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Soviet Foreign Policy

Documents on the international relations and foreign policy of the Soviet Union. See also United States-Soviet Relations and the Warsaw Pact. (Image, Nixon and Khrushchev in Moscow, 1959, NARA RG306-RMN-1-21)

Popular Documents

September 27, 1946

Telegram from Nikolai Novikov, Soviet Ambassador to the US, to the Soviet Leadership

Soviet Ambassador to the US, Nikolai Novikov, describes the advent of a more assertive US foreign policy. Novikov cautions the Soviet leadership that the Truman administration is bent on imposing US political, military and economic domination around the world. This telegram has, since its discovery in the Russian archives, been labelled the Soviet equivalent of US Ambassador to the Soviet Union George Kennan's "Long telegram."

February 19, 1954

Meeting of the Presidium of the Supreme Soviet of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics

Meeting minutes from Presidium of the USSR Supreme Soviet during which the transfer of Crimea from Russia to Ukraine was approved.

February 9, 1951

Record of a Conversation between Stalin and representatives of the Indian Communist Party

Meeting in Moscow between Stalin and Indian Communist Party representatives C. Rajeswara Rao, S. A. Dange, A. K. Ghosh, and [M. Basava] Punnaiah. Stalin responded to a series of prepared questions from the representatives.

February 5, 1954

Decree of the Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic Council of Ministers, 'Concerning the Transfer of the Crimean Oblast' from the RSFSR to the UkSSR'

Decree announcing the transfer of Crimea from the Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic to the Ukrainian Socialist Soviet Republic (here abbreviated USSR).

March 26, 1954

Molotov's Proposal that the USSR Join NATO, March 1954

In this memorandum to the Soviet Presidium, Foreign Minister Molotov proposes that the Soviet Union publicly state its willingness to consider joining NATO. He explains that the proposal is intended to disrupt the formation of the European Defense Community and the rearmament of West Germany, and also limit the United State's influence in Europe.