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Bodiul, Ivan Ivanovich

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Popular Documents

July 1, 1966

Moldavian Communist Party Central Committee, No. 101 s, to CPSU Central Committee

Moldavian leader Bodiul calls upon the central authorities in Moscow to respond to Romanian propaganda which stated that there was no separate Moldavian ethnic or political identity. He advocates the generation of publications to “objectively expose” Romanian and bourgeois interpretations “from a class position and in the interests of the socialist community of nations;” and requests assistance in preparing "in the Moldavian language, Russian and in a series of foreign languages a series of historical studies (monographs, brochures, atlases, etc.) and articles in central periodicals, on the radio and television broadcasts that bring to the attention of wider public opinion—Soviet and foreign—the truth about the Moldavian people, about its authentic history and about the true reality of its contemporary life."

June 3, 1968

Transcript No. 53 of the Meeting of the Central Committee Bureau of the Moldavian Communist Party

The Moldavian Communist Party discusses a decision by the Communist Party of the Soviet Union Central Committee approving measures for "improving ideological work in the republic," i.e. combating Romanian propaganda which undermined the separate ethnic and political identity of MoldThe MCP instructed a variety of institutions to cooperate in strictly regulating and reducing the entry of Romanian publications, broadcasts, information, and tourism into the republic; to create a propaganda base within the republic that would include increase numbers of publications and broadcasts, and new radio and television broadcast facilities; and to launch a new ideological offensive to combat Romanian influence.

July 20, 1978

Moldavian Communist Party Central Committee, No. 179 ss, to CPSU Central Committee, 'Information Regarding the Intensification in Romania of a Propaganda Campaign
that Harms the Interests of the USSR'

The Moldavian Communist Party reports on the increasingly anti-Soviet nature of nationalist propaganda in Russia. Moldavian authorities were concerned by how this propaganda denied the existence of a separate Moldavian ethnic identity, while Soviet authorities were especially concerned by Bucharest’s role in attempting to consolidate an anti-Soviet Eurocommunism.

December 6, 1978

Moldavian Communist Party Central Committee, No. 294s, to President of the USSR Committee for State Security (KGB), Andropov, 'Regarding the Necessity of Increasing the Number of Personnel of the Moldavian SSR KGB'

The Moldavian Communist Party requests an increase in the number of KGB personnel in Moldavia to assist with efforts to "curb subversive activity" originating in Romania. This “ideological subversion” was further propagated by the Romanian print and broadcast media, through direct mailings (mail correspondence having “surpassed 500 thousand letters per year”) and through Romanian citizens visiting the republic who sought to indoctrinate the Soviet people “in an anti-Soviet, anti-Russian spirit."

April 5, 1976

Communist Party of Moldovia Central Committee, No. 125 s, to CPSU Central Committee, 'On the Creation of a Sector on the History of the International Communist Movement within the Institute of Party History at the Moldavian Communist Party'

As part of the campaign to combat nationalist Romanian propaganda, the Moldavian leader informs the CPSU CC about the creation of a new section in the Moldavian Institute of Party History. This new section would include "a group of specialists... familiarized with the works of Romanian authors, [and] knowing the languages of the countries whose parties made up the Balkan Communist Federation."