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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • May 01, 1975

    Hungarian Embassy in the DPRK, Report, 1 May 1975. Subject: Visit of a Laotian delegation in the DPRK.

    The Hungarian Embassy in the DPRK provides an overview of relations between Pyongyang and Vientiane and summarizes a recent visit of a Lao delegation to North Korea.

  • February 18, 1976

    Report, Embassy of Hungary in North Korea to the Hungarian Foreign Ministry

    A member of the Polish Embassy reports information on DPRK military expenditures, manpower, and desire to construct a nuclear reactor.

  • April 15, 1976

    Report, Embassy of Hungary in North Korea to the Hungarian Foreign Ministry

    Report on Soviet-Korean economic negotiations. The DPRK makes a request for a nuclear power plant, which the Soviet Union declines. The Korean delegation is overly aggressive and crude to the Soviets.

  • June 25, 1976

    Telegram, Embassy of Hungary in North Korea to the Hungarian Foreign Ministry

    Soviet-Korean relations deteriorate, as Korea falls behind in commercial deliveries and the Soviet Union declines to deliver a nuclear power plant.

  • November 21, 1977

    Report, Embassy of Hungary in North Korea to the Hungarian Foreign Ministry

    Soviet-DPRK delegations meet, but agree to not discuss North Korea's economic problems repaying the Soviet Union, or the Soviet Union's refusal to supply a nuclear power plant to North Korea.

  • January 18, 1978

    Hungarian Embassy in the DPRK, Telegram, 18 January 1978. Subject: Invitation to Zia ul-Haq to visit the DPRK.

    Pakistan denies Kim Il Sung's invitation for Zia ul-Haq to visit Pyongyang and explains that domestic developments will prevent ul-Haq from traveling abroad.

  • February 17, 1979

    Telegram, Embassy of Hungary in North Korea to the Hungarian Foreign Ministry

    The DPRK asks Czechoslvakia to construct a nuclear power plant, and also for uranium-mining equipment.

  • February 23, 1979

    Report, Embassy of Hungary in North Korea to the Hungarian Foreign Ministry

    The Hungarian Ambassador in North Korea reports on the construction of the Kori Nuclear Power Plant in South Korea, highlighting that South Korea's projected power output would eventually surpass North Korea's by three-fold. As a result, North Korea was anxious to build its own nuclear power plant and perhaps even an atomic bomb.

  • May 22, 1979

    Report, Embassy of Hungary in North Korea to the Hungarian Foreign Ministry

    The Hungarian Embassy in North Korea reports on South Korea's nuclear capabilities and technology, as reported by the Washington Post.

  • October 31, 1980

    Telegram from Szabó Ferenc, 'Report to the Political Bureau on the Korean Workers’ Party’s 6th Congress and on the celebrations of the 35th anniversary of the foundation of the KWP'

    Note on the attachment of the report of the Hungarian party delegation about the Korean Workers’ Party’s 6th Congress that they have prepared for the Political Bureau.

  • November 05, 1980

    Telegram from Szabó Ferenc, 'Information from the Korean charge d’affaires on their ten-point proposal for reunification'

    Information sent by DPRK charge d’affaires on ten-point proposal for reunification and the Hungarian response on the proposal

  • November 18, 1980

    Telegram from Szabó Ferenc, 'Information from the Korean charge d’affaires on their ten-point proposal for reunification'

    Information from DPRK charge d’affaires on ten-point proposal for reunification, on two-governments-one-nation system, with Hungarian response

  • December 09, 1980

    Record for the Vice Minister Comrade Dr. Házi Vencel about the consultations with Comrade O Man-seok, the Head of Department of the DPRK’s Foreign Affairs Ministry

    O Man-seok's brief of DPRK internal policies activities to move forward the cause of unifying Korea.

  • February 16, 1981

    Hungarian Foreign Ministry, 4th Main Department, Memorandum, 16 February 1981. Subject: Establishment of a Social Democratic Party in the DPRK.

    The Hungarian Foreign Ministry reports that the Korean Democratic Party has changed names and become known as the Korean Social Democratic Party.

  • April 06, 1983

    Letter, Hungarian Foreign Ministry to the Hungarian Academy of Sciences

    Hungary politely defers North Korea's request for training on a nuclear power plant to the Soviets.

  • May 30, 1983

    Memorandum, Hungarian Foreign Ministry

    A conversation with Pang Yong-kab and Ho Kwang-ho on the Sino-Korean relationships following the hijacking of a Chinese airplane