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Digital Archive International History Declassified

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  • August 23, 1944

    Federal Bureau of Investigation Report on Activities of Mikhail Konstantin Kalatozov

    Soviet film director Mikhail Kalatozov has left Los Angeles for New York and Washington, DC, and will likely be returning home to the Soviet Union. A list of contacts by Kalatozov's staff and his wife to various American film producers and directors is recorded, including Orson Welles.

  • September 11, 1944

    Memorandum for J. Edgar Hoover on Proposed Organization for Exchange of American and Soviet Films

    A heavily redacted memorandum on a report from the Assistant Attorney General regarding a proposed organization to exchange Soviet and American films, which would involve film director Mikhail Kalatozov.

  • September 30, 1944

    Letter No. 340 from L.D. Wilgress, Canadian Embassy, Moscow, to the Secretary of State for External Affairs, W.L. Mackenzie King

  • October 09, 1944

    Record of Meeting at the Kremlin, Moscow, 9 October 1944, at 10 p.m.

    Churchill, Eden, Stalin, and Molotov discuss the leadership in Poland, Britains interests in Greece and Hong Kong, the actions of Romania and Bulgaria during the war, Turkey, the need for the Great Powers to exert influence on the Balkans to prevent small wars, the leadership of Italy, interests in Bulgaria and Romania, the dividing of Germany and Germany's future, and the American plans in the war against Japan.

  • October 23, 1944

    Federal Bureau of Investigation Report on Activities of Mikhail Konstantin Kalatozov

    Report on the conclusion of Soviet film director Mikhail Kalatozov's trip to the United States and various negotiations with American film companies.

  • November 09, 1944

    Letter No. 402 from L.D. Wilgress, Canadian Embassy, Moscow, to the Secretary of State for External Affairs, W.L. Mackenzie King

    The Canadian Ambassador to the Soviet Union, L.D. Wilgress, thoroughly reviews Soviet foreign policy in Europe, Asia, and in Latin America and its relations with the United States and the United Kingdom. Wilgress optimistically concludes that "the Soviet Government are desirous of co-operating fully with the other great powers."

  • November 24, 1944

    Federal Bureau of Investigation Teletype on Conclusion of Surveillance of Mikhail Kalatozov

    Notice of the continued microphone surveillance following the departure of Soviet film director Mikhail Kalatozov for the Soviet Union.

  • November 28, 1944

    Memorandum from J. Edgar Hoover to United States Attorney General

    FBI director Hoover recommends continued surveillance of Mikhail Kalatozov's former residence in Los Angeles.

  • November 29, 1944

    Federal Bureau of Investigation Report on Activities of Mikhail Konstantin Kalatozov

    Report on Soviet film director Kalatozov's activities in New York City and contacts with members of the American film industry.

  • December 20, 1944

    Federal Bureau of Investigation Report on Activities of Mikhail Konstantin Kalatozov

    Soviet film director Mikhail Kalatozov has departed from the United States but is expected to return in 1945. Final report on his activities and contacts prior to departure.

  • February 09, 1945

    Letter from Special Agent in Charge R. B. Hood to FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover

    RKO Pictures Incorporated requested that the Department of Justice inform then whether a proposed organization for the exchange of American and Soviet films would be required to register under the Foreign Agents Registration Act.

  • February 11, 1945

    Yalta Conference Agreement, Declaration of a Liberated Europe

    The text of the agreements reached at the Yalta (Crimea) Conference between President Roosevelt, Prime Minister Churchill and Generalissimo Stalin.

  • April 24, 1945

    Letter from Special Agent in Charge E. E. Conroy to FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover

    Further investigation into a proposed organization for the exchange of Soviet and American films is not considered necessary.

  • July 20, 1945

    Summary of Activities of the Liaison Officers to the American Military Mission

    Major Prager summarizes information from Romanian liaison officers and interpreters working with the American Military Mission between April 1 and June 30, 1945.

  • August 23, 1945

    Cable from Vyacheslav Molotov to Soviet Ambassador in the United States

    Drafted response from Stalin to Truman regarding Hokkaido and Kurile Islands.

  • August 29, 1945

    Cable from Kuz’ma Derevyanko to Aleksei Antonov

    Report concerning the division of occupied territory in the Pacific between the Soviet Union and the United States.

  • October 09, 1945

    TASS News Summary

    Stories include disputes in the US about putting the atomic bomb under international supervision, a speech by Truman on the atomic bomb, British conservative party politics, the dissolution of the national assembly in Portugal, elections in Budapest, and a speech by British Foreign Secretary Bevin on the conference of ministers of foreign affairs.

  • February 22, 1946

    George Kennan's 'Long Telegram'

    Ambassador George F. Kennan writes to the Secretary of State with a lengthy analysis of Soviet policy in an attempt to explain their recent uncooperative behavior. This message would later become famous as the "long telegram."

  • March 05, 1946

    Churchhill's "Iron Curtain" Speech, "Sinews of Peace"

    Text of speech given by Churchill at Westminster College in Fulton, Missouri in which he first used the phrase "iron curtain."

  • May 06, 1946

    From the Diary of V.M. Molotov, Reception of the Chinese Ambassador to France, Jing Tai, on 6 May 1946 at 3:00 p.m. in the Soviet Embassy in Paris

    The conversation is concerning the "German question" in terms of the conditions and aftermath of the surrender. PR China sees the negotiation on Germany as becoming an agreement that might apply similar to the question on the Japanese surrender. For this reason Jing Tai asks Molotov to allow China to take part in the negotiations on Germany. The trials of Japanese war criminals were also discussed.