Search in
ADD SEARCH FILTER CANCEL SEARCH FILTER

Digital Archive International History Declassified

SEARCH RESULTS

  • October 20, 1947

    Ciphered Telegram, Molotov to Cde. Stalin

    Molotov relates how the Americans have rejected the Soviet position toward establishing a temporary all Korean assembly. While there is some overlap between both positions, this issue has now been exacerbated by Marshall's move to decide it in the UNGA. The Soviets should respond to this move by reiterating their commitment to a self-determined form of government for Korea, which requires the Soviets and Americans to withdraw their troops.

  • September 20, 1947

    Report of Pham No Mach [Pham Ngoc Thach] to the Soviet Envoy in Switzerland, A. G. Kulazhenkov

    Report of a meeting with an emissary of the Viet Minh government who requested Soviet support for Vietnamese forces in their independence war against the French. Pham Ngoc Thach stresses the communist nature of the Republic of Vietnam's government, explaining that the Communist Party was only dissolved in 1945 "to avoid provoking a negative American reaction." Pham also discusses his meetings with the French Communist Party in Paris, and the situation in other Southeast Asian countries, including Malay, Indonesia and Thailand.

  • October 23, 1947

    Draft of Telegram to Vyshinsky on the Korean Question

    Vyshinsky is instructed that, because the Korean issue is already on the UNSC agenda, it should remain there. Vyshinsky should stake out a position that both American and Soviet troops withdraw simultaneously, allowing the Koreans to develop a unified government. Elected representatives from both Koreas should be invited to discussions. A time span for the troop withdrawals must be set. The draft includes some scrawled recommendations from Stalin.

  • October 29, 1947

    Telegram No. 293, V. Molotov to Cde. Stalin

    Molotov writes that Vyshinsky must insist on the Koreans being invited to any discussion on removing foreign troops from Korea. If opposition to such participation holds, the Soviets should abstain from voting on the matter out of principle.

  • October 29, 1947

    Telegram No. 418 from Vyshinsky

    Vyshinsky outlines the amendment that the US has introduced regarding the Korean question. Moreover, Vyshinsky asserts the plan to object to the amendment and express why the amendment is not compatible with the proposal of the Soviets.

  • October 29, 1947

    Telegram No. 423, Vyshinsky to Cde. Molotov

    Vyshinsky clarifies that in case there is a decision to form a commission in Korea, it is not advisable for the US and the Soviets to take part. Vyshinsky requests for an answer on this issue.

  • October 29, 1947

    Telegram, V. Molotov to Cde. Stalin

    V. Molotov states the importance that the Korean issue should be discussed with the Koreans. He also details that in the case of opposing proposals from the US, the Soviets should oppose and abstain rather than voting against them.

  • October 29, 1947

    Telegram Nos. 408-411, Vyshinsky to Molotov

    Vyshinsky outlines the proceedings at the UN, where discussion of the Korean question and the withdrawal of Foreign troops from Korea has led the Soviets to insist that the Koreans be invited to the discussions. He details counter proposals from the Americans, and Soviet responses to these resolutions.

  • October 30, 1947

    Telegram, V. Molotov to Cde. Stalin

    V. Molotov states the importance that the Korean issue should be discussed with the Koreans. He also details that in the case the amendments are approved, the Soviet Union will not take part in the work of the US proposed committee. He also details that in the case the amendments are approved, the Soviet Union will not take part in the work of the US proposed committee.

  • December 18, 1947

    Central Intelligence Agency, ORE-62, 'Implementation of Soviet Objectives in Korea'

    The CIA analyzes Soviet policy in northern Korea, claiming that it seeks to create a satellite state.

  • December 16, 1947

    Cable, Stalin [Kuznetsov] to Mao Zedong [via Terebin]

    Stalin, using the name of Fyodor Kuznetsov, Chief of the GRU, officially invites Mao Zedong to Moscow. Stalin does so through Andrei Orlov, acting under the name "Terebin."

  • December 17, 1947

    Cable, Terebin to Stalin [via Kuznetsov]

    Terebin (Andrei Orlov) returns Kuznetsov's (Stalin) cable concerning a visit to Moscow by Mao. Terebin gives Mao's response to the invitation and tells of a discussion that took place between himself and Mao after Stalin's message was relayed.

  • February 10, 1948

    Report of Milovan Djilas about a Secret Soviet-Bulgarian-Yugoslav Meeting

    Stalin calls a secret meeting with Soviet, Bulgarian, and Yugoslav officials regarding discrepancies and a general lack of coordination between the three governments in several recent incidences.

  • February 17, 1948

    Record of Conversation between I.V. Stalin and President of Hungary Zoltán Tildy in Moscow

    Stalin and Hungarian President Zoltán Tildy discuss the draft of the treaty of friendship, cooperation and mutual assistance between Hungary and the Soviet Union. They also discuss Hungarian relations with its neighbors, Romania and Czechoslovakia, and the internal situation in Hungary.

  • March 14, 1948

    Stenographic Record of a Speech by Comrade J. V. Stalin at a Special Session of the Politburo, March 14, 1948

    Speech by Stalin to a special session of the Politburo. He argues that because of differing ideologies between the USSR and the United States, hostilities are inevitable and, for that reason, the country's military should be enlarged. He praises the example set by the Chinese communist movement, and notes that India should be where the Soviet Union directs its attention to next. Brian Murray questions the validity of the document in CWIHP Working Paper No. 12, where the document was first published.

  • April 12, 1948

    Protocol No. 61 of a Meeting of the Special Committee under the Council of Ministers of the USSR (Excerpt)

    Memorandum of the Special Committee of the CC CPSU postponing the geological prospecting for uranium in North Korea.

  • April 20, 1948

    Cable, Stalin [Kuznetsov] to Mao Zedong [via Terebin]

    Stalin responds to two letters from Mao, via Terebin (Andrei Orlov). In the cable, Stalin gives advice to Mao on what to do with opposing parties once the Chinese revolution is complete and whether or not Mao should include the liberal bourgeosie in China's central government.

  • April 22, 1948

    Cable, Terebin to Stalin, Plans for Mao's Visit to Moscow

    Terebin (Andrei Orlov) tells Stalin of Mao's plans for arriving in Moscow and asks whether he, Terebin, should join Mao on the journey.

  • May 22, 1948

    Comments and a Conclusion on the Draft Provisional Constitution of the Korean People's Democratic Republic

    Comments and discussion on several articles of a draft constitution for the Democratic People's Republic of Korea.

  • April 22, 1948

    Resolution on Yugoslavia of the Political Bureau of the Central Committee of the Romanian Workers' Party

    Resolution condemning recent anti-Soviet rhetoric in Yugoslavia.