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  • November 01, 1962

    Danish Defense Intelligence Service Weekly Brief (Excerpts)

    Denmark reports on the fact that the Soviet Union does not wish for a Third World War and have abandoned Cuba as a military base, although they hope to keep it as a political base. There is also some reports on conflicts going on around the world in the 'global' Cold War. As a part of this weekly intelligence briefing, there is also a list of dates from the week with important events/actions listed for each of those days.

  • November 01, 1962

    Józef Dryglas, 'Record of Conversation with USSR Ambassador V. Moskovsky'

    Moskovsky advised Pak Geum-cheol and Kim Chang-man to cooperate with the Soviet-led socialist bloc. Conversation with Kim Il Sung and Moskovsky imply strong relations with the Soviet Union.

  • November 01, 1962

    Brazilian Embassy in Washington, Analysis of the Cuban Missile Crisis

    Campos sends an attached memorandum of analysis of the developments of the Cuban crisis, elaborated by the Political Sector of the Embassy. It discusses Soviet motivation, American actions, Soviet reactions, etc.

  • November 01, 1962

    Soviet Record of 1 November1962 Dinner conversation between CPSU CC Politburo Member A.I. Mikoyan and White House envoy John McCloy and US Ambassador to the UN Adlai Stevenson

    Mikoyan talks with Stevenson and McCloy about the rate of dismantling weapons in Cuba, asked when the Americans would lift the quarantine, as they promised to do so and poses the question of American presence in Guantanamo Bay. The U.S. side says all will be fulfilled once the dismantling of weapons is over.

  • November 02, 1962

    Telegram from Soviet Ambassador to Cuba A.I. Alekseev to USSR Foreign Ministry

    Alekseev discusses the response of Castro and Dorticos to certain documents.

  • November 02, 1962

    Telegram from USSR Foreign Minster A. Gromyko to unidentified recipient

    The U.S. allows Soviet ships to arrive at Cuba for the hastening of the removal process.

  • November 02, 1962

    Telegram from A.I. Mikoyan in New York to CC CPSU (2)

    Mikoyan discusses a meeting with McCloy and Stevenson where the two say that they approve of lifting the blockade for Soviet ships in order to speed up the removal process.

  • November 02, 1962

    Cable from Japanese Embassy in Moscow to Tokyo

    Describes the domestic reaction in Moscow following the Cuban Blockade by the US. The cable discusses how the real sense of crisis had been widespread in society, and that after the crisis was over there was a sense of relief.

  • November 02, 1962

    Cable no. 346 from the Czechoslovak Embassy in Havana (Pavlíček)

    Pavlicek's primary focus in this cable is the effect of the crisis on the national media. The Cuban media is stressing Castro's 5 Points, and some journalists are hesitant to report anything else. There is a slight thread of anticommunism and anti-Soviet sentiment breeding among the media, but these feelings are not widespread, according to Pavlicek. The press is holding off on coverage of all other events such as the Sino-Indian border conflict and Chinese support for Castro's 5 points until after his speech.

  • November 02, 1962

    Telegram from Yugoslav Foreign Ministry, Belgrade, to Yugoslav Embassies in Havana and Washington and the Yugoslav Mission to the United Nations, New York

    The Yugoslav Foreign Ministry relays to its embassies a summary of the Brazilian proposal on the Cuban Missile Crisis which, they say, mainly includes: the denuclearization of Latin America with inspections, Cuba's commitment to not "export" revolutionary operations, and guarantees to Cuba for sovereignty and independence. Allegedly, Castro welcomed the idea of the above plan. Brazil thinks that the USA could accept it after negotiations.

  • November 02, 1962

    Cable from Dutch Embassy, Havana (Boissevain), 2 November 1962

    Boissevain writes a cable detailing a meeting between Fidel Castro and UN Secretary General U Thant. Cuba refused any inspection of missile silos, if the Americans did not uphold their pledge to not threaten Cuba with invasion. The Five Points were mentioned as preconditions for peace and Castro pledged Cuba was ready and willing to work towards peace. It appears Castro was aware of Soviet considerations for "global politics" as the reason behind the Soviet withdrawal of missiles.

