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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • March 20, 1942

    Concerning Signing of an Agreement with the Government of Xinjiang about the Operation of the Dushanzi Refinery

    The Politburo approves the establishment of a mixed Soviet-Xinjiang company to operate the Dushanzi Refinery and outlines the company's management and funding structure.

  • January 31, 1949

    Notes by Anastas Mikoyan ahead of Meetings with Mao Zedong

    Notes taken by Minister of Foreign Trade Anastas Mikoyan during a meeting with Mao Zedong in Beijing. They discuss relations with the United States and other Western powers and the nationalization of foreign-owned factories in China. Mikoyan also gave advice on developing the new Communist government in China. Noteably, Mikoyan wrote that "the path of the regime of the people’s democracies, or the path of the Russian Soviet revolution, is not quite appropriate for China. China has its own path of development."

  • February 06, 1949

    Memorandum of Conversation between Anastas Mikoyan and Mao Zedong

    Anastas Mikoyan and Mao Zedong discuss Outer Mongolia, the Sino-Soviet treaty, the situation of the national minorities in China, the economic policy of the CCP, the structure of state power, the head of the Chinese government, the "new situation" and the cadres, the Soviet loan to China, the CCP CC plans for February-March, and the youth movement.

  • August 28, 1952

    Cable, Zhou Enlai to Chairman Mao [Zedong] and the Central Committee

    Zhou reports on the latest negotiations with the Soviet Union concerning the Changchun Railway, the Lüshun Port, and a rubber agreement. Zhou and Molotov also discussed the possibility of signing peace treaties with Japan.

  • September 03, 1952

    Minutes of Conversation between I.V. Stalin and Zhou Enlai

    Conversation between Stalin and Zhou Enlai on the Chinese Five-Year Plan, the Ulan-Bator-Pinditsiuan railroad, and arms sales/production. They also discussed the Korean war, Burma, and Tibet.

  • October 22, 1954

    Abstract of Talk between Nehru, Chen Yun, and Vice Premier Li Fuchun

    Record of conversation between Indian and Chinese delegations, on a wide variety of issues in China. Conversation covers the structure of Chinese government, management of the bureaucracy, handling of finances, and plans for improving education and productivity levels.

  • April 25, 1956

    Talk by Mao Zedong at an Enlarged Meeting of the Chinese Communist Party Central Committee Politburo (Excerpts)

    Mao speaks to the Central Committee Politburo about the need to develop an atomic bomb to avoid being "bullied," but stresses that this can only happen if economic development increases simultaneously.

  • October 23, 1957

    Journal of Soviet Ambassador to the DPRK A.M. Puzanov for 23 October 1957

    Qiao Xiaoguang relays the results of the trip to China by the unofficial Korean delegation headed by Kim Il, where the draft of the first DPRK five-year plan and issues of the commodity exchange between the PRC and DPRK were discussed.

  • September 21, 1959

    Report by Qiao Xiaoguang on a Conversation with Kim Il Sung

    Qiao Xiaoguang, the Chinese Ambassador to North Korea, reports to the Central Committee that Kim Il Sung expressed the desire to discuss North Korea's economic development with Mao Zedong and Liu Shaoqi. Kim also states his support for the CCP and the solidarity of the China-DPRK relationship.

  • January 30, 1963

    Cable from the Chinese Foreign Trade Ministry

    The Chinese Ministry of Foreign Trade sends a report on trade negotiations with North Vietnam and North Korea.

  • January 30, 1963

    Summary of Trade Negotiations with Korea and Vietnam for 1963

    A Chinese report regarding its successful conclusion and prompt signing of two trade agreements with North Korea and Vietnam in 1963.

  • March 08, 1964

    Record of Premier Zhou Enlai's Conversations with the President of Ghana Kwame Nkrumah

    Over the course of three conversations, Zhou and Nkrumah discuss African regionalism, China's position at the United Nations and its relations with the United States, non-alignment, decolonization, developments in the Congo, and an African nuclear-weapons-free zone.

  • May 07, 1964

    Report on a Meeting between Enver Hoxha and Li Byeongchan

    Enver Hoxha exchanges greetings with the delegation from the DPRK and discusses the strides that both countries have made in agriculture. They criticize the foreign and domestic policies of Khrushchev, which resulted in concessions to the West and decreased agricultural productivity. Both sides congratulate one another for standing up to Soviet "revisionism" and talk about the positive exchanges and cooperation with China.

  • August 19, 1964

    Report on How China's Economic Construction Should Prepare Itself Against an Enemy Surprise Attack

    China’s economic preparations against an enemy attack.

  • December 10, 1965

    Minutes of Conversation between Vice Premier Ri Ju-yeon and Deputy Minister Li Qiang from the Banquet on the 10th

    Ri Ju-yeon questions Li Qiang about the presence of Chinese companies in Hong Kong as well as the establishment of Banks of China in Singapore and elsewhere.

  • January 09, 1966

    Secret Letter from the Indian Embassy in Beijing to the Foreign Secretary in New Delhi, No. PEK/104/66, 'China and the West'

    The Indian Embassy in Beijing sent a letter to the Indian Foreign Secretary to prove an analysis of Chinese foreign policy, such as Beijing's relationship with the West and the impact of Sino-Soviet split on Chinese foreign relations.

  • March, 1974

    East German Report on Seventh Interkit Meeting in Budapest, March 1974

    This report, issued after the seventh Interkit meeting in Budapest, addresses unsolved socio-economic problems and internal party disputes in China. The new military strategy of the People's Republic as well as its economic development are examined. Beijing's foreign relations with Western countries, especially with the US, are considered to be detrimental to international détente. The attendees condemn China for stockpiling nuclear weapons and missiles in preparation for a military confrontation with the Soviet Union, for extending its influence in developing countries, for strengthening the position of NATO, for interfering with the domestic policies of Vietnam, and for supporting the military junta in Chile.

  • June, 1975

    East German Report on the Eight Interkit Meeting in Ulaanbaatar, June 1975

    This report, issued after the eighth Interkit meeting in Ulaanbaatar, addresses the domestic and foreign policies of China and the anti-Maoist propaganda measures to be undertaken by Socialist countries. There are no great expectations for a collapse of Maoism, even though the Chinese economy is developing slowly. China is acquiring nuclear weapons and missiles in preparation for an armed conflict. Beijing's foreign relations with Western countries are considered to be detrimental to international détente and directed against the interests of the Soviet Union and the Socialist countries.

  • June, 1977

    East German Report, 'China after Mao Zedong'

    This study gives an account on the domestic and foreign policies of China after the death of Mao Zedong. The first part of the document is dedicated to the domestic policies of the Chinese government. It analyzes the ideological backgrounds of the new leadership as well as the economic situation, while emphasizing unsolved problems in industry and agriculture. A closer look at Beijing's defense spending leads the authors to the conclusion that China is enhancing its military potential and preparing for war.

  • November 10, 1980

    Hungarian Report on 'Economic Interkit' Meeting in Bulgaria, October 1980

    Reports on a meeting that took place in Bulgaria regarding cooperative measures to be taken in regards to the People’s Republic of China. It notes that China has reduced the number of items it seeks to import, and is hinting that it will continue to do so in the future, as well. The Soviets, however, would like to keep trade and even technological and scientific informational trade at the same level that it is at now.