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Photograph of Korean War armistice signing

Korean War Armistice

On July 27, 1953, the Korean Armistice Agreement was signed, ceasing hostilities and bringing an end to the Korean War. This collection contains Russian, Chinese, and Polish documents on the armistice negotiations which span the nearly two-year period of talks (July 1951-July 1953), shedding light on North Korean, Soviet, and Chinese strategic thinking toward the conflict and the armistice. For more coverage of the Korean War on the Digital Archive, see the collections: Korean War Origins, 1945-1950; Korean War, 1950-1953; China and the Korean War; and Korean War Biological Warfare Allegations.

Photograph of Korean War armistice signing

Popular Documents

June 6, 1953

Statement by President Syngman Rhee

President Syngman Rhee strongly opposed the peace talks between the United Nations, the North Korea People’s Army, and the Chinese People’s Volunteer Army. Rhee proposed that he would accept this armistice only if the United States signed a Mutual Defense Pact and to continue to build the ROK forces after the war.

August 3, 1953

Confidential Memorandum, Before Agreeing to the Armistice Agreement

When the United States agreed to a truce talk to end the Korea War, President Syngman Rhee disapproved. He opposed the truce and tried to attack these peace proceedings through a serious of events- such as releasing thousands of prisoners of war and creating turmoil for the US government. In order to persuade Rhee to accept the armistice defense, the US dispatches Assistant Secretary of State Walter Robertson to meet with the South Korean president in a series of bargaining discussions. Eventually, under certain conditions and a mutual defense pact with the US, Rhee agrees to the armistice.

September 16, 1952

Report, Zhou Enlai to the Chairman [Mao Zedong] and the Central Committee

Zhou Enlai updates Mao Zedong on the latest conversations with Stalin and other members of the Soviet leadership. Topics of discussion included Soviet technical assistance to China, developments in the Korean War, the United Nations, and the formation of a regional organization for Asia.

September 14, 1952

Report, Zhou Enlai to the Chairman [Mao Zedong]

Zhou and Stalin discuss the Korean War POW issue as well as the United Nations.

September 22, 1952

Report, Zhou Enlai to the Chairman [Mao Zedong] and the Central Committee

Zhou and Stalin discuss the POW issue, the United Nations and the formation of a new regional organization for Asia, and military cooperation.