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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • February 01, 1955

    Report from the Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'Existence of Diplomatic Relations Between Afro-Asian Conference Participant Countries and the Jiang Bandits'

    The note details whether the participating countries in the Asian-African Conference have diplomatic relations with Taiwan.

  • March, 1955

    Leter from China's Vice Foreign Minister to the Afro-Asian Secretary-General Ruslan Abdulgani

    Chinese Vice Foreign Minister informed Afro-Asian Secretary General that China did not have any suggestion for the Conference agenda

  • March 27, 1955

    Report from the Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'Compilation of the Excerpts of the Telegrams Concerning the Asian-African Conference'

    The collection of telegrams covers the procedure and agenda about the Asian-African Conference, the arguments about China’s participation in the Conference, the attempts of the US and the UK to influence the Conference, and the attitudes of various countries toward the Conference.

  • March 31, 1955

    Draft of the Formation of the Delegation for Participating in the Asian-African Conference

    A draft list of Chinese delegates to participate in the Bandung Conference.

  • April 01, 1955

    Report from the Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'The Asian-African Conference'

    The note covers the background, achievements, and influence of the Asian-African Conference. It states that the Conference was initiated because Asian and African countries gained their independence after the Second World War and wanted to tackle the imperialism and colonialism. After the Conference, there was an increase of anti-imperialism sentiment among the Asian and African countries.

  • April 04, 1955

    Report from the Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'Draft Plan for Attending the Asian-African Conference'

    The participants in the Asian-African Conference had the common interest in pursuing international peace and national economic and cultural development. China should take the advantage of this Conference to promote national independence movement and to establish stronger relations with Asian and African countries. According to this goal, the plan listed the common issues that all participants faced, the issues that existed between China and other countries, and the issues that China alone was facing. It also spelled out the relations of China and different groups of counties in the Conference, as well as the logistic issues.

  • April 09, 1955

    Cable from the Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'Beware of Enemy Sabotage'

    Chinese report on a Taiwanese plan to assassinate the head of the PRC delegation to the Afro-Asian Conference when they passed through Hong Kong.

  • April 11, 1955

    Report from the Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'Attitudes of Various Countries towards the Asian-African Conference on the Eve of the Conference'

    The Chinese Foreign Ministry examines the attitude of several parties to the Asian-African Conference, including India, Egypt, Thailand, the Philippines, and Japan.

  • April 30, 1955

    Cable from the Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'Prepare to Send Kang Maozhao and Zhang Weileng to Indonesia'

    The Chinese Foreign Ministry wants additional Chinese journalists to participate in the Bandung Conference.

  • May 11, 1955

    Report from the Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'Several Distorted Views on the Asian-African Conference'

    A Chinese report on interpretations of the Asian-African Conference around the world that they found "distorted", including topics like colonialism, collective self-defense, views on the UN, the ten principles of peace and cooperation, and mutual cooperation in the development of Asia and Africa.

  • May 23, 1955

    Cable from the Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'Evaluation of the Asian-African Conference on Indonesian Radio'

    A Chinese speech highlights the Bandung Conference's contribution to world peace.

  • May 27, 1955

    Summary of the Views of Afro-Asian Countries on the Taiwan Issue at the Afro-Asian Conference

    The People's Republic of China maintains that the Taiwan issue was an internal issue of China, and it was the US who created tension by invading and occupying Taiwan.

  • July 12, 1955

    Cable from the Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'Draft Proposal to Strengthen and Develop Friendly Relations with Asian-African Countries after the Asian-African Conference'

    The PRC Foreign Ministry proposes to develop relations with, strengthen propaganda work toward, and expand the study of countries in Asia and Afica.

  • July 18, 1955

    Cable from the Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'Sending the Plan for the Sino-American Talks'

    The Chinese Foreign Ministry sends instructions for the Sino-American ambassadorial talks.

  • July 18, 1955

    Plan for the Sino-US Ambassadorial Talks in Geneva

    The Chinese Foreign Ministry outlines objectives and strategies for negotiating with the United States.

  • July 26, 1955

    Additional Instructions Regarding the Sino-American Ambassadorial Talks at Geneva

    The Chinese Foreign Ministry offers some additional instructions for how to approach the talks with the United States.

  • July 30, 1955

    Cable from the Chinese Foreign Ministry, 'Please Postpone the Ambassadorial-level Talks to the Afternoon on the 1st of August'

    The Chinese Foreign Ministry asked their negotiators to try to postpone the first meeting of the Sino-American talks so that the Ministry could send them instructions and the text of speech

  • July 30, 1955

    Instructions on the Sino-American Ambassadorial Level Talks at Geneva (Excerpt)

    Instructions from the PRC Foreign Ministry to its negotiators at the Sino-American talks. These instructions concerned the PRC's basic policy, their attitude toward the question of expatriates, the US embargo against China, possible higher level Sino-American talks. Possible issues that could be raised by the US were also mentioned: The matter of US assets in China, the issue of shooting down commercial airliners, and the issue of cease-fire across the Taiwan Strait. Besides, the Foreign Ministry gave instructions on the attitude to adopt at the meetings as well as the need to constantly ask for instructions.

  • July 31, 1955

    Cable from the Foreign Ministry to Comrade Wang Bingnan, 'On the Text of Speech, Instructions, and Points of Attention at the Sino-American Talks'

    Several instructions from the PRC Foreign Ministry on how to handle the negotiations as well as two attachments regarding the text of speech for the first meeting of the Sino-American talks and the issue of news release during the talks

  • August 03, 1955

    Cable from the Chinese Foreign Ministry to Wang Bingnan, 'Instructions for the Third Meeting of the Sino-US Ambassadorial Talks'

    The Chinese Foreign Ministry suspected that China’s release of 11 American spies had put pressure on the US side, making the US open to the idea of having a higher level meeting. The Foreign Ministry instructed the Chinese representatives to urge the US to promise to release Chinese students in the US in the next meeting, and also urge the US to accept the suggestion of bringing in third country (India) to help the release process, including financial support.