聞いた日本の友人はみな非常によろこんでいた。私がトウゴウ次官と交渉した時ももち論、論争もあつた。当時は論点をほり下げて意見交換をしなかつたので激しいものではなかつた。また当時は、中国側が条約案を提出したばかりであり日本側に検討する時間が必要であつたという事情もある。その後交渉が3年半も長びくといつたようなことは当時予想もしなかつた。私は、この条約交渉を私の次官在任中にやりとげたいと希望している。同様の希望を小川前大使も持つておられたが、多分サトウ大使も同様の希望を持つておられることと思う。交渉が悪化し、この条約が妥結できなくなるというようなことはしたくない。日本側も同様と信じている。私自身について言えば、そのために更に努力を続けたいと思う。そして条約交渉が早く成功することを希望している。

 反は権条項の問題における双方の意見のくい違いは、依然として比較的大きい。サトウ大使、ナカエ局長及び日本側代表団の友人各位が、この問題を改めて詳細に検討されるようお願いする。

 中国は、社会主義の国である。中国の外交政策は、毛タク東主席とシュウオン来総理が制定したもので、われわれは、中華人民共和国成立以来、この27、8年間に、その政策に則り外交を行つてきた。また、今後も引続きかかる精しんに則つていこうとしている。われわれの精しんは、誠実ということである。両国の関係は平等互恵でなければならないし、条約締結は双方共満足のいくようなものにしなければならない。私達は、故意に日本側に難題を押しつけたことはない。それは私達のやり方ではない。われわれはそうしたやり方によつて、何らかの利益が得られるとは考えない。

 真心をこめてかつきたんなく素直に話し合いを行うというのが私達の態度である。私達は、条理にかなうものには必らず同意する。しかし、それが受け入れ難いものであればそれを拒絶する態度を率直に示す。

 日本の友人に私達の意見を十分理解していただくために、私達の考えを再三再四明らかにした。ここ数日間の会談の経過を見れば中国側は日本側の考えを基本的には理解しているものと思うし、また、日本側は中国側の考えをはつきり理解していると考える。この条約交渉における困難はどこにあるかははつきりしている。かんじんの問題点がどこにあるのかははつきりしている。率直に言えば中国側には何らの困難もない。日本代表団の友人各位がわれわれの意見を再び真けん、詳細かつ厳しゆくに検討されることを希望する。

2.これに対し本使より、次のとおり述べた。

 ただ今韓副部長より非常に詳細に交渉に当る気持ちあるいは心構えをおうかがいできたことは有益かつきんかいに思う。韓副部長は、条約は双方が満足する形で締結すべきであり、また、一方が他方に一方的に押しつけるものではないと言われた。私も30年以上条約に関連したし事をしてきたが、その経験に照らすと条約の良し悪しというものは、一方が一方の立場を押しつけた場合には決して良い条約が出来ず、必らずや実情とかけ離れたものになつてしまう。条約というものは、二国間の実際の関係を紙に表わすものであり、条約によりその関係が変つたりあるいはそれを無理に変えることはできない。

 お互に意見の交換をし、相互にりよう解し合い、そのりよう解の上に始めて条約ができうる。このような形で日中平和友好条約が出来れば理想的であると思う。そういう意味で私は今後とも韓副部長との間で率直に意見交換したいと考える。

3.次いで本使より、非公式会談を提案したところ、韓副部長は、これに同意し、「全体会議の他に別途非公式会議を持つことは一般によく見られることで、中国もこの方法をよく採つている。この方法は恐らく双方のりよう解を得るのに役立つと思う」と前置きしていきなり本件交渉が3年以上も進ちよくしなかつた原因があたかも日本側にあるかのごとき発言を行なつたので、これに対し、本使より「私が言う非公式会談といつたのは、条約の実質問題を討議するのではなく、条約交渉の進め方について話しをすることである」と断つた上、次の通り述べた。

問題の中心は韓副部長が指てきされた点にあることは明確である。現在のような形で双方が自説を固持して対立を続けることは知恵のない話であるし、双方の利益ににも反する。

そこで私の考えを申し上げたい。

両国の基本的な考え方は、第一回、第二回、第三回会談を経て、殆ど一ちし一部については、相手の立場をよく理解したものと考える。双方の立場が理解されたにもかかわらずどうして具体的な条約文の書き方に意見の大きな食い違いが出るのか私は必ずしも理解できない。これは双方において夫々の条約文の解釈とIMPLICATION即ち含意について誤解があるか、何等かの不信感があるのが原因ではないかと考える。

休けい前にうかがつた韓副部長の話からも、非常に実質が違つているというよりも、如何に表現するかに差があるということであると思う。

4.続いて、本使より、上述の本使の考えが違つているなら指てきしてほしいと述べたところ、韓副部長は

「私は先程中日両国人民は子子そんそんにわたつてつき合つて行かねばならないと述べたが、両国は正式な外交関係を有しており、両国の声明、条約、協定のいずれにおいても平等、公正かつ当然あるべきものでなければならず、また中日人民のえいえんの将来にわたる友情に重点を置き、政治的見地から問題を処理しなければならない」と述べた後、中国の国際情勢に対する認識を述べるとして約10分程、いわゆる「三つの世界論」に基く見解を長々と展開し、更に、次のとおり述べた。

大使は、私たちの間に条約に対する理解において誤解があると言われたが、双方には誤解はないと思う。また不信感もないと思う。また文字上の表現の問題ではなく、実質の問題である。私が再三明らかにしたとおり、外からの干渉と圧力からぬけられないものなら、この問題は解決できないと思う。この問題は、やはり日本の政治家の真けんな検討に持たねばならない。

5.これに対し、本使より、

「1点のみ先程の表現の問題について補足証明する。これは、あるいは誤解かもしれないが、基礎にある考え方は同じであるが、それを表現するかしないかをも含めた意味での表現の問題であると考える。」と述べたところ、韓副部長は、「われわれの間の問題は、単に文字上の表現の問題ではなく、実質の問題である。それは、中日共同声明の精しんに合ちしているかどうかであり、もし、日本側の考えが、その精しんに合ちしていなければ、われわれは、その様な考えに同意できない。」と述べた。

6.次に本使より、「韓副部長は先程政治家が真けんに検討する問題と言われたが、これは事務レベルでの会談はこれまでにし、政治レベルの会談を希望しているのか。」と問うたところ、韓副部長は「そのような意味ではない。われわれは、外交官であると同時に政治家である。われわれは、外交に詳しいことはもち論であるが、同時にサトウ大使、在席の代表団各位は政治についての認識を持つているはずである。」と強く否定した。

7.次いで本使より、今後の会議について問うたところ、韓副部長は何時どういう問題を話すか日本側の考えをききたいと答えたので、本使より、明日原こうに基づいて発言するのではない非公式会談を行いたい旨提案したところ、韓副部長は、これに同意し双方の団長を除いた団員のみの形式、双方の団長と1-2名のみの形式もあるが、日本側におまかせすると述べたので、本使より、とりあえず明日は一応全員出席する形式をとり、そこで会談のとり進め方を考えることとし、時間は、従来通り午後3時から開始したい旨述べたところ、韓副部長はこれに同意し、以上をもつて会談を終了した。

(了)

ORIGINAL SCAN PDF

It appears your Web browser is not configured to display PDF files. No worries, just click here to download the PDF file.

Click here to view the PDF file in a new window.

PDFs cannot be printed inline in the page. To print a PDF, you must first download the file and open it in a PDF viewer.