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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • July 27, 1951

    From the Diary of N. V. Roshchin: Memorandum of Conversation with Chinese Premier Zhou Enlai on 24 July 1951

    Discussion between Soviet Ambassador to the PRC Roshchin and Zhou Enlai regarding the conflict in Korea. Zhou states that the war effort is a drain on China's domestic economy, but that it will bounce back once the war is won. Also describes Chinese relations with capitalist countries. Notes that the CCP lacks technical specialists of any sort.

  • May 29, 1965

    Cable from the Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'Reactions to China's Second Nuclear Test'

    Cable from the Chinese Foreign Ministry to Chinese Embassies noting foreign countries' responses to China's second nuclear test.

  • January 09, 1966

    Secret Letter from the Indian Embassy in Beijing to the Foreign Secretary in New Delhi, No. PEK/104/66, 'China and the West'

    The Indian Embassy in Beijing sent a letter to the Indian Foreign Secretary to prove an analysis of Chinese foreign policy, such as Beijing's relationship with the West and the impact of Sino-Soviet split on Chinese foreign relations.

  • March, 1970

    Report on the China Problem Following the 9th Party Congress of the Chinese Communist Party

    This study addresses aspects of Chinese domestic and foreign policies after the 9th Congress of the Chinese Communist Party. Internal party disputes and undemocratic structures are said to characterize the Chinese leadership. The document offers an analysis of the socio-political state of affairs in China and states that the delay in economic growth is due to violations of the economic principles of Socialism. As far as its foreign policy is concerned, China is strengthening its military potential; Beijing's intensified relations with Western countries are condemned.

  • July, 1972

    Information from Consultative Meeting about China July 3-5, 1972 on International Policy and Internal Situation of the People’s Republic of China (PRC) under Current Conditions

    A lengthy document that addresses several issues related to Communism and China. It covers such topics as Chinese foreign policy, Chinese and American relations, Maoism, Chinese policy regarding developing countries, capitalist countries and other socialist countries.

  • July 03, 1972

    East German Report on the Fifth Interkit Meeting in Prague, July 1972

    This East German report, issued after the Interkit meeting in Prague, addresses the domestic and foreign policies of China. It makes reference to internal conflicts destabilizing the Chinese leadership. China is said to be enhancing its military potential, especially in the area of missiles and nuclear weapons. Its aims in foreign policy are to acquire a leadership position in the so-called "Third World", to expand its relations with capitalist countries, to damage the unity of the Socialist bloc, and to obstruct the foreign relations of the Soviet Union. Considering the increase of influence of China on North Korea, Romania, and Vietnam, as well as on the Communist parties in Spain and Italy, the Socialist countries must improve their anti-Maoist propaganda efforts.

  • October 12, 1972

    Department Head van Well to Foreign Office, 'China Visit by the Foreign Minister'

    Report on a West German Foreign Ministry delegation to China lead by Walter Scheel exploring the possibility of opening diplomatic relations. In meetings with Chinese Foreign Minister Ji Pengfei they discuss detente, Chinese mistrust of the Soviet Union, and the CSCE.

  • May 21, 1973

    Sixth Interkit Meeting, Record of Meeting with Boris Ponomarev and Konstantin Katushev

    This record of a meeting with the secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union (CPSU), Boris Ponomarev, and with the secretary of the Central Committee of the CPSU, Konstantin Katushev, addresses the anti-Soviet course adopted by Beijing. The discussion specifically refers to relations between China and the Communist parties of Albania, Romania, Australia, France, Italy, and New Zealand. The document also assesses the situation in Anwar el-Sadat's Egypt, in Hafez al-Assad's Syria, in Iraq, and in Yemen, the main idea being that the Socialist countries should support the development of progressive Arabic states.

  • May 21, 1973

    Sixth Interkit Meeting, Record of Meetings with Oleg Rakhmanin and Konstantin Katushev

    These are the records of two meetings on the occasion of the Sixth Interkit Meeting. The first of these involves a member of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union (CPSU), Oleg Rakhmanin, while the second is a meeting with the secretary of the Central Committee of the CPSU, Konstantin Katushev. Both address relations between China and the Soviet Union. The documents discuss the Sino-Soviet border clashes, the Soviet security policy in the Far East and Siberia, and the position of countries such as Yugoslavia, Romania, and Albania, as well as the critical situation in Vietnam and Cambodia.

