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Sino-Soviet Relations

This is a catch-all collection for sources on Sino-Soviet relations. Its contents are described in an essay by Charles Kraus, "The Sino-Soviet Alliance, 70 Years Later" (February 2020). To see focused collections that deal with specific periods of the Sino-Soviet relationship during the Cold War, see (1) Making of the Sino-Soviet Alliance, 1945-1950; (2) Sino-Soviet Alliance, 1950-1959; (3) Sino-Soviet Split, 1960-1984; (4) Sino-Soviet Border Conflict, 1969; and (5) Sino-Soviet Rapprochement, 1985-1989. (Image, Soviet propaganda poster, "Friends Forever.")

Timeline

Popular Documents

October 2, 1959

Discussion between N.S. Khrushchev and Mao Zedong

Khrushchev and Mao discuss current political situations in Tibet, India, Indochina and Taiwan.

December 27, 1952

Telegram from Stalin to Mao Zedong

Stalin agrees to send ammunitions to Mao in preparation for a US attack.

November 18, 1957

Mao Zedong, 'Speech at a Meeting of the Representatives of Sixty-four Communist and Workers' Parties' (Edited by Mao)

During a speech at the Moscow Meeting of Communist and Workers' Parties of 1957 , Mao Zedong proclaims that "the east wind prevailing over the west wind." This version of the speech was edited by Mao for publication.

December 1959

Mao Zedong, Outline for a Speech on the International Situation

Draft of a speech by Mao Zedong, criticizing Khrushchev for his revisionism and for fearing Chinese Communism. Lists the occasions on which the Soviet Union has failed to support China, and extols the concept of continuous revolution.

October 2, 1958

Memorandum of Conversation of Mao Zedong with Six Delegates of the Socialist Countries, China, 2 October 1958

To the other delegates, Mao discusses their shared goal of defeating imperialism, primarily through peaceful methods. He stresses widespread Marxist reeducation of the Chinese people and increased Chinese industrial and agricultural production as means for improvement. Mao also reminds them that socialist nations must be firmly united under the leadership of the Soviet Union to fight colonialism and imperialism, and while the communes are necessary to organize locally, the party remains the core administrative unite of communized peoples.