  • November 02, 1962

    Cable from Dutch Embassy, Washington (Van Roijen), 2 November 1962

    The cable concerns a conversation between Dutch Ambassador to the United States van Roijen and Director Ward P. Allen of the State Department's Bureau of Inter-American Regional Political Affairs, regarding further actions of the Organization of American States (OAS) in the aftermath of the Cuban crisis. Allen made note that he had very little information regarding Cuba and how Cuba would fit into future dealings with the OAS.

  • November 02, 1962

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy in Cuba, 'The Situation of the American Blockade of Cuba'

    A report from the Chinese Embassy in Cuba to the Military Intelligence Department describing the military situation of the US blockade of Cuba. It includes the US U-2 spy plane shot down and information regarding American troop and ship presence.

  • November 02, 1962

    Cable no. 348 from the Czechoslovak Embassy in Havana (Pavlíček)

    Fidel Castro's speech is the centerpiece of this cable from Pavlicek. Castro's rhetoric touched on the unity of the Cuban people, and their refusal to an "undignified agreement." Pavlicek predicts his speech will foster a great response both internally and externally. Castro also acknowledged the help provided by the Soviet Union and the anti-Soviet campaign mounted by counterrevolutionaries. Pavlicek's only complaint was a lack of emphasis on the "critical role" the Soviet Union has played in the negotiations to resolve the crisis. However, the reaction to Fidel's speech is one of calming the situation and a clear orientation for the Cubans.

  • November 02, 1962

    Cable from Dutch Embassy, Washington (Van Roijen), 2 November 1962

    The cable is centered around Cuba and the Organization of American States (OAS). Van Roijen and Ward P. Allen discuss a cable intercepted from Venezuela about possible attempts of sabotage by pro-Castro organizations in Caracas. However, there is no report from the U.S. Embassy Caracas to confirm this. There are, however, protests being reported in the American-aligned Latin American countries, which is seen as an attempt by Cuba to stir revolutionary sentiment in these countries. The size and frequency of these protests by pro-Castro and communist groups is very limited.

  • November 02, 1962

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy in Cuba, 'The Problem of How to Express a Position on the Cuban-Soviet Relationship'

    A request from the Chinese Embassy in Cuba to the Foreign Ministry office, asking advice on the position they should take in regards to the complex Soivet-Cuban relationship. The embassy suggests China support the speech made by Castro on 1 November 1962, but that otherwise discussions of Soviet-Cuban relations should not be discussed at Chinese initiative.

  • November 02, 1962

    Chinese Embassy to the Soviet Union, Information on the report delivered by Maj. Boris Gelibusiji from the defense department of the Soviet Union in the Moscow Engineering and Physics College

    Further information from the Chinese Embassy to the Soviet Union on the report delivered by Maj. Boris Gelibusiji from the Defense Department of the Soviet Union in the Moscow Engineering and Physics College, describing comments he made on the Sino-Indian border conflict and the Cuban Missile Crisis.

  • November 02, 1962

    Cable from the Chinese Embassy in Cuba, 'Reactions of Cuban Society to Fidel Castro’s Address'

    A report from the Chinese Embassy in Havana describing the reactions to a speech made by Fidel Castro, in which he said Cuba would not trade for peace by making concessions to imperialism, and to the Chinese support of Cuba's position.

  • November 02, 1962

    Telegram from A.I. Mikoyan in New York to CC CPSU (1)

    Mikoyan discusses statements made by McCloy concerning dismantling of weapons and U.S. flyovers in Cuba.

  • November 02, 1962

    Telegram from the Brazilian Delegation at the United Nations, New York, 8 p.m., Friday

    De Melo-Franco outlines the motives that underlie the Brazilian draft about the denuclearization of Latin America (in the United Nations). Panama, Argentina, Nicaragua, Haiti and Peru express their concerns/questions/support of the Brazilian resolution.