  • July 09, 1973

    Report by the Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union on China's Policy toward Western Europe and Opposition against the CSCE

    This document contains information prepared by the Central Committee (CC) of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union (CPSU) on China's European policy and Chinese opposition to the convocation of a Conference on Security and Cooperation in Europe (CSCE). It states that China's overall goals are diametrically opposed to those of the European Socialist countries and their Communist parties, with Beijing identifying the Soviet Union as its primary enemy. In this light, the Soviet leadership maintains that actively confronting China in ideological and political terms remains one of the most important tasks of the Warsaw Pact countries.

  • March, 1974

    East German Report on Seventh Interkit Meeting in Budapest, March 1974

    This report, issued after the seventh Interkit meeting in Budapest, addresses unsolved socio-economic problems and internal party disputes in China. The new military strategy of the People's Republic as well as its economic development are examined. Beijing's foreign relations with Western countries, especially with the US, are considered to be detrimental to international détente. The attendees condemn China for stockpiling nuclear weapons and missiles in preparation for a military confrontation with the Soviet Union, for extending its influence in developing countries, for strengthening the position of NATO, for interfering with the domestic policies of Vietnam, and for supporting the military junta in Chile.

  • June, 1975

    China after the 10th Party Congress and the Adoption of the Maoist Constitution

    This study analyzes China's domestic and foreign policies after the 10th Congress of the Chinese Communist Party. It addresses the propaganda measures of the Maoist regime and the socio-economic development in China. The report also discusses the undemocratic character of the Chinese Constitution of 1975. Regarding its foreign relations, China is said to be extending its area of influence in developing countries and developing closer relations with Western countries. Chinese-US relations are criticized, as well as China's permissiveness in allowing more Western influences to affect its domestic policies and economic strategies.

  • June, 1975

    East German Report on the Eight Interkit Meeting in Ulaanbaatar, June 1975

    This report, issued after the eighth Interkit meeting in Ulaanbaatar, addresses the domestic and foreign policies of China and the anti-Maoist propaganda measures to be undertaken by Socialist countries. There are no great expectations for a collapse of Maoism, even though the Chinese economy is developing slowly. China is acquiring nuclear weapons and missiles in preparation for an armed conflict. Beijing's foreign relations with Western countries are considered to be detrimental to international détente and directed against the interests of the Soviet Union and the Socialist countries.

  • June 19, 1975

    Cable from Ambassador Pauls to the Foreign Office, 'German-Chinese Relations'

    A cable from Ambassador Pauls about a conversation with Chinese Foreign Minister Qiao Guanhua about developments in Europe and the Chinese assessment of the global situation after the end of the Vietnam War.

  • December 02, 1975

    Memorandum of Conversation between Mao Zedong and Gerald R. Ford

    President Ford and Secretary Kissinger met with Chairman Mao and spoke about Chinese-U.S. relations, Japanese-U.S. relations, Chinese foreign relations with Japan and Western countries, NATO, the Sinai Agreement, and Soviet attempts to expand influence in Africa.

  • 1976

    Analysis of China's Foreign Policy by the Czechoslovak Embassy in Beijing

    This document examines Chinese attempts to foster Western European integration as a counterbalance to the US. Also discussed is the relationship between NATO countries and China and its impact on Soviet-Sino relations, military cooperation between China and Western Europe, and the relations between China and West Germany.

  • November 29, 1976

    Cable from Ambassador Wickert to the Foreign Office, 'Benefits of Relationship with China for the Alliance'

    West German Ambassador Wickert reports to the Foreign Office about Chinese foreign policy following Mao Zedong's death.

  • June, 1977

    East German Report on the Ninth Interkit Meeting in Berlin, June 1977

    This report was issued after the ninth Interkit meeting in East Berlin, which featured an official Cuban delegation. The document addresses the Chinese question after the death of Mao Zedong. According to this report, the internal disputes inside the Chinese Communist Party persist under the leadership of Deng Xiaoping. The economic problems that China faces are still unresolved. In its foreign relations, China is staying the course by maintaining relations with Western countries, especially with the US. These relations are considered to be detrimental to international détente and directed against the interests of the Soviet Union and the Socialist countries.

  • August 06, 1977

    Notes on a Meeting held in the Great Hall of the People in Peking on Saturday 6 August 1977

    Hua Guofeng and Kurt Waldheim discuss China's domestic policies and foreign policies.

  • December, 1978

    East German Report on the Tenth Interkit Meeting in Havana, December 1978

    This report, issued after the tenth Interkit meeting in Havana, addresses China's domestic and foreign policies. China is said to be obstructing the process of international détente by developing relations with NATO and West Germany. The report condemns the Chinese interference in Romanian, Yugoslavian and Korean politics. The authors believe that China is trying to divide the Socialist countries into two opposing groups. The newly intensified Chinese-US relations are criticized, as is China's policy of allowing more Western influence to shape its domestic policies and economic strategies.